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  • #34 Hyde Park 2002 @ The Mitty

    Last weekend we travelled across the country to participate in the 2018 Classic Motorsports ‘The Mitty’ races held on the beautiful Road Atlanta circuit just north of Atlanta, Georgia. This is perhaps the biggest vintage race on the east coast with over 300 entries.   The featured marque for this year’s race was Nissan/Datsun so the paddock was full of 510’s and Z cars. My 2002 was the token German in our paddock, which was also home to the cars of John Morton, the Grand Marshal for the event, and Adam Carolla.   Our weekend began on Thursday with the red-eye flight from Portland to Atlanta. With only 4 hours of troubled sleep our next challenge was morning rush hour traffic up I-85 through the heart of Atlanta. YUK!   We had been invited to visit the BMWCCA Foundation Museum which is located across the street from BMW’s mega-plant outside Greenville, SC. The museum is preparing to open their new exhibit called “The Icon,” to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the introduction of the 2002.   My car was invited to participate in the exhibit. I had shipped it back to SC a month or so ago and was excited to break it out for the weekend to go racing. I found a local race-prep shop, Vintage Racing Co., to transport the car from the museum to the track and to do a race prep on the car. The owner, Michael Eberhardt, was incredibly helpful and competent.     Our visit to the museum was great. We met the curator, Michael Mitchell, who is responsible for putting the exhibit together, as well as Scott Dishman, the Director of the Foundation, and Jackie Bechek, who is on the Board of the Foundation.   We toured the facility and saw how the exhibit is coming together. There are 24 other significant 2002’s being readied and set in place for the exhibit. Around the outside are photo’s, paintings, dealer signs, and a wide array of memorabilia associated with the development, manufacture, and introduction of the 2002. The exhibit is scheduled to open on May 18, 2018.   Following the tour we were taken across the street to have lunch at the Performance Driving Center. Our lunch included a quick tour of the school and a ride around the track in a M2 with Mike Renner.   It was time to head back down to the track and get registered for the weekend and find our car in the Road Atlanta paddock. Because of the huge number of entries HSR was utilizing both paddock areas at the track. The Racecraft truck was located in the Pro paddock on the inside of the Start/Finish straight.   Thursday morning began at 7:20 AM with a quick driver’s meeting. Since I have never driven Road Atlanta I had signed up for the Track Orientation Program. This program, run by Jim Davis, started with a van tour of the track. Jim talked us through car placement, turn-in points, landmarks, and a host of other helpful information. Following the van ride the TOP group had their own test session on track.   Jim’s tour was very helpful, but there is nothing like logging laps in your own car to learn a new circuit. Road Atlanta has several blind turns, most notably Turn 11. You approach the turn from one side of a steep hill, and then crest the hill and turn while passing under a bridge. The back side drops steeply while still turning down to the very fast Turn 12.   On my first lap I followed another BMW that drove straight off the track his first time through Turn 11. I almost followed him, but was going slowly enough to turn and stay on track. Believe me, television does not show how steeply the track drops as you plunge down to Turn 12.   On Friday our group had 2 practice sessions. My lap times got better each session as I gained confidence and familiarity with the track. My best lap in the first session was a 1:50.7, and 1:48.8 for the second session.   In the afternoon they put several groups together for a sprint race sponsored by Sasco Sports. It was a large group of over 50 cars, and I started 31st. The race was only 8 laps and with that many cars on track it was very hectic the entire race. I managed to pass a few cars and finish 28th with a best lap of 1:47.9.     I will say that the racing is more aggressive than we have on the west coast. I had a Porsche dive bomb me turning into turn 3 several times, as well as a few cars that blocked as I was trying to pass them, even on the straights.   On Saturday we had one Qualifying session in the morning and a sprint race in the afternoon. I was able to get my lap time down to 1:47.0 in the morning session which put me 32nd on the grid out of 44 cars. I was happy that my times were still improving, but not so happy to be buried so deeply in our group.   The race went better than I thought. I passed 6 cars in the first couple of laps, but got blocked by a lapper on the last lap and finished 28th with a best lap of 1:46.8. Considering the higher afternoon temperatures and some grease on the track from all the cars running, I was pretty happy with that.   We only had our feature race on Sunday. Several cars in our group either broke or left early so we had 21 cars take the green flag. I started 13th and again passed several cars in the opening laps. After 4 laps I found myself right behind Jim Froula in his 240Z and was able to stay with him until the checkered flag for a 9th place finish, and a best lap of 1:45.6.   Both Mary and I really enjoyed the weekend and our time in the Atlanta area. The people were warm and friendly, the weather was perfect, and the BBQ was spectacular. Road Atlanta has been on my list of tracks that I wanted to drive. It is fast, technical, and intimidating. It rewards lots of laps and familiarity.     The best part of the weekend was the fact that #34 worked flawlessly all weekend, and was driven onto the truck on Sunday night with no issues. He will get a well deserved rest in the BMWCCA museum until next January.   I want to thank Scott Dishman and Michael Mitchell at the BMWCCA Foundation Museum; Michael Eberhardt from Vintage Racing Co.; and Jim and Austin from Racecraft.

