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  1. Hagerty invited my car to be photographed for use in their magazine. They are directing some of their marketing to a younger audience so they photographed a few collector cars that are more affordable for younger enthusiasts. Amazing what a professional photographer can do. BTW, I'm not in any way affiliated with Hagerty. Cheers.
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  2. I know that not everyone is a BMW CCA member, and that's okay. But yesterday I was part of an absolutely remarkable CCA event. I'll be doing a Roundel article on it, but you folks are special, so you get the mini-version first :^) Yale Rachlin was editor of Roundel Magazine for many years. He had a 1974 2002tii, Chamonix with Motorsport stripes, that was very well-known in the club. Even if Yale weren't Roundel editor, he was a well-known driving instructor, and the car was on many tracks in the eastern US for many years. The Massachusetts licence plate on the car was "YaleR." When Yale's wife Bette had knee trouble and they had to downsize to only one car, he sold the car in the early 2000s to 'CCA founder Michel Potheau's dentist, a decision Yale always deeply regretted. Yale passed away in 2005. The car fell into disrepair. It was rescued by Vince Strazzabosco, who later sold it to Justin Gerry. Justin and his father Bob restored the car, keeping the external appearance the way Yale had it, but making modifications underneath for the many track days Justin did with the car. He maintained a Georgia "YaleR" plate, so the name "YaleR" stuck with the car. About three weeks ago, in a remarkable act of generosity, YaleR was purchased by BMW CCA members Scott and Fran Hughes and donated to the BMW CCA Foundation. The induction ceremony was yesterday (Saturday January 14th). I was privileged to ride in the car from Justin's home in Georgia to the Foundation in Spartanburg. There was a caravan of about two dozen cars accompanying YaleR on his final journey to the Foundation. However, immediately upon leaving, Justin instinctively made a turn to take the route he'd take when driving to work in Atlanta. We were then honor-bound to catch up with the caravan. I was in the car when Justin wailed the living shit out of it (see photograph, and yes it has a 5-speed :^). It was glorious. I'm not one who believes in the whole "person X is smiling down" thing, but if ever there was a time to believe in it, it was this. As we got off the interstate, Justin hit exit ramp, popped it down into 3rd, and nailed it. YaleR gobbled up the ramp. Justin said "sorry; I just had to do that one last time." I was smiling from ear to ear. The induction ceremony at the Foundation was well-attended and remarkable. Yale's 91 year old wife Bette and his daughter Meryl were in attendance, having driven up from Florida. Vince, Justin, and his dad all spoke about the rescue and restoration of the car, I read the chapter on Yale from my book, holding back tears. In addition to his duties as editor, Yale was ambassador of goodwill for the CCA. Anyone who ever spent a minute with him will attest to the fact that he never tired of talking with CCA members, and never for an instant made them feel that he needed to be somewhere else, that THAT conversation, THEIR conversation was always the most important thing in the world to him, and it actually was. He was a wonderful man, a mentor to me, and I still miss him terribly. Everything that was good and decent in this world, the shared bond that we have over this boxy Teutonic sedan, was right there in that room at the BMW CCA Foundation. Keep on 02ing, everybody. --Rob
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  3. I've been out of it due to other priorities the past few months, but let me just roll a New Years and a Thanksgiving post together and say thank you to the FAQ, which continues to be the planet's best repository of 2002-specific knowledge. Stay strong, stay 02. --Rob
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  4. The just-completed race car build went to the track yesterday for a shake-down, here it is in the garage with some muscle car brethen (the turbo flares certainly pale in comparison to the Cobra body shape, but it holds its own, I think). -KB
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  6. Had an admirer of my car stop by and view it from a different angle...the tip of the antenna...
