Blogs

 

If at first you don't succeed

Started out with the vague notion to make a phone holder.  I already have a design for a clip to hook on to the lip of the dash from another project.  So, how hard can it be?     Modeling this guy was straight forward. The piece tilts up and in toward the driver.   After 14 hrs of printing, I was rewarded with this mess.  It turned out that the part printed as one piece was not did not have all the printed layers in the ideal alignment to take any amount of mechanical stress due to the shape of the part.   Plan B.   Broke the design up into pieces.  Many many hours later since I still am horrible at 3D modeling.  Each piece can be printed individually.  Total printing time should be about 4 hrs.    Many many prints later for fit check since material shrinkage was next to impossible to predict.   Voila, the clip worked perfectly.  The holder held.  Life is good.

Tsingtao_1903

Tsingtao_1903

Introduction

Noticed my Blog wasn't showing up until I added an entry, so I copied the description to here.    After sitting for most of its life its time to give this gorgeous low mileage example a restoration worthy of the record books. I purchased this car from the second owner. He bought it back in the early 80s while living in Germany before driving it to Italy where he lived. When it came time for him to move to the US he had trouble selling the car and decided to bring it to New York with him where the car ultimately sat until it could be legally titled once it was 25 years old. By then the owner had swapped in us market side markers and an American speedometer as requested by the DMV at the time. The odomoter reads just over 30,000 miles and from my overall inspection of the vehicle I believe it to be accurate. Being a North East car that sat in a mechanics backyard for a number of years a full restoration is in order and will be completed using many connections I've formed with some of the best automotive talent in the USA. Today marks the official project start date, and the car is headed to my good friend Matt's shop, Beaver Built. The project begins with major surgery- rust repair. At least one subframe mount will need to be cut out, and many more spots including the usual suspects will be discovered and fixed as the project progresses. Following rust repair the car will be shipped to me in California where I now reside and be stripped to a bare shell for a clean start to a very lengthy project. I have some very wild engine plans but the car will retain a very mild appearance with practicality improvements integrated as cleanly as possible.    Be sure to follow my Instagram for more up to date updates @rocanmotor as well as my friend Matt's shop @beaverbuilt for all the nitty gritty. I'll keep this post updated as much as possible.   I apologize to all my 02 friends here for my long hiatus... Between starting my career and making a few big moves in the past three years I've had to put the 02 projects aside for a bit. I've worked on some stuff in the meantime but I've never really been happy not having an 02 in my life.   Let the fun begin. 

Rocan

Rocan

Jumping the Shark

So in trying to remove the diff from the drive shaft, I was poking around the underside of the car and discovered something fairly alarming. At some point, the nuts holding the transmission brace had rattled off, and the whole brace had fallen onto the exhaust. It wasn't that far off, not even the length of the studs extending under the car. Maybe half an inch total lower then it should be. However, I think we all know that an exhaust should not be holding your transmission in the car. Discovering this, I made a snap decision to just pull the engine. 
    Here's my logic... Since I purchased this car, I've been less than impressed with the plumbing and wiring. It always felt like a rush job. The previous owner told me that he brought it to a shop in his area to have them complete those two areas, and they clearly just phoned it in. While it is functional, the car did run after all, it is ugly and completely unservicable. For example, if the shift linkage failed, the exhaust would have to come out completely to reach it. In order to remove the exhaust, the subframe has to come out. This is because the exhaust is one piece front to back, a removable mid section would prevent this. Same with the wiring, the radiator fan wiring ran a full loop of the engine bay for no apparent reason, and every single wire coming off the relay was the same color. These are details that make working on the car a nightmare. 

So time to redo everything. 

First the hood came off. Side note, Jesus Christ the 2002 has a heavy hood. Like surprisingly so. You can see I started moving things around in the engine bay. I cut the exhaust off the car underneath, but the bolts from the header to the midsection were seized, so it's stuck together. I can't drop the exhaust out the gap, so it'll have to come out after the engine. It is free from the car entirely though.        Below are some examples of the things that drive me nuts about this swap. The wiring is zip tied to coolant hoses, relay blocks are shoved where ever they'll sit, dead systems just remain in the car for no real reason. I found quite a few wires sitting in the engine bay that just generally lead no where on either end.          These zip ties were all removed from coolant hoses. Almost all of them were tightened to the point where they were digging into the hose. In many cases wiring harness portions were also ziptied to the hose, and then the whole lot was zip tied to the chassis. Look, zip ties are useful in moderation. But this engine bay basically fell apart when I started removing zip ties.      I finished the weekend removing the intake manifold. A hateful job that was 100% designed by someone who had a grudge against people with big hands. I spent far too much time removing that manifold from the engine. I wanted to do it in the bay to give myself more room to extract the engine, but I borderline regret doing that now. It ate up hours. The cooling system was removed as well, and the wiring harness was labeled and separated from the engine as best as I could. I'm sure we'll discover how good a job I did when the engine comes out.      Once the engine is out, it's time for some clean up. I'll be cutting off any brackets that are not needed, plugging any holes that serve no purpose, and sending the car off again for some fresh engine bay paint. I won't call it a shaved bay, but... trimmed? Yeah, sure trimmed bay. I also ordered something I'm extremely excited about, this part is the crowning jewel to this car. It'll realize the dream 2002 for me. I'm being intentionally vague until they get in, so in the mean time, here's a picture of my dog.   

benzintinte

benzintinte

• More BMW 1600ti Parts Arrive-Car Off To The Shop!

