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Serendipitous

So I was hoping to have more done to the car before this post but I figured it's been a while, maybe it's time. The project has come to a little bit of a lull and I'm hoping that making this post and reminiscing on the project might motivate me to get things done. There has been a fair amount done to the car, with the help of a friend I was able to knock several things off the build list. (This post is a small portion of the things that have been done since last time)   A few pleasant surprises happened while I was installing various parts on the car. The Kirkey racing seats and brackets bolted right up to the stock holes. I actually ended up moving the driver side back an inch or two to give myself more leg room (6'2"), but other than drilling the 4 holes no modification was needed. Then we mocked up the Takata racing harnesses. These bolted right up to the stock location too! I'm using the 4 point snap harness that uses eye bolts to mount them.     The motor was a little more of a pain in the butt to get mocked up though. I used a spare subframe, motor, trans, driveshaft to get everything lined up and clearanced. My motor is still at the machine shop, but the transmission came back. I took a wire wheel to it and I think it came out beautiful. It's a Getrag 245 with an M20 bellhousing (off a 323i).     I'm following @AceAndrew's build very closely and he mentions that the hole for the shift lever needs to be moved back some. Well without even trying or measuring it was determined the Ireland Engineering 5 speed selector rod was the correct length. Easy peasy! It's the AKG tunnel mounted short shifter, a very very nice piece but also very overpriced in my opinion. #becauseracecar     A few more of the details on the body got done. Mocked up the @Ireland Engineering turbo body kit. Got the roof rack from @LimeySteve which looks awesome. Mounted the fuel cell in the trunk as well as the ATL gas cap (waaaayyyy too much money spent on that thing, but I'm very happy with the result).     I also got a few things done while I was bored at home, wait that's a lie nothing is boring anymore now that there's an almost toddler running around the house. I flocked the glovebox. It could have been better, but for a first time flocker it came out pretty OK. Super, super easy to do and there was enough in the Flock-It kit to do like 20 gloveboxes. I also got the carbs and linkage mocked up. There might be a few changes I make after it's in the car, but you get the idea. Ideally there should be and throttle arm going to each carb but since the TPS is mounted on one side that is not really possible, unless I move the whole assembly over with a longer rod. Are those carbs vintage or new? All in the details baby!     A new love has entered my life. It's not cheating on the '02 since we are in an open relationship and she allows for other BMW's to be a part of my life. I was sick and tired of my daily driver not being a BMW (and a doodoo car) so I've been on the lookout for something better. I picked up this little guy from AZ, actually PO drove it to Cali for me so I knew the motor was decent. She's got a few scars but just right fro me, AC blows cold, similar gas mileage as my old car, it's an investment, and it's something I actually know how to and can work on myself. This is what she looked like when I picked her up, she's been taking up some of my time lately, so she actually looks a bit different now. 1991 325is.     And finally as promised...the build sheet. Things may change but mostly this is it. I'm always on the lookout for the next cool thing. PM me or comment with any questions/ideas you have on my build, I like to talk shop.  Monster 2002 Build Sheet.xlsx   Next on the list: -Welding in the cage -Removing tar insulation -Grinding down all the holes welded up -Mounting the gas pedal (IE billet)
 

Let the fun begin

I liberated the right outer wheel housing from this car last year to help save the '68 that was T-Boned. After looking at all 3 outer wheel housings this spring I decided I had enough metal that I could make two parts...   This is really where I decided to commit to saving this '73. I have no intention of building a trailer queen from this pile. It's going to be a safe/sound driver that I'm not going to be paranoid about. As a college school student I made some doodles of my 1600 with a turbo aero kit and stripes. I've always wanted a turbo kit'd '02. That desire for flares and an airdam lead me to realize that I I don't need the arches... If I don't need the arches then I don't really need many repair panels beyond what I've saved from the '69. If I have an airdam I don't need a pretty nose or a front bumper for that matter... If I don't need a pretty nose I can clean up one of the others and still harvest this clean replacement for the '68.   In the past week I've managed to patch the right inner rocker panel, repair the bottom of the right A- pillar and repair/install the right rocker panel. The front half of the rocker is original to this car. The back half came from the '68 (which is getting a new OEM rocker). After I finish welding in the rocker later this week I'll start on the floor and frame rail repairs on the right side of this car. Both sides are utter garbage but I've still got the floor pans from the '69 so I'm got the majority of the metal needed to fix the soft spots on this one. I'll hand fab the rest from sheet steel as needed.       A box showed up on Saturday steeling my resolve to see this car to completion.