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  7. Thought I'd share some pictures of our January ATX 2002 C&C. We had a good turnout with a total of 18 making the event and 16 being 2002s. We started having the C&C last January and have had successful events each month. Its always difficult to get all of our local 02rs to attend as we all have so much going on. We could easily push 30 02s if the stars ever line up just right. Just about every month we have a new 02 show up. How neat is that! Rudy from down in the Houston area brought 6 of his 02s up this month. Got to love that! A big thanks to Terry Sayther for helping me spread the word each month. Also big thanks to Rudy for bring some of his 02s up this month. Already looking forward to our February C&C. I'll be getting out this coming Saturday to see if I can identify a new spot to hold our event as we're growing in numbers.
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  8. out of parts and pieces from four or five I hope to make one...reminding me of the johnny cash song, I got it one piece at time...
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  9. After more than four years, both cars are under the same roof again. That makes me feel better. That's all, t
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  10. Hi everyone, OP here to provide final update. Well, its all put back together and so far so good. Can't drive it around because of salt on the roads, but at least was able to pull in and out of the garage. Can't wait to make it fly. It was a long haul, with lots of scope creep and downtime but finally finished it. Here is a list of what I did -Replaced clutch, center bearing, pressure plate, TO bearing with 228 mm clutch kit -Resurfaced flywheel -Replaced rear main seal and added shim -Replaced trans seals, metal/rubber bushings, trans/exhaust support -Replaced center driveshaft bearing, cleaned and painted driveshaft -Replaced slave clutch cylinder and connecting tube -Sandblasted and coated headers -Cleaned, painted, and rubberized trans/driveshaft tunnel -Cleaned up tons of goop, slop, and other unmentionables. Thanks to all who have encouraged, suggested, and provided advice.. too many to list, but are on this thread. Finally, Here are some pics, with the last one my favorite... My 14 year old helper under the car when we put the trans back in place.
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  11. I wanted to wish everyone all the best these holiday seasons and in the new year! steve k.
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  12. September 17, 2015 is when the complete strip down began and today, I've competed a major milestone of getting all four wheels back on the ground. Over the last year I've completely stripped, primed and recoated the underside. I've had both the front and rear subframes powder coated, as well as a few other parts. And I've installed IE lowering springs, sway bars and new shocks all round. I've got a long way to go, but felt good getting it down today. I've asked this community a ton of questions and even relied on one of you (Mike, OH) to help with the acquisition. Thank you all for your help and expertise as I don't think I could have accomplished this without your insights. Have a great 2017 and I'm stoked to start on the next phase.
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  13. Most of you might not care, but the site will be converted to SSL soon and comunication between your browser and the site will be secure. Right now secure comunication is only on the login page. i still need to fix a few of the unsecure connections. Once those are done i will enable SSL in test mode. Once most is tested, all connections will be forced to SSL steve k.
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  14. ...of course I don't have the right tools, or the know how, so I just improvise and forge ahead. Here's my Recipe for removing bushings: Ingredients: BF Hammer Screwdrivers Ratchet Various Ratchet heads Ratchet extension Torch PB Blaster Beer Ball joint remover 3/4" bolt 6 inches long Some 3/4 Nuts Various 3/4 washers 1 1/2" PVC Plumbing coupler Did I mention a Hammer? Laptop Pandora, loud. Large Vice WARNING: Do not add beer until fully cooked. Early beer addition could lead to serious injury and broken stuff. I'm only saying this once. Procedure: Surf the internet and FAQ to see how other people have done it. Read descriptions and feel like an idiot. Try to figure out just what is going on in those pictures? Watch a youtube video where Joe Shadetree completes a similar job in 3 minutes. Stare at the new bushings; unwrap them if you want. Go to HD and spend $1.30 on a washer and some PVC. Find out that isn't going to work so go to hardware store and spend $9 on some other stuff. Drop ingredients randomly around a garage and workbench. No need to be organized. You'll lose and break stuff anyway. Stir violently, adding occasional "you POS!" and "you bastard!" now and then. It helps loosen the bushings. Bang the crap out of something from time to time. "Heat" them up until the rubber bursts into flame. Blow that out. Savor the smell of burnt rubber and PB Blaster in your garage. It will be there a while. Try the ball joint remover. Try to 6 inch bolt. Hit it with the hammer. Curse. Ratchet the crap out of something. Did it move? Spray liberally with PB blaster, getting backsplash all over your face. More torch, more flame, more burned rubber. Wiggle that bolt around somewhat violently. Hit it some more. That's what the BFH is for! Success! Your wife doesn't care. Add beer. Nice job!