Most of the parts have been gathered for the project (or at least a critical mass), and yesterday the car was off to the shop. My mechanic is about a 45 minute drive one-way from our home, and with no one to help with the shuttle, I loaded the car on my trailer for delivery. (Photo 1 below).    Upon arrival at Richard Rushton's shop in Puna, Hawaii, I am reminded of why this fellow is popular among Big Island vintage sports car enthusiasts. My car got put in a side garage, because his main work area was taken by a beautiful, Meissen Blue Porsche 356 "C" coupe, in for regular maintenance. The car belongs to a friend of mine, came from the Willhoit  stables in California, and is stunning (see Photo 2 below).   While swapping cars around, Richard showed me his retro-mod Austin-Healey Frog Eyed Sprite. It looks tame enough, until you tilt the bonnet. The motor is from a 1977 320i, with engine mounts, oil pan, pump, and oil pick-up from a 2002 320i. Twin Weber 32/36 progressive downdrafts provide the atomized gas. The motor has a Delta camshaft, and BMW performance exhaust system. The brake booster set-up is Fiat. The transmission is a five speed from a 1981 320i, and the car has a 3.64 differential. First gear winds to 40 mph, 2nd gear 70 mph, 3rd gear 90 mph, 4th gear buries the speedometer at 120 mph, and Richard says fifth gear is too fast for driving! (see photos 3, 4, 5, and 6 below)   New parts for the 1600ti vary from used OEM to what is available. Conner Elkington at Vintage Autobahn came through with the proper, angled velocity stacks for the Solex PHH 40's. While realoem.com does give part numbers for these stacks, I found (as did jgerock) that the numbers are not embossed on the stacks, only "L" and "R" on each part. Photo 7 shows a picture of the new (old) stacks. Thanks to all for helping with the search. Conner got these stacks from a set of carburetors that were on a 1600ti at some time, but I suspect the trumpets are the same for 1600ti and 2002ti.   Rocky Srl, the eBay Solex parts seller in Italy (eBay user name alfa 1750) came through in top form with all the carburetor parts I ordered. The plan is to convert a set of Solex PHH 40's, now set up for a 2002ti, into all the proper jetting, venturi, and rebuild requirements for this 1600ti application. I got two complete rebuild kits, plus main jets 120, pilot jets 50, idling air jets 100, and 30 mm venturis. The service was fast from Italy, and order complete. I'll post later as to how these parts actually work out in my carburetors! (See photo 8, below).   Tsingtao_1903 helped me tremendously in locating two, rare items for this project. He found me a Kienzle "look alike" clock for the dash, and repaired/wired/bench tested for installation. He also sold me an original steering wheel from a period BMW TI or GT.  See photos 9, 10, and 11 below.   A complete set of 1600 engine gaskets came from Walloth & Nesch in Germany (photo 12) and Steve at Blunttech Industries supplied new rubber bushings for the front suspension, and new tie rods. (see photos 13 and 14).    Last but certainly not least, among all helping me, Slavs is my rock! He's an unbelievable source of information on these early 1600 cars, and is helping me with OEM front and rear sway bars, and a variety of other parts and wonderful advice. Not sure I'd be doing this project without him. Thanks, Slavs!   All for now, and please enjoy the photographs. Aloha, Robert (Mahalo to you too, Ray_)!        

BritshIron

BritshIron

 

Project speed ramping up

This fall the tent that I used to store the ‘73 shredded. I moved the car to the shop I co-own now and have decided to stay late on Fri and Sat nights to make progress on the car.    Knowing that this car will be my “hot rod” I’ve been acquiring go fast parts for it. So far I have a set of Bilstein HDs, a Weber 38/38, an IE 292 cam, a 3.91 LSD, an IE stainless header, ansa full exhaust, a 320is steering wheel, and high bolster bucket seats from an ‘84 Ford SVO.    Since I moved the car to the shop I’ve been picking at when life doesn’t keep me from staying late.   I installed a replacement L/F floor pan from WN. I also fabbed and installed a patch panel from the A-pillar to the pedal box and wrapping around the bottom of the pedal box.   Over the last few weeks I’ve been working on the replacement L/R floor pan- repairing holes, replacing the outer mounting flange, and trimming it to fit the car.   Yesterday I also installed the 38/38 Weber and modified a 2bbl air cleaner to fit.   