    NeueKlasseGuy
    NeueKlasseGuy
    Racing

    Seats - Restuffing Your Stock '02 Seats

    Written by David Duncan Wednesday, 07 September 2005 Repadding the stock '02 seats is a time-consuming but worthwile procedure. While most people will simply upgrade to some nice Recaros when their original seats have had it, many prefer the original look or simply can't yet afford to go with some replacement Recaros. For these people, restuffing the original seats is a great option. In my case, I repadded the front seats in my 1975 2002 for about $35 worth of foam and a few evenings of work in my spare time. The first seat I tried took about eight hours, and the second one was about six hours. Although it took a while, the results are great and I got to clean and condition the seats while they were out of the car. Parts/Tools Needed: Foam pads from upholstery shop or crafts store (more on these below) X-acto knife Needle-nose pliers Flat head screwdriver Phillips screwdriver FAT Phillips screwdriver for the side screws Sockets, spanner set, or crescent wrenches Optional: some 1/4" car headliner foam to put under horsehairs (if you are refitting them) For new foam pads, I bought some 2" foam from a fabric/crafts store. Measure your seats & backs and add a couple inches either way- you will be trimming them to fit. For me, it cost approx. $35, which isn't bad compared to the cost of Recaros. This was the very flexible upholstery foam...the kind you can squeeze to "zero." They had white and green, and I went for the green, which seemed denser. The thickness of the foam will depend on the condition of your existing horsehair pads and whether you want to reuse whatever is left of them. Mine were close to gone, especially the driver's seat, but still all one piece. I chose to refit the horsehairs under the foam, so I only needed the 2" thick stuff. If your horsehair pads are completely gone, then you will want to get thicker foam. Restuffing Procedure: The following assumes that all '02 seats are constructed basically the same, but as I mentioned my car is a '75. First you want to take the seats out, remove the rails, and then dismantle the hardware. There is a reason why this took so long, and that is because you want to be careful with your old seat materials! Pull the covers off slowly...they are attached by a series off metal hooks on the frame. Pry the hooks up to make it easier, and be careful, they're sharp 'n' rusty! I just used my hands to pull the vinyl back, afraid that pliers would tear it. Cut the foam to fit, with a little overlap. If you want (I didn't think of this till after I was done) you could get even thicker padding & custom cut the "wings" of the seats, for a more "Recaro" feel. I took some car headliner foam (about 1/4" thick and a few extra bucks) and sewed it to the spring frame to make a base for the old horsehairs so they wouldn't shed into the car. Refit the horsehairs (if you are re-using them), then place the foam into position. Putting the seat covers over the stuffing is a wrestling match, so get yourself pumped up! I managed not to tear the vinyl, but you should check your covers and their seams and make sure they're strong enough for the stretching. If they're dry & brittle, it might be a different story. I wasn't able to repad the headrests (the stems were pretty rusty & didn't want to move...and they are still semi-comfy, so I skipped 'em). Start with the front of the seat, and then work your way to the back, hooking along the way. You have to work with the material and the foam to keep it in place. When you're about three-fourths of the way back, grab the front of the seat and pull the cover towards the back, coaxing it into place. At first, I didn't think there was much leeway at all for stretching. Then I got a little brave and figured out how to coax the cover. It does give a bit...you just gotta work it along. By far, this was the most aggravating part; I found talking to the seat helpful! Before you put the seats back into the car, it's a good time to clean 'em up a bit with a brush and your cleaner of choice... not to mention a GREAT time to crack a cold one! Reassemble the rails hardware, then bolt the seats back into car. I used a couple of washers under the front rails to 'lift' the front of the seat slightly (provides a better driving support...a cool tip I got from the message board). If you want to try extra padding in the lumbar area, go for it. But the funny thing is that when the seats were back in place, the lower half of the seat back felt much thicker and supportive. I don't know how that happened, but the lumbar support was instantly built-in and noticeable! It was such an extreme difference at first, I didn't think that I could lean all the way back and drive at the same time! Shows how bad off the original padding was! Now, I sit upright and drive, and it feels GOOD! Anyway, one size of foam did the trick for support and comfort. Though I did think of getting 1/2" or 1" pieces to add to specific areas, I just went for one size and it worked out fine. It also followed the natural design of the original seat, which isn't exactly the most ergonomically fine specimen, but it's adequate enough for straight posture (and the '60s design rules!). I do want to try beefing up the bolsters sometime, especially now that I've done it before. It's a "crazy" project, but well worth it on that next drive...very comfy! I plan to do the rear bench next...and can't wait! I'm just amazed that I took on the project, and it came out nice! I still dream of Recaros, though. I hope this helps and if you have any questions, please post them to the Message Board! COPYRIGHT 2002, BMW 2002 FAQ, Rob Shisler and Steve Kupper. All Rights Reserved.   Additional detail for beginners like me (mataku527): - I used a combination of the green foam mentioned above and nu-fiber, which is reportedly similar to horsehair. - Detailed breaking down of the seats procedure below, I found this order to be best:   First take the seats off the rails, there are two 10mm bolts on the front and 2 on the back rails:       Remove the side covers on both sides.  They are quite fragile.  The upper is held by a small tap, pry it off carefully.       Remove the larger screws on the upper half:   Remove the wired connection from the upper half to the bracket.  For this part, it is easiest if you keep the upper half of the seat upright and open up the bracket away from the seat:   Pry up the circled part, it is only pressure inserted into the bar going across the bottom of the seat.  You have to line it up when reinstalling.:   Remove the spring clamp:   Once you do that, you can pull the whole bracket off and remove the rails.  