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  17. New work completed: Pump back from Wes Ingram. Before and after. Here's some video I took while the pump was being tested on the bench. Block machined and painted. Crankshaft "plasti-gauge tested and torqued. New bearings and polish.
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  18. Pole barn. BIZARRE construction: Purlins, girts, and other things that... well, the inspector seemed ok with them... I'll modify things as I ... modify things... It will be... it will be. It's been below freezing for 3 weeks, so I can't get the floor finished.... CoupeGUY. I messed up, as he sold the molds not long after I bought them, and I didn't buy them. I don't know who has them... They're good for another 10cm (!!!) of clearance. Old American Racing Libre's under them, with A008's (!!!?!!!) Yes, Ray, of course! PRO3 car- modified suspension, full cage, stock engine. I have been looking for an is for years- a decent one is very hard to find at this point. Marshall, see below... t
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  19. I have a BMW case, known as a koffer I think, pretty rare too.
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  20. As of earlier today, i have switched the site to be fully on SSL (Secure Socket Layer). What this means is that all communication between your browser and our server is now encrypted. As it is hard for me to check all possible pages, if you find a problem that might be related to this change, please post it to https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/forum/12-site-problems-suggestions-and-questions/ Thanks, Steve K.
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  21. I will be attending and covering this event for Roundel, as I have, um, history with the car.
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  22. Another 10 years since I posted this and now I’m up to 40 years of ownership. Not the original owner (2nd owner) but she’s been my “girlfriend” for quite a while. She’s mainly a garage queen as I’ve been busy with other things in my life. Sadly, I've not been to any PNW outings in a number of years. I’m planning on installing some major upgrades this summer (A4, dog leg and QR steering box) and will post an update later this year. The paint has a few more chips and scratches, the recaros still need recovering but at least I installed a proper backup/rear fog light, rebuilt the pedal box, and installed a wideband sensor. The board (especially Steve) and vendor (Rob Torres and Blunt) have been instrumental in creating and supporting our community. Here's looking to 2017 (and keeping things positive)
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  23. Merry Christmas everyone. Papa Elf's sleigh is all polished up and ready to go. Hope y'all have a blessed Christmas. Ed Z
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  24. Hey, Raj, The U.S. headlight buckets are the same from 1966 through 1976. There is a part number change with the square taillight cars (commencing September 1973) solely because the sealed beam retaining ring shifts from plated (most were silver cadmium plated but I believe the very early cars may have had chrome plating) to black powdercoating. The retaining ring is a minor component and can be swapped with 3 screws. But the buckets themselves are fully interchangeable. The shallow-grille implementation had no effect whatsoever on the U.S. headlight bucket. It simply meant that one no longer needed the asymmetric filler rings that dressed up the gap -- on deep-grille cars -- between the headlight retaining ring and the leading edge of the deep-grille's headlight surround. Here's a set I restored for the 1973. Honestly, I have no idea what year car they came off: I bought them on eBay. For a round taillight car, you need: 2 headlight buckets, 2 plated retaining rings, 2 asymmetric filler rings with tiny fragile gaskets. You skip the filler rings if your car -- late 1972 model year through end of 1973 model year -- has shallow grilles. I've said it many times before, I'd bet that a huge portion of deep grille cars are today missing the filler rings. It's no big deal. Photos below: 1. Typical un-loved headlight bucket. 9 out of 10 that I've seen have paint overspray from post-factory front end repairs (oddly, even on 5th owner cars that have "never been hit" 😋). The buckets were fully plated originally and installed by the factory after the car was painted. 2. Typical un-loved retaining rings. Probably not particularly early as they simply have tired Cadmium plating. 3. Loved retaining rings. Re-plated in clear zinc. Note, this photo shows two slightly-different styles. The ring on the right has a slightly longer skirt. I've noticed minor differences such as these among buckets and rings. I don't know if these differences reflect (a.) intentional design changes over time, (b.) "accidental" manufacturing differences related to or un-related to time (e.g., a change in suppliers, multiple simultaneous suppliers, or a change in manufacturing method), or (c.) something else, but none of these minor differences seems to affect the universal fit of the buckets and retaining rings. 4. Loved headlight buckets. Re-plated in yellow and clear zinc. One of these is the same as shown in the first photo. It always takes me about 15 minutes to distinguish a left bucket from a right bucket so I'm not going to even try! Regards, Steve