VWJake

VWJake

 

2018 Wrap Up / Tally Up

Figured I'd throw up a post with my car status as of the end of the year, list some high-level things on my to-do list this year, and an updated "how much I've spent" listing.   Wrap Up Shortly after I painted the engine bay, I cleared out the garage and pushed the '02 in, so I could work on it in the cold Michigan weather   I removed the wiring harness from the engine bay (wish I had done that before painting, was easier than I thought it would be), installed the IE pivot bearing/sleeve for the booster, hooked up the brake master, and ran Andrew's cunifer brake line kit in the front.   Got the car up on Quickjacks, pulled the driveshaft off, and ran the brake line to the rear T.   Also test-fit Andrew's headlight covers       Lowered the car back down and dropped the engine in:     I then used a Harbor Freight engine bar to keep it from flopping over, and then raised it back up.   Things to do for 2019 (in no particular order) Install RHD Engineering lightweight flywheel, new Sachs clutch, and Getrag 240 5-speed trans. Bleed brakes Install Speedhut Speedo + Tach in my instrument cluster with CF vinyl + Dash cover (Teaser pic for my next blog entry*) Repair passenger side floorpan + heater hole in firewall (bottom lip is rusted away) Make new engine bay wiring harness using a Delphi connector Start engine for first time Rebuild rear subframe/suspension/brakes Install Limited Slip Diff Gut trunk (what little remains of it), install 16 gallon aluminum fuel cell in stock location, run new fuel line, install EFI pump Finish interior Enjoy my '02 for the first time ever   How much I've spent so far   This has all the engine rebuild stuff, so I'll start with the total and then itemize below that.   Previous total - $10,006 Engine rebuild - $5,027 Front Susp/Brakes/Rust Repair - $2,723   Running Total - $17,756   And I'm probably forgetting stuff.   Engine Rebuild Costs:   Front Suspension/Brakes/Rust Repair:       *Blog entries are not guaranteed

xr4tic

xr4tic

Carpet & Seats

Here are the photos of the new GAHH carpet installed. The seats are back from the upholstery shop with new BMW 'horsehair' pads & headrest escutcheons in the front and either an older set of unused 'horsehair' or new foam pads in the rear. Included older pictures of the interior to show the color difference. 

adawil2002

adawil2002

 

Rear seat delete carpeting install

I've gotten quite a few compliments, including esty herself, on my rear seat delete carpet installation. I basically followed her instructions on her website and the FAQ article by Mlittle, but I thought I'd document my experience here. It came out great.   First, I installed the carpet kit for the 'front' of the car. You've got to have the rear seat bottom upright done anyway to begin the rear seat area. Next, I lined the back part of the seat back with EZ Cool. While I was at it, I used a high speed recirculating saw to lop off those hooks that the rear seat back hangs onto. I also had run all the wires and installed the battery in the under portion of the back seat and used the seat belt bolt for my ground wire. Even ran the speaker wires so I wouldn't have to bother later. Might as well get all that stuff done beforehand.   My first move was to glue down the parcel shelf. This is a nice and level area and gives you a good reference line for the back carpet. I then used the carpet seat bottom piece and traced it onto a piece of luan plywood, about 1/8" thick. Cut this out with a jigsaw and test fitted in the car. Nice!   Basically, there's just a ton of test fitting throughout this whole job before gluing. The wheel humps took the longest because they're the first piece of the puzzle to glue. I'd put all the pieces in place, adjust, take them out, put them back, look, adjust etc. What I found was that the back carpet piece was too long and extended past the little protruding shelf that the bottom board is supported by. Because the wheel hump pieces also were too long, these pieces overlapped each other making a double layer of carpeting for the bottom board to push up against. This wouldn't do as it would leave too much of a gap in the back bottom.   Getting the wheel hump pieces just right took some trimming at the bottom. Too much and the bottom piece and board wouldn't cover the cut. Too little and it would create a double layer of carpeting. It was trial and error but once done I held them in place with some makeshift clamps and refit the whole thing one last time. Bingo! (BTW, I used a heat gun carefully on the back of the carpet to pre-fit/bend the wheel humps)   Holding the wheel hump pieces in place I outlined their position with magic marker so I knew where to spray the glue and where to put them back on. Finally I could get going on the rest of the pieces.   The rear piece has the parcel shelf as a reference as mentioned, but I also made sure the rear door cards were in place so that it got 'centered' as well. Once in place I bent the top portion down and sprayed, making sure it aligned well with the parcel shelf. Once stuck, I bent it up from the bottom and sprayed glue down there as well. Don't worry about the carpet being too long. Your bottom board is going to butt up against it and push it in.   Putting the board in place I pushed on it as hard as I could and drew pencil marks underneath where it overlapped the the rear seat upright. Since the upright is about 1" wide, I simply marked a line 1" further in and screwed 1x2's along that line. A test fit proved to take a hard push and a rubber mallet to get it in place, but it turned out fitting nice and snug.   esty gives you some excess vinyl for the front part of the board to trim it out. Some glue and some clothes pins and it was good to go!  I never even bothered gluing the bottom piece to the board. Why bother?   A minor detail was the curve where it meets the rear door cards. My carpet and board left a small opening where I could see down into the bottom of the seat area. With some spare Gobi tan vinyl I glued some onto the metal down there and voila! Blended right in.   All in all it took me about 5 hours. Sounds like a long time and it was, but the reward is well worth it!   Thanks to esty for a quality product!