    hegedus
    hegedus
    Body and Interior 2

    Engine and Induction - Different Styles

    There were not many variations of BMW 2002 engines that came off the factory floor in Munich 40 years ago, but over the years, people have made some changes, and some things have remained the same.  Here is a collection of the types of engines and inductions you would be able to find in a BMW 2002 at your local car show.     This is what things are supposed to look like   1.6L M10 with Solex Single Barrel Water Choke Carburetor on a BMW 1600   2L M10 with Solex Single Barrel Water Choke Carburetor on a BMW 2002   2L M10 with Solex Two Barrel Carburetor     2L M10 with Kugelfischer Mechanical Fuel Injections   2L m10 with Dual Solex Sidedraft Carburetors (2002ti)   M10 with a Factory KKK Turbo and Kugelfischer Mechanical Fuel Injection   Engine Bay After work done by a Tuner prior to the initial sale   M10 With Alpina A4 Intake   Engine Bays with Aftermarket Induction   Carburetors   Weber Downdraft   Weber Sidedraft    M10 with 36mm Mikuni Motorcycle Carburetors   M10 With Lynx Manifold and Single Sidedraft Carburetor   Fuel Injection   M10 With BMW Electronic Fuel Injection from an e21 320i   M10 With BMW Electronic Fuel Injection from a 1979 e21 320i   Individual Throttle Body Fuel Injection   M10 With BMW Electronic Fuel Injection from an e21 320i and a Turbo   Engine Transplants   BMW m20 6 Cylinder Engine   BMW Euro m20 6 Cylinder Engine   BMW s14 4 Cylinder Engine   Honda f20c Engine     ...And something fun   Cardboard Engine     I would love to add more to the list, so if you have a similar style photo of something that is not listed, please add it to the comments.