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  25. Here's how they look after zinc plating. -KB
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  26. From October to the end of December nothing got done on the car. Well, that's not really true. I got a ton of small parts back from the cad platers, and they look good. But for the most part, until this past week all my time for the past two months has been hunting, making stuff for Christmas in my shop, some crunch time at work, and then the actual holidays. But this past week, gentle reader. This past week shit got done. Started the same as seemingly all my other work weekends. Rainy. Yep, I made the 4 hour drive to Richmond in the rain in only 7 hours! A most excellent start. ;-) At least I got to avoid all the sleet and ice back home in PA. Never mind the cold rain. Lets get cutting. And test fitting.... And more cutting and grinding and cleaning and osphoing... And some jacking (yes, there are jackstands under there - just hard to seem them) And more fitting (getting close now!)... And weld through primering... And more panel prep... (and if you have a keen eye, you will see that there has been a little welding too - I shut up the areas where the panel had cut outs for right hand drive cars) The notches at the bottom of the panel are relief cuts to allow the panel to fit properly and tightly. Its finally time to weld! Lots of layers. Gotta try and stay warm. Sum total of 2 days work. Keeping in mind I'm NOT a metal worker or welder by trade, I'm pleased! Still need to fill in the fitting notches and grind down the rosettes, (not pictured) but the welds mostly layed down very nice. Little blow through. Panel fitment is excellent. Very tight against all the mating surfaces, though the back edge took a LOT of hammering to get right. Next day (New Years Eve Day - Day 3) I started on the back drivers side floor. This panel was not NEARLY as bad as the front pass side, but I still bought a new panel for it. Cut out the rust. I also cut out the bulkhead to take home and fix the rust through on the bottom flange. This will be a fairly easy fix. Sadly, I lost track of the wires in the spark shower while cutting out the bulkhead flange. The cut off wheel touched them and cut them like a knife through butter. GRUMBLE. But they are color coded and there are not that many of them. Could have been worse. I did a little more cutting, fitting and cleaning in the back, but now it was getting cold, and it was getting closer to New Years Eve party time. So a quick scrub with Ospho, cleaning up the work area, putting away tools and such and work time was over. After several work sessions over the summer and fall that essentially equaled "prep," it was very gratifying to be able to start putting good metal back into the car again. Several steps closer now to being able to put some of these nicer parts back on the car. Zach
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  27. I would like to ask that if you have a question or wonder why I didn't do something a certain way, or even better, some tips on how to do something better, please put them in the comments or PM me. My method is usually try to figure it out and if I can't Google it. That doesn't mean I thought everything through properly and I'm always looking to learning more. So: Four months and (some) progress! Thank god I’m doing this before kids. Its difficult to find time but determination and drive is still strong. I am fearful of needing to tell someone “Oh that? That’s the project car I never finished.” Please do not misinterpret this as a “Well it looks like that’ll work, let’s move on”. When I left off, I had tipped the car on her side and scraped the entire underside down to bare metal. A task accomplished much easier with the car on its side. And if you are going to be welding, you might as well weld up an errr, car tipper(-er?). After it was scraped and wire wheeled, I prepped for POR15. I purchased: 1 Gallon POR-15 40104 Cleaner Degreaser 1 Gallon POR-15 40201 Metal Prep 1 Quart POR-15 45404 Semi Gloss