NYNick

NYNick

Boring but Necessary

This weekend marked very slow progress, but progress all the same. I spent some time removing bushings, which is a very smelly process. It started with finally removing the control arms from the car. I had to borrow a ball joint separator to get the tie rods off. Also, as it turns out the M20 is very much in the way of getting the driver's side control arm off. While I eventually did manage to jump on a breaker bar and get everything loose, it wasted a ton of time. Perks of owning a hot rod I suppose.    One thing I noticed, is the control arm bushings were toast on the passenger side. The car has had some wicked pull under braking, something I tried to iron out with new pads/rotors etc. But this was almost certainly the reason for it. In fact it was so bad on the bushing picture below, I could tear the bushing apart by hand. For the rest, I resorted to burning.        I installed all of the bushings on the passenger side, which I later realized I have to undo. But here's photos of that process. The first (horrible, and underlit photo) is the new radius arm bushing. For any of you attempting this job, and have to do this bushing, it is very much a pain to remove. I used the radius arm for leverage and eventually was able to pry out the stock bushing. The 2 piece poly unit went in much easier.        After I pressed in those bushings, I felt it was a little bit of a waste to have the arm looking that grimey. Eager to test out the paint I had picked up the other day, I decided to test it out on the other control arm, and rear subframe push rods. I'm using Rustoleum Rust Inhibitor, and will do a final coat in glossy enamel. However yesterday was one of the two cold, rainy days we get here in Arizona. So despite my best efforts, it was far too humid and cold to properly paint.       The photo is pretty poor, which is par for the course in my thread. They were soaking wet with paint there, but did eventually dry an even coat once I got them in the garage where it was warmer. I decided to wait to lay down the final enamel coat due to the weather, I didn't want to make things worse, even if it would all be hidden under the car. Sometime this week I'll pull the other bushings from the control arm back out, and give that a good coat too. But for a test, things went about as well as I could hope. It should prevent any future rust or harm.    I then finished the weekend out burning out the remaining trailing arm bushings. A miserable process, but necessary all the same.      This week I'm waiting for a pretty important part to arrive in the mail. Once that arrives, I can place yet another order with Ireland Engineering, and hopefully I'll be set to start putting the car back together. I miss driving it a lot, so the anxiety of having it sit in the garage all torn apart is starting to get to me.  
 

benzintinte

benzintinte

 

Well - two steps forward - 2 back

Thought I’d post an update.    Luckily my buddy that’s helping me is willing to redo rework when we are not happy with something. So the painting continues.   Paintedbthe calipers red with VHT and VHT high heat primer. Not a fan. Sanding them back down and going with the VHT “Real Orange”   Interior and bottom of the car has been  sanded, cleaned and painted with POR15.    It never goes as fast as you think it will but, I have not lost faith.    Adding a little more Italian.  In that I’m still accumulating goodies as well latest addition- pictured below. Brand new MOMO prototipo!   Hand made in Italy. Seriously beautiful! And a nice compliment to the Ferrari Grigio Medio paint.    Happy new year 2002 friends.          