VWJake

VWJake

seperation of builds

I originally bought 2 cars- a '68 and a '69 in a package deal in 2016. Within a year this '73 popped up on CL as a parts car. It had been stripped of most anything small/easily removed and left for dead after a stalled restoration some 15+ yrs ago.         When I bought this car my initial intention was to harvest a quarter panel, wheel housing, nose, hood, and any other useful sheet metal for patches to repair my '68 and '69s. After I got the car home and cleaned it out I was able to confirm that this car was curiously sound in some strange places- The wheel housings, rear subframe mounts, and the rear rocker areas. The quarters and wheel arches are all nice as well. Everything else is a flaming tire fire body wise. I spent an hour or so getting the car running to realize that the engine seems to run quite well with no smoke or odd noises. I honed the brake master, clutch slave and master, and both brake cailpers, replaced the soft lines, capped off the rotten rear brake line and bled the system. Once I swapped out the rotten pedal box I was rewarded with functional brakes and a good clutch. The car now ran and "drove" ( in the most basic of senses- I didn't have to push it anymore). I drove the car into a shelter in the backyard where it is still resting today. Last fall I removed the right quarter panel with plans to use it on my '68. This spring the '69 turned into a pile of parts with the help of a body saw and a sawsall. Despite all of the rust I think this car is worth giving a second chance. I mean really... It runs, moves, and stops... How hard could the rest be? lol

VWJake

VWJake

'73 metal work and more boxes showing up

I welded the repaired right outer wheel housing back on the '73 a week or so ago. I was using weld through primer and had a horrible experience with the stuff. When coating both parts and trying to plug weld the welds popped and splattered as if I was welding a pile of rust in a puddle of oil. I tried letting it dry more thoroughly, and finally settled on using a flat faced drill bit to scrape away the primer within the weld hole. The welds were tolerable, but not what I wanted to see. Going forward I won't be using any more of that, I'll treat the seams after the fact with a "creeping" sealer of some sort. Anyway, after getting the outer wheelhouse and the C pillar bracing back on the '73 I rehung and tacked on the quarter panel. It's only tacked at the B and C pillars for now as I still have an outer rocker panel to replace and a trunk floor to repair.   Once the quarter was fitted and clamped down I decided to remove the remaining rocker panel from the right side of the car. The inner rocker was rotten at the leading edge and the bottom of the A-pillar was in pretty sorry shape as well. After I cut away the lower A-pillar I found a solid inner rocker minus the first 8" or so. I cut the inner rocker back to good clean margins and took it to the garage to use as template. Some 16ga steel sheet, a bit of work on the bead roller, some hammering (folded edge at the front), and trimmed to fit and I was ready to weld it in.         More 16ga sheet stock, hammers, dollies, cut-off wheels, and a welder got me a fresh lower A-pillar. It was tricky recreating the pad the backs up the jack point on the outer rocker skin. Originally I thought I would just hammer it in... That wasn't working at all so I made to two slices in the sheet so I could make an offset section. Once the depth of the offset was good I added filler pieces and welded it all back together. I didn't figure the size of my patch panel properly when I laid it out so I had to go back and add a little piece in the upper front corner. No harm though. It's all welded in a good to go. Plug welds and folded edges mimic the original. I left the lower edge loose until I was ready to re install the rocker panel as I wanted to make sure the new A pillar contour matched the old rocker.       With the lower A pillar repairs completed I refit the front portion of the right outer rocker. There was a small section after the jack pad that was pretty severely rusted from the inside so I cut that out and patched it with some 16ga sheet. After the upper and lower lips were straightened and the flanges were scuffed I aligned and plug welded the outer rocker back to the car. With that section fully welded I realized that I needed to remove the quarter panel again to install the replacement section of the outer rocker (harvested from the '68). So off with the quarter again. It only took a few minutes as there were just a few tack welds and a hand full of vise grips holding it on. I didn't quite get the rear portion of the rocker fully burned in before quiting time today.         A couple of boxes showed up yesterday. One from W&N and the other from Ireland Engineering. The former included 2 new outer rockers (left for the '73 and right for the '68), a right outer wheel arch for the '68, a lower trailing edge quarter repair panel for the '73, and some small odds n ends (door handle gaskets, etc.). The later included 4 ABS Turbo flares and a fiberglass turbo air dam for the '73. I've wanted a turbo-look '02 since I was a young lad. The '73 seem like the right car to fulfill that desire with.   I spent some time in the garage yesterday taking all 6 tail lenses (4 red centers and 2 ambers) apart (prying out the reflectors/inlays) to create the 4 best lens that I could. I managed to create 2 nice Red center lenses and 1 nice Amber and 1 decent Amber. With all of the inlays out I could clean everything really well and them mix n match parts as needed to make the best assemblies that I could. Someone previously tried to repair one of the amber lens with super glue after a hot bulb ruined the marker light portion of the lens. After getting the replacement red reflector portion out I could see that they didn't put in the clear prism segment (probably because of the bulging lens). I carefully ground down and polished (the best that I could) the remaining material. The glue deposits a white film or coating sometimes. It typically develops on finger prints and other smudges/smears. This lens looked terrible. With the inlays out I was able to polish away the deposits to make it generally presentable. I still want to polish the outsides of the lenses with a buffing wheel to really make them shine but for now I'm pleased with my progress. Once the outsides are polished and the lenses are washed one last time I will use dabs of clear silicone to secure the inlays. I also glass bead blasted a pair of lamp housings and painted them white on the inside and aluminum on the outside. The aluminum is too "bright" in my opinion. When I refinish the 2nd set I'll likely just clear coat the outside. The white is an old hotrodders trick to brighten up tail lamps. Looking forward to seeing the fruits of my labor when the time comes.                    