Black Rust Preventative Paint 1 Quart POR-15 45904 Top Coat I read the directions and put down some plastic so that after I degreased and etched the underside of the car I could rinse it out of the garage. After degreasing and etching, I scuffed the underside and began to apply the Rust Preventative Paint in a thin coat as directed. I applied two coats in two days. I used about ¾ of the quart for the parts that I painted. I did not paint the wheel wells or the trunk portion past the diff mounts. I would suggest buying 2 quarts to cover the entire underside plus front and rear wheel wells. Buy the crappy paint brushes. It's not worth the hassle of trying to clean them after this stuff. Just throw them out and move on with your life. I didn't realize how thin of a paint it was. I was expecting a thick epoxy, but it really quite thin and runs quickly if too much is applied. Shop Manager Poncho thought it turned out pretty well and gave me an 'adda boy paw shake. I then purchased 3M Ultra Pro 8300 Auto Body Sealant to seal up all the welded joints on the underside. I think it was about $25 a tube. It worked pretty well and uses a standard caulk gun. 3M instructs the user to really press the sealer into the joints with your finger. I believe they suggest waxing your glove so the sealer doesn't stick to it. I did not do this and it did stick to the glove which became frustrating and tiresome pretty quickly. The weather got too cold so I have yet to put on the POR 15 Top Coat over the paint and seam sealer. I'll do this when the weather warms up again. The car is high enough off the ground where it won't be a problem. After I sealed as much as I could, my friend down the street came by and we flipped the car back right side up. I welded a saw horse for the front frame rails that picks up the front sub frame bolt holes so the car won't slide off. I built a wooden support for the rear that slides into the rear diff ears. A 2x6 fits perfectly right in. The car now sits about 38” off the ground. Then I got back to the body work What I have learned about sheet metal and bodywork is if you’re not willing to do it all again, you shouldn’t be doing it. It is not easy and the only way to learn is the hard, arduous way. I welded parts on, then cut them off because I didn't like the fit. I have found that the seam between two sheets may bulge out, sink in or stay perfectly tangent or co-linear. The latter of the three was very rare for me. What I found was that if the seam is going to either bulge or sink, you would rather have it sink. If the seam bulges you will be grinding the weld until it is pretty much gone in order to get the body lines correct. In most cases you will grind through the weld way before the body lines return to their correct contour. If the seam sinks, then after the weld is ground to or below the body line, it can be filled with a light coat of body filler. I am not sure what a master auto body specialist would do, I assume all their welds would be perfectly tangent to the body lines and they would just do minimal skim coats of body filler. I am no master auto body specialist. Also, A body hammer and dolly block kit is very useful and really helps out. I have the GearWrench 82302 kit I welded on the passenger rocker patch panel with good success and the lower rear quarter patch panel. Going slow is key. If you move too fast and put too much heat into the metal, it will distort. I thought I was going slow enough and I wasn't. I ended up cutting the rear panel out and welding it back in because the seam bulged out. This is not the time to run a long bead. Short penetrating tacks followed by ample time to cool. I am currently welding in the passenger rear wheel arch pretty successfully. I am getting a sink in the seam in some places, it isn't too bad and can be filled easily with a light coat of filler. My goal is really to keep the need for body filler to a minimum and have good, quality welds holding the car together. I also replaced a patch in the spare tire well. It was a little tricky but actually came out well. I did this while the car was still on its side. It was difficult because it curved around from the bottom up the round wall. After I cut out the bad metal, I hammered it flat - what we call a flat pattern - so that I could replicate the piece from new metal. I tacked it in then began massaging the metal around the bends, tacking it in as it started to line up. I wish I had more to report, but thats about it. Back to the garage. No rest for the weary! Well, maybe for the shop manager. Cheers, Pete
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  28. Surprisingly little sarcasm from Mr. Regular on this episode. He must have been caught off guard by how great a car it actually is.