Dionk

Dionk

New Year Catch Up

I've fallen a bit behind in maintaining this build thread. So here's everything up until today.    New Caps   So after losing one hex cap on the road a while back, I've been trying to get a matching fourth or source a new set. When you're picky, it's the biggest pain in the ass. I couldn't come up with a single V1 SpinFab small thread cap, although I'm keeping an eye out for one still. I contacted SpinFab directly, and they said they have moved on to the V2 design. If you look at the base of the hex, it has a slant to it as opposed to the flat base of the V1 cap. It looks fine, but I couldn't buy just one and have it be mismatched. So I ordered a full set in raw finish, and took it to a friend of mine to get polished. It was a pain to replace the whole set, but I guess these things happen. And it'll be nice to run waffles again, I prefer covering the lugs on RSs personally.    Before         First and foremost, a huge thanks to my friend Nick (@nhammon) for polishing these. I've mentioned this before, but he's in the process of building a wild show Miata, and has been polishing brake lines for weeks now. So he was familiar with the process of getting the shine out of these caps. I probably would have mucked it up somehow, so it's great to have friends willing to help make sure things turn out perfect. So, definitely go give him a follow. I've tried to get him to start a build thread here, but that's been in vain.    For those of you that follow me on Instagram, I teased another car coming soon. In short, I traded one car I have in the garage (non-op), for another car that runs and drives, which will free up the garage. That means my Roundie can move into the garage, and I can put it up on jack stands for an extended amount of time and actually get some real work done. I'm getting close, and I'm really excited.   Winter Build So the time has finally come to tear the car apart. I started the process yesterday after one last cruise. That was mostly to get as much gas out of the tank as possible, but it seemed like a fitting conclusion to chapter one of the 2002. At this point the car won't be back on the road for a few months I imagine. I started tearing apart the 2002 in my garage, and then it'll be towed over to a body shop for rust repair in the trunk. From there, it's off to my fabricator to build the tube core support, and get all the radiator upgrades taken care of. Then back to my garage for bushings, ball joints, etc. I'll also be finishing what I can of the interior at that time.    I don't have a ton of space, but it's more than I have had in the past. So I'm stoked on that.   Starting point. Dirty, rusty, not so hot.   Reminder that this shock tower is the main reason we are doing this.   I started by removing the tank. The debris there is actually mostly dirt and a foam seal under the tank. But there is a fair but of rust too.     After some creative shuffling, the 2002 now has a garage spot, and I can wrench in peace for the next few months. So far everything has gone smoothly, but I anticipate a few hiccups in the repair process. I'm actually very encouraged by my tear down. Originally I thought my differential support was toast, there was a thick layer of rust under the bubbling paint. I took a wire brush to it, and a layer of rust came off and it was solid underneath. The bottom side of the car is likewise totally clean. I will be taking everything down to bare metal this week to ensure that it is as solid as it appears, but it is very encouraging that my diff support seems to be totally ok.    On the flip side, I did find a totally rotten section underneath the fuel tank. Fortunately this is significantly easier to repair then the diff support, so in terms of trade off, I came out way ahead. I'm hoping for a speedy turn around. After this round of build, the car will still be ratty, but have a strong chassis and nice interior. Hard to complain about that. If all goes to plan, the car will be ready for some longer road trips this coming Summer.   On a Whole, This is Good   So I did a small amount of grinding to see what we were truly working with. Keep in mind this was done in about 30 minutes just on what was visually the worst areas of the trunk. I learned two things. I do not need a new diff support, and the shock tower is much, MUCH worse than I thought. On a whole, this is good news. to replace the diff support, the body shop would have had to drop the subframe, measure carefully, cut most of the trunk out. It would have be extremely expensive. I took my grinder straight to the visually worst part of the diff support, it had a very thick layer of flaking rust under the paint. What I discovered underneath was solid metal. Perhaps a little pitted, but not rotten through. Underneath the car, the beam is completely clean. I had a few people look at it, to make sure I'm not going crazy, and there simply isn't any cancer on the rear diff beam. This saves me likely thousands on the repair job.    That's a shitty photo of what was visually the worst rust in the trunk since I got the car. Underneath? Seems to be ok. Simply resealing the trunk floor seems to be the go to move here. No need to replace what is otherwise workable sheet metal. I will continue to grind every bit of paint off to make sure it's truly solid, but everything I checked so far has come up clean. Except...     The passenger side shock tower was what prompted all of this. The small grinding we did earlier revealed a hole or two. When I took my new angle grinder to it this time, I discovered some pretty catastrophic rust. This is bad, but not beyond saving. Fortunately I do have that sheet metal for this exact tower. Likewise, I seemed to have lucked out on the drivers side shock tower as well. Zero rust on everything I've brought down to metal.    This weekend I'll finish fully stripping out the trunk and getting the car ready for transport to the body shop. The tow truck comes to get it next Wednesday, and I'm hoping for a quick turn around time. From there it comes home for me to do all bushings and suspension refresh, and makes its last trip to my friend's fab shop for the core support work. We're getting into the thick of it.      I also made the impulsive decision to start stripping the interior. I want to put in that black carpet, so everything is coming out so I can pull the carpet, and when it gets back I'll be swapping that out. "While I'm in there" I'll also tackle some sort of radio solution. That'll at least put the interior in a happy place for me.   We're Off!   Keep in mind, this was supposed to happen after SEMA. Delays and some mistakes brought us to this point. But as of yesterday, the tow truck came to collect to the 2002 and it's at the body shop.       That's about the most low car friendly tow truck I've ever seen in my life. Love it, super easy getting the 2002 on and off. To recap, the 2002 is basically just going in for the passenger side shock tower, and some gas tank surround metal. The diff support was just fine, and frankly why over spend if the car doesn't need it? Hoping for a relatively quick turn around, though I'm not 100% sure what the timeline is. Once it comes back, it'll get a suspension and brake overhaul, and then finally off for a new radiator support and cooling system upgrades. There is light at the end of the tunnel now.   Cut Up   Stopped by Axis the next day, and they already had started chopping up my trunk. It's tough to see with this photo, but if you look below the fuel filler neck, that entire section of floor is cut out. It was rotted enough to warrant just making a new one. Tower was cut, rust treated and will be patched. Since the damage was limited to the one tear, it didn't make sense to completely remove everything.    This whole section will be cut and replaced. It is located under the filler neck in the trunk. Water seeps in through the seal and eventually rots out this portion of floor. Non-structural, but disgusting all the same.     Given the progress he's making, the 2002 will be back pretty soon. I have to prep the gas tank to go back in, which I've been lazy about. I'm shooting to get everything quickly reassembled, but we'll see how it all goes. Word is there is going to be another StanceWorks open house in January/February. It'd be cool to have the car back together by then and take it out for that. But that is only possible with absolutely no delays. So we'll play it by ear.   Steady Progress   Axis sent me some photos this morning of the progress. Since I have little else to share, I thought I'd post them here. I haven't seen the car yet in person, but the photos being sent to me are promising. Given the speed they are working, I think I'll have the car back very soon.          A small but notable update, I now have black carpet in hand. So the red will finally be removed, and the interior will be one step closer to being complete. I've been complaining about the red carpet since day one, so it is kind of nice to finally know that is going away for good.      Paint   What can I say, Axis Paintworks works considerably faster than I can keep up with. Last night they sent me these photos. I've arranged for the tow truck to pick the 2002 up on Friday, so it'll be home and it'll be time for me to rip into the car. Excited to have the car back so fast, I honestly didn't think it would be back for a month or so.        You can see the difference in texture, I figured ultimately it didn't matter since the trunk is closed and I'm the only one who will see it   A recap on the damage and repair.   Alright so I guess it's full steam ahead on everything else. I've been slacking on prepping the gas tank and all that, but now I don't really have an excuse. I suppose the big objective now is to figure out about how long it will take me to finish everything I have planned. With the car back this Friday, I really want to have the whole car done in about a month. No idea if that's possible or not yet, there tend to be snags.   Puzzle Solving   Well I brought the 2002 home over the weekend. Opted to use a truck and trailer instead, which proved to be a very lengthy process when getting the 2002 up on the trailer. It took nearly an hour of winching and pushing to get it up there, but eventually it did go. In my effort to save a few dollars, I killed a ton of time. Probably not worth it in retrospect, but what's done is done.      As soon as I got home, the car went up on jack stands, and the tear down process began. I'm starting in the rear of the car, taking care of all the changes I wanted to make there. So I started dropping the subframe. This is normally a fairly easy process, that was made infinitely more complicated by the center exhaust. The biggest problem being, it is one piece from the headers to the muffler tips. Rather than trying to drop the exhaust, I decided to work around it. This meant a lot of creative shuffling of parts, I disconnected the axles from the diff to shuffle around, and then eventually the entire diff from the subframe. I may have left it just suspended on the exhaust, as it is a pain in the ass to remove. It will come out later, but that's a problem for future me to solve.          So here we are. Rear end is disassembled. Not pictured, I did break down the trailing arms and subframe so they're bare, and started scraping and scrubbing all of the grime off. I'm not going for powder coated perfection, but there is no harm in giving everything a good scrub down. This isn't a show car by any means, and I try to keep that in mind to prevent myself from going over board in changing things. My instinct is to make everything brand new, but that's money poorly spent. Clean and safe is more important right now.    The goal over New Years is to break down the front end, and start prepping the rear subframe to go back together. I'm waiting on a new diff gasket to arrive in the mail, and will need to order sway bars for the car this week. So that, unfortunately, will be the source of some delay. Otherwise I'd be ready to put the car back together today.