    steve k.
    steve k.
    History and Reference 1

    Ipod-Controlled Hidden Stereo Into a BMW 2002

    Ipod-Controlled Hidden Stereo Into a BMW 2002 By Andrew Adams @ IE (a n d r e w a d a m s @ i e m o t o r s p o r t . c o m) -Let me be VERY upfront, I am NOT a stereo guy, none of this would have been possible if it had not been from input by several members here on the FAQ and on R3vlimited. GOAL: -------------------------------------------------------- A completely hidden, ipod-controlled basic stereo setup that retains the Becker head unit. Please note, if you can sacrifice a tiny bit of visibility for a better sounding system, look at the Eurotrash kick panels and woofer setup http://www.bmw2002faq.com/component/option,com_forum/Itemid,0/page,viewtopic/t,329333/ The speaker, wiring, and amp specifics is on the wiring diagram below, if someone want a full-size version of the diagram, please email me and I'll send it over. AUDIO COMPONENTS ------------------------------------------------------------------- -FRONT SPEAKERS: 4x6 2-way (Polk Audio db461 - RMS:4-40w 4ohms) -REAR SPEAKERS: 6x9” 3-way (Polk Audio db691 - RMS:10-100w 4ohms) -4-CHANNEL AMP: Rockford Fosgate Punch P400-4 (RMS: 4x50w 4ohms) -Ipod signal booster: JL Audio CL-RLC -RCA to ipod cable: Ziotek ZT1900666HC1 6-Feet Ipod 30Pin To Rca Stereo Cable, White -Male/Male RCA adapter (radioshack $8) -Long RCA wire -Amp & Speaker Wiring: 4 gauge: Rockford Fosgate RFK4x 4 AWG Amplifier Install Kit MATERIALS. ------------------------------------------------------------------- ...were by-in-large from Jo-Anns (my wife loves pointing that out to me everytime she gets in the car). -marine-grade black vinyl which surprisingly matched the original console vinyl perfectly. (for front console and front speaker panels) -open-cell foam (for rear speaker shelf) -Headliner foam (for front speaker insolation) -speaker cloth (for rear speaker shelf and front speakers) -black micro-suede (for center ash tray) -dynamatt (for rear speaker shelf) -wood (for amp shelf and rear speaker shelf) -interior carpet (for amp shelf) CENTER CONSOLE:------------------------------------------------------------ Re-wrapped in vinyl, on the center ash tray I used a dremel to whittle away at the retention clip to allow clearance for the ipod. Wrapped the inside with micro-suede for a nice touch. Made a hole in the backside for the ipod connector. Enlarged the stereo opening for Becker and made backside support arm (ran a new cheap speaker for the becker, this is how I get my radio). Finished off with this beautiful hand-made shift knob by David (I think it’s proportioned perfectly to the car, not diminutive like the alpina knob). (http://www.bmw2002faq.com/component/option,com_forum/Itemid,50/page,viewtopic/t,379457/ ) FRONT SPEAKERS:------------------------------------------- Driver’s side, I used the stock under dash panel, (Thanks to Ken Blasko). Cut out speaker hole wrapped it in vinyl, insulated the backside and stretched over some speaker cloth. For a better sounding front setup you can also also go with the awesome eurotrash kick panels here... http://www.bmw2002faq.com/component/option,com_forum/Itemid,0/page,viewtopic/t,329333/ Passenger’s side, made new panel as the stock piece was warped to badly. Repeated same steps as driver’s side. REAR SPREAKERS --------------------------------------- Basically copied what Marshall did, new rear panel attached speakers. Layered the dynamat, foam and speaker cloth. Micah gave me the idea to use bang matts for the rear speakers to sit in. The bang matts help to seal the rear panel keeping out fumes, plus you can’t see the ugly speakers jutting into your trunk. AMPLIFIER ------------------------------------------------------------------------ I made a little wood shelf that fit in nicely (covered in carpet), mounted the amp and signal booster to it. Drilled a couple of wire access holes and was set! Wired everything up according to the diagram….. The volume control knob is the old choke-cable knob on the steering column. Welded a piece of the old threaded cable end to the JL-supplied supplied adjuster, and wah-lah! The interior looks better than it has in a long long time, now it sounds better too! HINDSIGHT:----------------------------------------------------------------------- I have heard that Becker Autosound can convert the output signal of the Becker Europa to RCA which would mean I could hypothetically run the entire setup using the becker (basically Becker w/rca outputs -> JL Audio CL-RLC -> Amplifier. -> Speakers).