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  29. Still need to take this car to get the headliner fixed. Every time I want to go, something comes up and I have to wait another day or week. So I decided to get the carpet and interior panels in, and take the car in for headliner and final glass install next week, when the rain subsides (hopefully). I'll get the carpet done this week. First piece went in this morning, and I may finish it tomorrow, though Saturday or Sunday completion is more likely.
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  30. AVOID PEEL AND SEAL AT ALL COSTS!!! No matter how many people have used it, it's not worth it. It will leach, especially around the transmission tunnel. I just spent 40+ hours removing that shit from the '71. There wasn't much of a smell, but my carpet did get stuck in a number of places and it was ruined when I removed it. Don't waste your time with a cheap product, the money you'll save now will bite you in the ass later when you have to fix something else. If I could go back in time I would have not bought any of it and left the OEM stuff until I came around to spending a few hundred on better materials. I spent a lot of time this past summer reading all of those diyma posts and whatever else I could find. In the end I went with the SDS stuff, IIRC it actually was a bit less expensive than an equivalent ft^2 of dynamat extreme and weight vs damping was so close I'd consider that irrelevant. Or maybe the same damping you'd need less ft^2 of SDS...I don't recall right now. When applying it, don't cover every square inch like people(myself included) used to do. Read that diyma thread linked above and the SDS website. I haven't gotten to doing it in my 02 and likely won't for a good while. I did do the whole shebang to my daily last summer though. --My experience with the full sds product line & install, the "short" version.-- Not a direct comparison obviously, but I wanted to make my '91 volvo 245 a better "daily"/travel vehicle while keeping the interior oem-ish. I ended up going the SDS route and bought the CLD tiles, MLV(ebay), and HMF. I also bought some "EZcool" from http://www.lobucrod.com/. I used that on the sides and ceiling, CLD tiles on the everywhere, HMF on the ceiling + sides, and MLV/decoupling layer on the floor + sides. CLD tiles are for damping vibrations, MLV is for "blocking" noise, and HMF is for absorbing. The EZcool is for heat management and does next to nothing for sound dampening. I found a sheet metal shear(think giant paper cutter) was the best way to cut CLD tiles. Razor blades worked for everything else. It took a long f*cking time to install everything. Like the 02, the door panels sit on the door unlike a modern car which often has space between the metal and plastic interior panels. This made install a huge pain, lots of layout, test fit, cut away, try again... Installing the MLV was a huge pain too. Getting the carpet and seats to fit again after that small change in floor thickness was a battle. In the end, the car is quieter and more bearable in direct sun(ez cool). It would probably stay cooler if the AC worked at all. I drastically changed the stereo at the same time, so I can't use that to compare before/after volume level On the 2002 I'm more concerned with causing rust in the future due to trapping water, especially with it condensing on the sheet metal between the metal and the HMF or ezcool. I used 70ish CLD tiles, 7-8 hmf sheets, and a fair bit of ezcool which came out to 25-30lbs. The mlv was the killer at 70lbs or so. I'd expect 20-25lbs in the 2002 and I'll likely skip the MLV. Would I do it ALL again? No. It was not a big enough difference to make it worth while IMO. Maybe if I could do a side by side test with another 245 and a sound meter it would be noticeable. I would do the CLD tiles all around and maybe the HMF+ezcool on the sides/roof. My doors do make a satisfying thud when I shut them now...