benzintinte

benzintinte

 

Steering Box Bonanza

When I rebuilt my front suspension, I noticed that the steering box adjustment was pretty much all in. The adjustment screw was almost flush with the top of the lock nut. Since I have a right hand drive, I thought that I had better make a start in finding a replacement since they are no where near as common as left hand drive versions. The right hand drive steering box is a direct mirror image to the left hand drive. The machined worm gear spiral  actually runs in the opposite direction as well - I can’t believe that BMW didn’t just arrange the same steering box on the opposite side of the car rather than get ZF to make an exact mirror copy.    After posting a ‘want to buy’ on the UK board and Australian Facebook, I struck lucky with a good box from the UK with lots of adjustment left and a smooth action. This was bought for a quite unreasonable sum (plus shipping) and sent to Adelaide. Unfortunately, I was in the middle of planning an interstate move and a 9 week tour with a camper trailer, so I had little choice but to pack the new steering box and ship it on to Sydney where we were moving to.    The (fast) drive from Adelaide to Sydney in my car reinforced to me the need to get the steering box changed out. While less noticeable when puttering about town, sweeping bends at 80mph we’re a bit unnerving as I waited for the steering to catch up with the input I had just given it. The rest of the suspension (all new) has performed well but the steering had some room for improvement.    I got a seal kit from Walloth & Nesch which also comes with a paper gasket, a new pitman arm nut and a tabbed lock washer. I know that I could get the seals individually for a lot cheaper from a bearing / seal supplier based on the dimensions on the seals but I saw the benefit of getting a complete kit. The pitman arm came off first, I used a puller and some judicious application of heat from a MAPP torch after spinning off the nut with my long breaker bar. The arm wound off with no dramas once the heat had expanded it and it lost its grip on the shaft. The box came apart easily, revealing the worm gear and sector rollers as perfect, no galling or obvious wear.  The ball bearing cages were intact and no obvious wear on the races or balls. The shims were scrubbed clean with a scotchbrite pad. The housing was cleaned up and given a coat of ‘silver galv’ paint before the new seals were gently tapped into place with suitably sized sockets.  The marks on the shaft were aligned with the marks on the case and then the box was reassembled. 300ml of clean SAE 90 oil was added and the box worked back and forth a bit to distribute around the bearings.      Removing the old box was relatively straightforward, though I did elect to remove the whole drag link and steering idler so that I could get the Pitman arm in the vice and give it a good whack with a BFH. I could have used a ball joint tool but I was conscious that I didn’t want to damage the rubber seal on the base of the ball joint so the ‘hard whack’ method was required. Removing the lot was the next logical step as I didn’t have enough room underneath the car for a good swing of the hammer.      I didn’t do anything to the steering idler apart from cleaning it up and topping up its oil. The RHD idler was common with NK and CS coupes (as are a number of RHD only parts). The unit is actually adjustable but I left mine alone as there was no appreciable play in any direction and yet it turned very smoothly. I am going to assume that is OK as I can’t find any instructions as to how it may be adjusted.      I renewed the flex joint after cleaning up the parts. The braided strap for the horn appears to have been working long term by just rubbing against the heat shield (RHD joints have a heat shield to protect the joint against the heat from the exhaust). I added a crimped loop of wire that I protected with heat shrink and installed within the heat shield to protect it.      The new flex joint is quite a bit smaller than the original (no date mark unfortunately, marked Jurid and SKF). I am hoping that there is no compromise in terms of strength longer term.    You can see the comparison between the old box and the replacement in terms of how much adjustment is available. I will give the replacement box a tweak once I have the car back on the road.    When I get a chance, I will tear down the old box and see what state it is in. It definitely felt a lot more rough than the replacement. I am hoping that the worm and roller are OK as I will get it rebuilt with new bearings if it is possible since they are getting pretty rare now. I will update this post with whatever I find.   