    AceAndrew
    AceAndrew
    Body and Interior 7

    BMW 2002 Differentials Guide

    Original Author: Jeff Ireland Differential Types - 2002 and 320i: Early 1600's and 2002's came with a long neck differential. These were phased out in early 1969. They were either 4.11:1 (1600) or 3.64:1 (2002). They are very rugged (heavy) and easy to come by, but not rebuildable due to the lack of available replacement parts. If you want to switch to the later short-neck differential, you must replace the entire subframe and rear suspension. This sounds tough but is actually fairly easy and the parts are readily available. All later 2002's and all 320I's used the short neck differential. These came in several ratios: 3.36:1 -- 2002 Turbo 3.45:1 -- some euro tiis and 6 cyl E21s 3.64:1 -- most 2002s and all 4-speed e21s 3.90:1 -- some 1976 2002s and all 5-speed e21s 4.11:1 -- all 1600s Of all these variations, all of them can be transplanted into a 2002. Variations and how to recognize them: All 2002/1600 diffs have 4 bolts holding the side covers and the output flanges are held in by a large central bolt. CV's are attached the output flanges with 6 - 8mm bolts. Early e21 ('77 and '78) 320i's have four bolts holding the side covers, but the output flanges are held in by a C-clip inside the diff. These diffs usually have 8mm bolts for the CV joints but some use the later 10mm bolts. These early diffs are the same width as the 2002 diff so no spacers are necessary if you are putting one in a 2002. Later e21's have 6 bolts holding the side covers and the output flanges are held by a snap ring just above the splines. You can easily pop out the flanges with a screw driver. These diffs nearly all use the 10mm bolts for the CV joints. These diffs are also narrower than the earlier diffs. If you want to put these into a 2002 you should use spacers to bring them to the proper width. Inner CV joints from a 1979 (and only a 1979) e21 are thicker and can be used instead of spacers if you happen to come across a set. Otherwise, billet aluminum spacers and the proper bolts are advised. Making the Swap: It's common to put e21 diffs into 2002's either to get the 3.90 ratio or the easily available 320is limited slip. The e21 diffs will bolt right onto the subframe and driveshaft. Just remove the 320i rear cover and install your 2002 cover. Please note the possible difference in widths I mentioned above. The final issue is 8mm bolts vs. 10mm bolts. If your new diff takes 10mm bolts for the CV joints, you have a couple of choices. Put 320i CV joints on the inboard end of the 2002 axle (if you can find 1979 ones, so much the better), or option two is to drill and tap six new 8mm bolt holes in the e21 output flanges. Clearly these need to be located with some precision and thus we offer the service at Ireland Engineering.