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  31. the real problem: like me, he's no spring chicken. The only thing that smells worse than dead mouse is dead mouse in the furnace... t
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  32. I'm a closet audiophile as well as 02 geek, both on beer budgets so I'm always looking for the best bang-for-buck ratio. When doing research for my build I found this INSANELY over the top anal retentive head to head (ok, after typing that I realized that description should just be left alone, unpondered, don't even think about if it could really be a thing) shootout of constrained layer dampening sound deadeners - http://www.diymobileaudio.com/forum/member-reviews-product-comparisons/146403-sound-deadening-cld-testing-69.html. Years of testing in his garage, all with detailed graphs and waterfall charts -- that's a level of geek that few can rise to (and even fewer aspire to). Needless to say, I couldn't wait for the final results so I compared all the info to date a couple years ago, and sorted them in order of effectiveness but with an added vector of weight - I wanted the lightest, best performing product at a reasonable cost. Dynamat Xtreme seemed to win by a mile. the really cool thing was digging out that site from the depths of my browser bookmarks after all this time, and seeing that he finally finished his testing and came to the same conclusion. There are other better performing CLD product out there, but only if weight is no object. For an 02, Dynamat Xtreme is da bomb. For the best site for an education on sound deadening, what CLD is and how to use it, try https://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com/ Stay away from the roofing products - they are asphalt based so will off gas in your car, and are designed to flow when they get warm (that's what helps them seal against nail holes which is good on your roof but not so good in your interior). More importantly, there are other product that work better, cheaper, for sound deadening.
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  33. I used to store my cars all winter in a barn in upstate NY. First I learned that the electronic high frequency sound devices definitely don't work. What worked was a line of sticky traps all the way around followed by a berm of de-con pellets with an inner barrier of regular spring type traps. When I flew up from the Virgin Islands every spring the barn looked like a rodent Gettysburg the day after the war but none were nesting in the car
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  34. The central valley of California provides a pleasant, muted background to the crisp colors of the new car....
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  35. I've submitted my Epic Road Trips to Petrolicious, but I've been declined twice. One was a Vern story, Telluride CO, to Brunswick via Canada, 3,200 miles. The other was driving my '73 CSi to Monterey for the BMW Centennial Celebration and home covering 9,400miles via 5 National Parks & Mt. St. Helens.
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  36. In case anyone local has not see this yet... but my (Yale's) tii is on its way to the BMW CCA museum. I tried to make an event here, but I dont seem to be able to do that. https://www.facebook.com/events/181491735655877/ Yale Rachlin's (former editor in chief of Roundel Magazine) '74 2002tii will be heading to the BMW CCA Foundation as it is being donated to their collection. For those that don't know - this was his car for many years and is a very important car that represents club history. We are planning a drive from Duluth, GA to the Foundation in South Carolina. The drive should take a bit over 2 hours. Once we arrive, we will get a tour of the facility and I will hand over the keys to the car to the Foundation. Please note this caravan is open to any BMW, new or old! ***UPDATE*** We will meet at German Autowerks Atlanta @ 5938 Peachtree Rd, Atlanta, GA 30341 between 7am and 8:30am. Jeff has opened the shop for anyone that may have an issue with their car. There will be coffee and pastries if anyone needs something to eat. Around 8:30 - 8:45 we will be begin the drive up north on 85. There are a few folks that mentioned they want to meet us along the way, which is fine, just let me know ahead of time and I can give you my cell number to coordinate. I expect we will arrive at the Foundation in SC around 11:30am.
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  37. Nate Williams had asked about the BMW 1800 TISA widend factory steel wheels. These BMW 1800 TISA wheels were an option. I believe the BMW 1800 TISA came stock from the factory with the same wheel size, width and offset as a 2000 TI. Best regards, Peter
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  38. i did the big 3/4in airline version. if i was to do it again for shop that just used basic air tools and for filling tires, i would use the 1/2 in line version. easier to work with and bend. bigger diameter limits pressure loss over greater distance at the expense of installation work and higher price.