Simeon

Simeon

 

Fuel and rollers

Decided on different wheels. Since this will now be my "wild" car I don't want to be ruining rare-ish period correct wheels, just in case. So I picked up a set of Tire Rack's private label wheels that have just about the perfect measurements for the 2002.

  The fuel system is all set and ready to go in as soon as it gets nicer outside. For now the car is still sealed up.


Spyke

Spyke

Time for a Pro? or do I go?

Ok so I am having a problem.  I can set up the car just fine, part throttle, full throttle, cruise is just fine.  When I come off the throttle,  the revs will drop, and either catch at about 800 rpm stumbles or almost stalls to 100 RPM then recovers.    When I take my foot off the gas, it pins full lean, even if I force the system to still pump fuel. So it is one of two things   1) My spark control is bad or something with the ignition that I can't figure out.  Everything has been gone through, there is one thing I need to check with Holley tech support.  I have an adapter to run the tach.  I am not sure if it should be on the MSD now that the Sniper is in or run off the "Tach out" on the Holley. From all that I can read, it doesn't matter.  Losing spark on the way down would cause a false lean.    If anyone knows if something that will fool the Holley, please let me know.  The Holley can control the timing but I would have to heavily modify a Holley dual-sync dizzy to fit   It needs a 12V square wave output, not sure If I can get there with a trigger wheel.  I am looking at the megajolt software tonight.     2) The other thing is it is registering a false lean for another unknown reason, be it a combination of head, header, intake etc... that will require an engineer to diagnose, and expertise far beyond mine. New intake gaskets, header,and a new O2 sensor after the Holley one broke (will get replaced under warranty), cap rotor, plugs just to make sure that it isn't something simple, has been done. Voltages look fine, worked with my NA setup.    The problem, as far as I can tell, is that the false lean, causes the EFI to dump fuel, then it dumps too much, on the way down to idle.,  floods it and causes it to stall and stumble.  Can this be tuned out? I am not sure.     Maybe I am reading this all wrong, but it is the only thing that makes sense based on the fuel flow and the data and what I can cobble together.  Any other theories are welcome.     It does idle nice, if I am out of closed loop, it is just every time I come to a stop, the stalling is just too annoying to overlook.      Below is the data.    On the left side, I forced open loop so the Closed loop comp stops trying to fix this.   On the right, I have closed loop, and you can see the idle peak then drop.  The red is RPM.         Below you can see how CL comp chases the spike lean in the AFR.                        Sniper Log hunting idle.dl BMW2002 v 14 Reboot.sniper.info.txt

Dudeland

Dudeland

 

• A Lifetime of Sports Car Collecting--First Tribute Car

I've been interested in sports cars since I was very young. The pictures below represent a few of the more "midlife crisis" points in time. I started with British cars, graduated to Porsche, and then came back to "BritshIron." (Misspelled, because folks already used the correct spelling). I thought you all would be interested in pictures dating back to my British car years.   This BMW tribute project has captured my interest like few other projects have in the past. Thanks to all in BMW 2002 FAQ for helping. Also, I'm gradually learning about how to carry out a blog on FAQ! Aloha, Robert

BritshIron

BritshIron

 