VWJake

VWJake

 

Pittsburgh!

Drove the 750 miles in12 hours averaging 62.5 mph including traffic and fuel/bathroom breaks. Have the coveted garage space at the inlaw's house. Wore my Piloti driving shoes for the first time, first time driving a long distance my right knee didn't ache. Usually get out of the car limping because my knee hurts so much. Gotta be the shoes.
 

Wing work.

The front end is getting some attention now. It’s been (as you would expect) a discovery project of rust. The good news - it’s not overly bad. I just bought left and right inner A pillar panels from restoration design, where I have purchased all my parts, and they are on the way. After those are on we can begin layering all the new panels together. 

2002VT

2002VT

MikeWooldridge

Somehow all the entries were lost.  However, please visit these two links. https://indiandales.blogspot.com/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/indiandale/albums/72157603029691084 Thanks for looking. MikeWooldridge FAQ member 60
 

I found a great puzzle box!

When I restore cars, I like to have both the puzzle car and a puzzle box car.  Sometimes that is pretty diificult. Sometimes it works out great!  I am still bogged down with another project and have not been able to bring my stripped down Polaris '75 back from the warehouse yet, but I came across an amazing deal on a puzzle box 2002!  It is a Chamonix '74 and it is an older restoration that still looks spectacular.  I picked it up today in New York and hauled it back home.   The car is pristine inside and out!  It has a very, very small list of immediate needs (5-speed shift linkage needs to be tightened up and the rebuilt engine with 38/38 weber and 292 cam idles a little low when cold) that I should be able to bang out in no time.  Look for me and this car at the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix!         
 

Heater core removed! Now to overhaul.

So with the dash out it made sense to also pull and contemplate a heater box overhaul as well.   So I pulled it from the car today. Fairly easy qty 2 11mm on the bulkhead and two clamps to detach the hoses.    Set it down and cleared away the discintegrated 50 year old foam.    As others have warned...there is still antifreeze in the unit!    I layed down some linoleum on the passenger side floor and tilted it out to that side.... sure enough.    If your doing this job as well have rags/ paper towels handy.   Variety of pics below.

Dionk

Dionk

Things are starting to fall into place

I’ve been working on both the ‘68 and the ‘73 simultaneously. I’ve cut apart/straightened/welded/glass bead blasted enough pieces to make two whole right outer wheel housings. The housing intended for the ‘73 doesn’t have a lip as that car is slated to get the “Turbo” treatment.        I cut the original ‘68 quarter in half to make it more manageable. I stripped an 1/8”-3/16” of bondo from the rear half. I really just need the lower 4” or so so it’s not a big deal that the panel was so wrinkled. I’ll likely save it and “metal finish” the rest of it at a later date. It is vintage metal after all.     So my original plan was to use the ‘73 QP on the ‘68 and the ‘69 QP on the ‘73... I started looking at what needs to be repaired on the ‘73 panel, the need to swap the filler neck flange, and the side maker holes to close up and came to the conclusion that it might be easier to repair the ‘69 panel and mount it on the ‘68. I already have the forward lower quarter repair panel. All I need to finish the ‘69 panel is the arch and the rear lower patch. The panel is straight and clean otherwise. Most of what would be removed from the ‘73 panel for repair will be cut off when the flares go on. Not to mention it then becomes a simple task of matching all of the appt welds back up to reattach that panel. Easy peazy.        With some light pushes between the subframe bolt pockets, the inner wheel housings, and the outer seat belt mounts I now have subframe bolts that are parallel and 1180mm apart. I also have a right side rocker panel that looks good against a straight edge on both the top and bottom flanges. I will check that it is parallel with the left side of the car soon.    I tied a rope around the B-pillars and cinched it up until the C pillar connector plate made contact with the wheel house. I’ll be darned if the contour of the B pillar doesnt finally match with that if the A and C pillars. Things are looking good. Sighting across the currently incomplete wheel house and across the lower B pillar shows the same picture between the 68 and the 73. While I still intend to build a frame for the car and measure/pull as needed, I’m starting to think that the back 2/3rds of this car may not need anything more than careful attention to panel alignment during welding to keep it square.       I’m about ready to start welding panels back on the ‘73 so I can move it back to the garage for some more metal work.