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  39. Ha. Bumping a really old thread. Transplant? Seems like a lot of work, and it probably won't look or attach right. If you are going to have it re-done, have it re-done right. I've used Craft Customs for 2 of my cars, and both times it came out perfect. Not just good. Perfect. Here's one: Here's the other: http://www.craftcustoms.com/
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  40. So some of you may remember my car got rear ended back in October...and after some deliberation, I eventually decided to take it to TJ for repairs and a paint job. I dropped the car off on November 26th, and after fully explaining what I wanted done, I was given a quote for $2000, plus $180 for a new headliner. Ramiro (the owner) told be it would take a month and a half. I translated that to 3 months, because, you know, Mexican time. I planned a visit to check progress the day after Christmas. So imagine my surprise when i get a call from Ramiro on December 21st (while I was in Cabo San Lucas, on vacation) telling me my car is done, and I can come pick it up....eh...¿Qué? So one month later, I went and got it.....wow. First, here are a few before and after pics: For $2000, you really cant go wrong. Yes, I have some over spray issues....but I'll address that!
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  42. 50 miles of Texas Hill country in the red rocket this afternoon...
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  43. First thing I got sorted was suspension which are Tii struts which were sent to Bielstein Motorsport in Germany...then some AP Racing 4 pots to fit inside 13" Ronal Kleeblatt wheels which will be shod with Toyo R888R's in 185/60-13.
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  44. OK, this was not an impulse buy because i had been 'on again, off again' searching for one of these for the past 2 years after seeing one on Bring A Trailer. reading the comments of folks who've owned these cars and just the mere shape of them was enough to pique my interest. in the meantime i had been outbid on a couple that i had the courage to put a bid on and they were not getting any cheaper. the only way i was going to possess one was to buy the rattiest one i was willing to pay for and then i had to have it shipped from one end of the country to the other; in other words it was an east coast car going to the Left coast; generally not the preferred direction to acquire a car. i must admit that to bring this car home i had to make room for it and the easiest way to do that was to let one of my 72tii's go. i chose to let go of the tii that i had spent considerable time repairing rust. the good news is that it is going to a former owner who had the car in the 1970's and had always wondered what had happened to it. it was on this forum that he found me and we'd kept in touch while i worked on his former car. i offered him the body shell and matching block with KF pump for a nominal fee. i chalk it up to my sheetmetal education so it's a win-win for both of us. so, now back to my early xmass present to myself. it is a 1960 alfa romeo guilietta spider veloce. the veloce version is the equivalent to the tii variant of an 02. it has more HP and was set up for racing with several tweaks including hotter cam, dual webers, bigger oil pump and oil pan, higher compression and other details. unfortunately, mine did not have the dual carb setup as it was removed sometime in its existence. i do have the proper weber dcoe2's for it and bought an earlier version of the correct intake manifold. one thing is for sure, new and used alfa parts for these cars make 02 parts seem very reasonable in comparison. i will have to up my game as far as sheetmetal work, but i have already committed to buying some good quality repair pieces as i want to speed the process along somewhat and the value of the completed car makes it necessary to keep the repairs looking OEM as much as possible.
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  45. "Son, one day I will be so honoured to give you my 02' - but until then, take care and appreciate this little gem." Merry Christmas to all my 02ers!
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  47. Have a good holiday season, everyone! Thanks for the thoughts, heart, knowledge and entertainment! Scott
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  48. A 1975 BMW 2002 in Mintgrun over Tan Interior, nice car, be kind, I know the owner. http://sandiego.craigslist.org/nsd/cto/5943208899.html M/A, Mark92131 Test Drive https://youtu.be/wedA8WcM4VA P.S. The only reason I am selling it is I am out of room, any and all offers from FAQ members will be thoughtfully considered.
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  49. +1 Jean Paul. Those (most) of us that have been around here since the onset of the Faq understood this as a matter of decency, but, over time, things have changed here & not all for the better.
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  50. not the right look for older cars...i'd never use them how about some 24" chrome spinners
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