• Brief History of the Donor Car, Parts & Project Plans

For those interested, you can go to the following Bring-A-Trailer link, to see the car as I bought it in December 2017:   https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1968-bmw-1600-6/   The story I got from the seller was that he was frustrated in trying to deal with getting the correct rear glass, and that's why he sold the car.    This is chassis #1560629. It is a numbers matching car, but has had it's share of owner preference work. Someone put knee trim on the car years ago, and the seller did an upholstery job that suited his tastes. The steering wheel is wrong, and the gauge cluster is not period (but I've got a "silver dollar" cluster being restored now). Mechanical clutch replaced with hydraulic, and brake booster changed out for newer system, Libre wheels (but original spare). Bottom line is the car seems to represent a nice (thank goodness, nearly rust free) platform, but will never be an all original show winner.   The seller had owned the car for two years, and bought it from Craig's List in his home town of Santa Maria, CA. The seller owns an upholstery shop in Santa Maria. The story gets a little murkier prior to Craig's List, but it apparently sat for a number of years at Bavarian Auto Haus when that business was in Shell Beach, CA. The car came with original books and purchase records from when new--original sale from the Peter Pan dealership in South San Francisco. After I bought the car, Carl Nelson at La Jolla Independent BMW worked on the CV joints and replaced the axle boots, as well as put new window glass in the car, as needed. Then, the car was shipped to me from San Diego to Hilo, Hawaii.   After restoring the dealer-supplied A/C system (thanks, Ray), I have decided to build this car into a 1600ti tribute. I found NOS ti pistons in Greece, and carburetors/intakes/linkage, air can, and other engine bay bits from a BMW enthusiast in Washington State. Solex PHH rebuild parts are on the way from an eBay seller, alfa1750 (Rocky) in Italy. The NOS rear badge is from a parts house in Uruguay, and the front badge is a reproduction from the UK. And Trieu build me a Kienzle clock (see his recent blog)! Hoping for sway bars from another FAQ'er. Please see pictures in this first blog post. Time schedule for the project is to get started wrenching in January 2019. We will be doing a complete engine rebuild, in conjunction with fitting the new pistons, carburetor system, and SuperSprint exhaust (headers, center resonator, and tailpipe).   A number of FAQ'ers have helped me tremendously with the project and parts hunt thus far, including Ray, Slavs, Conserv, bimbill, Mark92131, halboyles, jgerock, zinz, Oldtimerfahrer, Tsingtao_1903, and others. I know I've left some out, apologies. Way out here in the Pacific Ocean, this project would not be possible for me without the help of folks at BMW 2002 FAQ.   I've got a great mechanic (in his 70's) who is also a dear friend, but this fellow does not use the Internet! He's got a wonderful, one bay shop at his home in Puna, Hawaii. One of the pictures below shows a black Sunbeam in his shop, so you can get a flavor for the place. One of my challenges is to get him all the latest information from you all, and thus translate that guidance to the end of his ancient tools! He does have lots of experience with a variety of BMW variants from back in the day.  I'll be posting pictures of the progress of the car in this shop, as time goes on. My intention is to keep this blog going with timely posts, until the car is completed.   This is my first blog of any kind, so your patience is appreciated. What I am hoping for is lots of feedback and advice on this upcoming project: to create a 1600ti tribute car from my current 1968 1600-2. Many of you have already helped, and I apologize if any of the pictures or information are repetitions from previous forum posts. Most importantly, I've only been gathering parts thus far, so I'm hoping you all can guide me and my mechanic along so as to avoid unnecessary mistakes, and otherwise do the work in the most trouble-free fashion possible. I am reminded of the old saying "Perfect is the enemy of the possible"--this car will never be a perfect representation of an original 1600ti, but I intend to do what is possible given the current platform, and what is practical to do out here in the Hawaiian Islands.   Thanks for following along and participating in this adventure! Robert    PS. I've explained to my wife what I am doing, and she seems interested. That said, I've captured an image of the dog's face after carefully explaining the project to him. Milo is most definitely not interested, and won't be until maybe it's time to go for a fast, air conditioned ride! RPS            

BritshIron

BritshIron

Jewelry

While working today I took some pics of all the plated latches and components in their proper place.  Details are coming together and looking good

Djthom

Djthom

 

Ti clock tribute

The Ti clock is a rare thing.  It is essentially a Tii clock; but, with the chrome bezel and the script Kienzle.  A faq member was looking for one...   I have a look-a-like clock.  It has the klunk-tic-tic movement, the chrome bezel and the script Kienzle.  However, it did not have the correct wire harness, the shroud and the mounting hardware.   The shroud was modeled and 3D printed.  The thumbnut was also modeled and 3D printed.  I added the extra large chamfer to help with the blind installation.  The 3-pin clock connector was also 3D printed to make the harness. The clock housing was drilled to accept two 8-32 pressed in studs.  I made a little brass die to help with the studs installation. The clock was oiled, assembled and being run on the power supply to check timing.          

Tsingtao_1903

Tsingtao_1903