• Announcements

    • steve k.

      Introducing FAQ Memberships   04/17/2017

      I would like to introduce everyone to the FAQ memberships. A fun way to fund the site and to contribute for those who are interested.    Everyone starts as a Solex Member.  This membership is free and not much visible is changing (I limited the personal message storage to 150).   Kugelfischer membership.  As a reward for your donation of $20.02 per year, you will not see any external advertisements, the site will look cleaner and run a bit faster. You will also get a couple of BMW 2002 FAQ Stickers.   Turbo Membership.  As a reward for your donation of $50.02, you will not see any external advertisements, the site will look cleaner and run a bit faster.  You will also get unlimited Personal Message storage, ability to create Private and Restricted Photo Albums. You will also get a couple of BMW 2002 FAQ Stickers and a Bottle Opener.   Alpina Membership.  As a reward for your donation of $100.02 per year, you will not see any external advertisements, the site will look cleaner and run a bit faster.  You will also get unlimited Personal Message storage, ability to create Private and Restricted Photo Albums, and an ability to upload Movies to the gallery. You will also get a couple of BMW 2002 FAQ Stickers, a Bottle Opener, and discounts on our accessories at the store.   There is also a fancy title that comes with each membership.  
  • Recent Blogs

    1. Today I took the car over to my regular mechanic, who put it up on a rack so I could look underneath.  We poked and prodded and looked around for rust and leaks.  Almost no rust.  Three areas that will need to be addressed: a small rust spot in the box-beam between the gas spout and the gas tank, a quarter sized spot in the front quarter panel in front of the drivers door and a slightly larger spot on the passenger side of the front air dam under the bumper.  Wow.  Lots of grime and oil, but no other rust.  

       

      As for leaks, there were a LOT. 

       

      1.  The driver's side axle hub was leaking brake fluid from a place that didn't look like it should be leaking anything.  This is probably from bad drum brake piston seals.  Since the brakes are weak anyway, I'm ordering new cylinders rather than just a seal kit.  Ray pointed out new cylinders for $20 each at BluntTech, which is about what the rebuild kits cost elsewhere. (Thank you, Ray!)  I also bought new flexible brake lines from Ireland Engineering.  I'll take a good look at the original steel hard brake lines when I get under there to clean things.  Many people upgrade to the 250mm brake drums from the original 230 but I'm not going to do this just yet.  

      2. The differential is leaking. It is possible that this is just oil trailing back from the engine, but I don't think so. 

      3. The brake master cylinder and/or the brake booster are leaking.  That should be fun.  

      4. The lower oil pan gasket seems to be leaking.  The good news is that I won't have to drop any of the suspension to get to this like I would have to with my newer BMWs.  The bad news is I don't have a lift so I'll be doing this under jackstands.  Messy!   

      5. The valve cover gasket is leaking.  Of course it is. 

      6. The timing chain cover gasket may be leaking.  I'm going to just clean that area up and replace the valve cover gasket at first.  I'll need to pull the valve cover off again if the timing chain cover IS leaking, but that' not the end of the world.  

      7. The water pump is leaking.  Yes, the water pump is bad and needs to be replaced.  I hope it comes with a gasket.  

      8. Something around the oil filter is leaking.  In newer BMWs, the oil filter housing is attached to the engine and the gasket commonly goes bad.  I'm not sure what the deal is with this engine because I don't think there is a separate housing.  I'll look once I get the area cleaned up.     

       

      As if all those leaks aren't enough, there were a few mechanical issues as well.   

      1. Gearbox linkage.  The gearbox linkage has a lot of play in it and something slams against the transmission tunnel when shifting.  In 4th, I can pull back on the stick a little and feel the linkage rubbing against the drive shaft.  I started a thread to solicit suggestions. This will be interesting to fix.   

      2. Pedal box cover missing.  It is really strange being able to look down at the accelerator and seeing straight through to the ground.  A foam cover is missing...at least.   

      3. External speaker wire?  The previous owner ran wires for the whopping 4 inch speakers on the back deck along the OUTSIDE of the car.  Clear, gold and silver stranded wire like what you would use in the house.  See picture below. 

      4. CV boots split.  Yup. normal.  

      5. Steering box play.  Most of the suspension bushings were surprisingly tight, but the steering box has a little play in it.  That will be interesting to fix...  

      6. Bounce, bounce, bounce.  The original, original shocks, struts and springs turn the car into a bit of a bounce house inside.   I've already ordered Bilstein B6 struts and shocks and will be ordering Ireland Engineering stage 1 springs.  This should also lower the car about a.5 inches. 

      7. The steel wheel fronts look great, but the backs are rusty.  I'm planning to put new wheels on the car, but want to keep these. Hopefully they can be reconditioned.          

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      The missing pedal box insulating cover.  Oil, oil everywhere!  

       

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      The front edge of this box beam has a hole in it.  This is a really common rust area in all BMWs.  

       

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      Greas and grime on the CV joints.  Note the odd clean spot on the axle caused by the...SPEAKER WIRE!  Hanging down.  Wow.  Also note the very wet brake drum housing.  Bad piston seals.  Oddly, most of the bushings seem to be in decent shape, but I'm going to replace them all anyway.  Lots of work, but the increase in driving confidence will be worth it.  

       

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      The odd loose shifter linkage issue. Clunking the tunnel and rubbing against the drive shaft.  I started a thread on this.  Should be interesting to fix....

       

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      Leaking differential, I think.  This might be oil trailing back from up front.  I'll tackle this much later, although I absolutely want to change the diff fluid soon.  There is no record of that being done. I'll bet it smells horrible!    

        

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      Up front, the oil pan looks new!  No oil under it either but there is some along the trailing edge.  

    2. I was really hoping the car would make its debut at the PCA Air and Auto Classic 8 show today in Virginia Beach. Some last minute rain delayed finishing work and my restoration guy (who was taking the car on my behalf) decided to opt out. I can't fault him for that.

       

      Since I'd paid for the registration, my wife went to the show and enjoyed the sites. She was kind enough to send these to me - looks like quite a few 2002s made it out, which is always a good sign.

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    3. So, this week I found time to finish machining my 36-1 teeth into the stock pulley and cast two more pieces for the EFI conversion.

       

      First is a bracket to hold the crank sensor from DIY AutoTune:

      m10_efi_crank_sensor_installed_1.jpg

      m10_efi_crank_sensor_installed_2.jpg

       

      Second is a small plate with a port to connect to a Suzuki Swift IAC (idle air control) valve. I'm not 100% sure that this IAC will allow enough air flow for the M10, considering it's from an engine with half the volume, but I had one easily at hand, so I'm giving it a try. I'm going to mount it to the underside of the intake using two pre-existing bosses and a custom bracket.

       

      m10_efi_iac_port_installed_1.jpg

      m10_efi_iac_port_installed_2.jpg

       

      There are two smaller ports underneath my IAC inlet plate. One goes to the fuel pressure regulator, and the other I will use to provide a MAP reading to the ECU.

       

      These two cast pieces really could be a lot more attractive and look more like "car parts" but right now I'm going for functionality and ease of production. It's amazing how quickly you can turn a piece of scrap aluminum into a usable part. The IAC plate took just 90 minutes from start to finish.

       

      I think my next step will be building the wiring harness, which will probably take a while because I will be ordering new connectors and pins to make it from scratch... I don't like splices.

       

      Jesse.