VWJake

VWJake

It has a face!

It was nice this weekend to tackle some smaller jobs that result in a bigger change in the garage art.  The first little task was installing the rear glass.  It wasn't that bad, but then again I still haven't done the lock strip.  The rope trick really does work.  Word of caution you will need more than 15 feet to have a good handle to start.  Also all the comments about get it centered first...yeah listen to them, really eases the process.  Had to support my friends car club.  After all it started after I drug this thing home with him telling me to walk 3 years ago... I then cleaned up, sand and masked to flat black the nose.  I also cleaned up the headlight buckets.  I must confess the car is the same color as masking tape...so I may have missed a little corner... All in I'm pretty happy with the grill-less nose.  I would love some good condition round grills.  The problem is they are so much $.  I like this look and think it adds a little to the "outlaw" look of this '02.  Stay tuned for our next installment, more glass install, followed by removing the engine...again.  Hopefully over the 4th I will get the steering set screws drilled and locktited, clutch installed, and the engine in for the LAST TIME, before vroom vroom.  

maikell77

maikell77

 

9.5 hours of detailing

Woke up at 5:30 am. Spent 9.5 hours today working on Vern. Cleaned & waxed the rear subframe, half shafts, boots and brake backing plates which still need some attention. Dismantled, cleaned, detailed and reassembled the sunroof rails and Golde wind deflector. Returned the ashtray from an iPod/iPhone dock back to an ash tray, that took at least 3 hours.

adawil2002

adawil2002

 

3 piece dash removal - notes & pics

I read as many threads as possible on three piece dashboard removal and attacked the job today.     I found the threads with pics to be most helpful. I think it was pho23 that had a some great pics and I gave his DIY thread titled "Removing a 3 piece dash." dated  oct 28 2007 thread 5 Stars.   i followed the steps he described in the thread and found no issues with the instructions at all.       Here are the things I broke in the process.   1. Air vent hose to plastic dash vents.  2. Tabs on the plastic dash vents.   3. A couple clips pulled off the dash and stayed in the car.    My advice is to go slow to a avoid the mistakes I made.   here are the pics    

Dionk

Dionk

 

Makes me happy.....

Pulling the garage door down, felt like 300 degrees today here in Northern Cal, sun beating in the garage...snapped this one.  These little m10 motors really are pretty amazing whether it be a stock o2, tii, turbo....or this - the ultimate iteration of that motor....(well maybe the ultimate would be the same/similar motor with a turbo (Schnitzer 1.4 turbo)....

markmac

markmac

 

Under Hood Stickers

Placed all the under hood stickers, finally. Original and new there are some differences as some stickers are NLA like the 'BMW air pressure' which was near the left turn signal. So had to compromise with what is currently available.   Does anyone have a picture of where the Ate blue/white sticker goes in the brake booster?    

adawil2002

adawil2002

More outer wheelhouse progress

The original ‘68 panel keeps getting smaller and smaller.      The panel destined to be installed on the ‘68 got a new “dust pan” made out of a piece of the ‘68 panel. I’ll smooth out all of the welds/check for gaps and carry on with the repairs. I left the metal outside of the bead long so that I could fold it over to address some corrosion in the well. The fender lip/body line should be challenging to recreate, but I’m looking forward to it.    The panel for the ‘73 is coming along also. I cut off most of the perforated metal, welded in 2 pieces from the ‘68 panel and I’ve started to fit the trail end from the ‘73 panel as well.      Believe it or not there is a method to my madness. Side note: there’s another cart saved on WN just waiting for me to earn a bit more money to justify clicking the complete order button.

VWJake

VWJake