    Collinster742002
    Collinster742002
    Engine and Drivetrain 3

    Retrofitting an Electronic Flasher Relay

    Written by Chris Blumenthal Friday, 30 September 2005 Retrofitting an Electronic Flasher Relay By Chris Blumenthal Introduction Most 02 pilots have experienced turn signal problems. The dreaded indicator light "no-blinkie" and flash-only-once syndromes are among the most common. Another symptom is the fast-flashing indicator. Most of these problems seem to be traceable to excessive resistance in the turn signal/hazard flasher circuit. The '02 turn signal/hazard flasher circuit is notoriously sensitive to bad connections (both - and +) and poor quality bulbs causing too much resistance in the circuit. About 6 months ago, my instrument panel turn signal indicator started working intermittently and finally got to the point where it would only flash once when I first applied the turn signal, even though both front and rear bulbs were flashing as appropriate. I went through my whole system, cleaning up the contacts and grounds, and replacing a couple of brass base bulbs with the supposedly preferable "silver" base bulbs (available from the dealer and aftermarket sources from manufacturers Sylvania/Osram or Philips [others?]). When this didn't fix the problem, I replaced the flasher relay. This fixed the indicator problem, but the flashing (both the indicator and bulbs) was about twice as fast as the original and normal speed... not quite as fast as when there is a burnt-out bulb, but way too fast. Reminded me of the turn indicators you see on the typical death car or '63 VW bus. This just wasn't right for a dignified '02. The only direct replacement relays that I could find were marked "XS," with the X overlaying the S. It is my understanding that these relays are made by Siemens. A quality manufacturer for sure, but all of the OE relays I have seen were made by Hella. I have since tried a few different, used Hella relays lent by friends, but all have exhibited the original indicator blink-only-once problem. My conclusion: something beyond the normal and obvious is screwed up in my flasher circuit, probably in the wiring. I guess I could have lived with the fast flash problem, but it really bothered me. The Solution A few months ago, I happened across Zenon Holtz' web site. Zenon is an '02 brother from the Great White North (well, not so white in BC...) who has a nice BMW related web site, including a discussion (under "tech/troubleshooting turn signal problems") of using a generic, 3-prong turn signal relay in the '02. This got me thinking about using an electronic flasher unit in my '02. I knew from non-'02 related experience that electronic, variable load (resistance) flasher units are available for a pittance (<$5). Besides the low price, the other benefit of using for a generic electronic flasher relay is that external conditions do not determine flashing speed, which is electronically and internally regulated by the relay assembly. In fact, the "variable load" designation means that the flasher will function with different wattage bulbs, variations in circuit resistance, etc. Get a 3 prong flasher unit with terminals marked "X," "P" and "L." There are different spec units available. Littlefuse makes a unit designated "EFL 300" that is appropriate- if you cross reference to that, you will get the right part. The X terminal is the +12V input, the P terminal output drives the flasher indicator in the instrument panel, and the L terminal drives the load (bulbs). In the '02, the typical flasher wiring is comprised of a 4-wire circuit, including the following: brown (ground, of course), black/white (instrument panel flash indicator), green/violet (+12V) and green/yellow (load- bulbs). The brown ground wire is not used with the electronic flasher. The configuration of the male spade connectors on the flasher unit is very similar to a headlight connector. A female headlight connector with pigtails (available at most any auto parts store) works fine as an adaptor between the 3-prong electronic flasher unit and the '02 flasher connector. Note, however, that for a few bucks, many auto parts stores can provide a more precisely fitting plug intended specifically for turn sign flashers. Just solder .25" male spade connectors to the pigtails (use shrinkwrap to cover your solder connections, of course) and plug into the '02 connector. Connect the "L" terminal to the green/yellow wire, "X" to the green/violet wire, and "P" to the black/white wire. Conclusion So, why do this? (1) Endless, cheap source of flasher units; (2) flasher is unaffected by and insensitive to slight variations in resistance in the old '02 wiring; and (3) nicely paced, perfectly timed flashing (again, regardless of slight variations in resistance in the circuit). Although these flasher relays works with variable resistance, this setup will alert you to a burnt-out bulb by increased flashing speed like the original, non-variable load '02 flasher. Note: I am not advocating this as a solution for poorly maintained '02 flasher circuits. Use good bulbs, and keep your grounds, connectors and bulb contacts clean! If you have any questions, feel free to post them to the Message Board! Updates provided from http://www.bmw2002faq.com/topic/85984-signal-flasher-upgrade-easy-to-do-what-a-difference/

    hegedus
    hegedus
    Electrical and Ignition 13
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