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VSR Update 8/1/2018

Paint touch up is almost complete. Nose didn't need to be repainted after all. Both rear quarters on the other hand needed some attention. Next up is to re-align the transmission as Vern's guibo has started to crack after only 6,700 miles! Plan is to rotate the engine counter clockwise to remove the guibo stress, re-alighn the driveshaft and hopefully get more fan clearance from the lower part of the radiator. Currently can't fit my pinky finger between the fan and radiator it is that close!

adawil2002

adawil2002

 

Wing work (part 2)

I’d say that’s a major improvement!!  Wow!!!  Just waiting in one more part from restoration design. Then we will get the old girl back home for more of the stuff I can do on my own. It’s really exciting to see progress!!

2002VT

2002VT

Interior

The first couple of years I've owned the car I just drove it. Didn't really touch anything. Then I came across a e21 Recaro driver side seat on craigslist for $40. It was trashed but for $40! The guy I bought it from turned out to be a super nice dude who's become a friend. Watch out for Austens Superchaged M3 swapped e30.   I spent the next year lazily on the lookout for a passenger seat at a decent price and eventually one popped up on ebay. Price was reasonable so now I had the set. After being blown away by local reupholstery pricing I sent them out to Dave at Aardvarc. I knew wanted cloth/vinyl but it was hard to source fabric online. I wanted something salt and pepper looking, like TV static, and found what I thought a great match online. It ended up being a little less peppered than I wanted but overall was happy with the results. Here's pic of my son enjoying the comfort of freshly reupholstered Recaros.     I also had Dave make a matching rear cover that my Father in Law and I threw on.   My next little project was redoing the shot and smelly sunvisors. I used the original vinyl to trace out a pattern then I cut and sewed up new ones from the same fabric I used for the seat. I think if I was to do it again I would do the seat fabric on the backside only and some sort of off white vinyl on the side you see when they’re up so you only see the fabric when the shade it flipped down. I think my positioning of the clip must be off as well since part of the shade bumps the headliner when flipping it down.       My next bigger project was the center console. The vinyl/plastic material had tons of holes through the side from fixes throughout the years. It seems screws through the side was how it came from the factory. I was determined to hide all the fastener. My goal was a simple but tastefull console that had the modern convenience of a CarPlay touchscreen display. I had a bunch of Mahogany veneer left from a table refinishing so I wanted to use that also and stain it very dark/close to black while still letting some woodgrain show through.   Here's my original console.   I dissasembled it all. Wasn't hard since it was falling apart anyways and was left with the 2 particleboard side panels and the hardware that holds it together. I wrapped the panels in some thin foam, Super77'ed on that I had lying around. I bought some nice looking vinyl from the fabric store and wrapped them back up, stapling in areas I knew wouldn't be visible once it was all back together. It looks like I wasn't the best at documenting the entire process but here's the few pics I have.       Making the new face was the most difficult part. I did it twice because I wasn't happy with the first one. It basically involved carboard aided mockups to get the angles how I wanted them to fit the new Pioneer unit I had bought. I wanted it to all have a clean look so routered out some of the back of the stereo opening to allow it to sit flush (it's ugly but you don't see it)       I also wanted to add a couple of VDO gauges and move the harzard light to nice spot right in the middle. When I got the gauges I ordered I cut holes for them but wasn't happy with how they looked so I sent them back and bought the chrome ringed version. (Yes that's a turbo gauge. No I don't have a turbo... yet) The new gauges looked awesome but apparently were a hair smaller than the ones I had drilled holes for so there was a gap. Not wanting to redo the face panel I searched and searched and found that camera ring adapters would take up the space perfectly and not annoy me too badly. I also made the pocket a little more functional but adding an inset tray lined with the seat fabric and a phone holding slot. The wiring plug for the hazard light just barely reaches in this position. Here was the end result.     New carpet. The carpet in the car was smelly, dirty and old. Time to go. I ordered a new set from Esty and she even had a really great Salt and Pepper color. The install took me a few hours but it was really pretty easy and I'm happy with the result. If you're thinking about getting carpet from her, do it. Better shots of the console installed and the rear seat reupholstery here too.           Other things done so far are new speakers in the kick panels (there were already giant holes cut in there) and a new rear parcel shelf with inlayed hidden undermount speakers. Don't have a pic of that right now.            

Meanwhile...Back at VSR

Vern is back at VSR to have stone chips touched up and a few other things attended to. Poor guy really took it on the chin and nose over the past 6,700+ miles since April 17, 2018. Spoke to Mario yesterday and went over the work plan. Nose is being repainted, other paint flaws will be touched up and wet sanded. Doing all this because I am having the paint treated with Opti-Coat Pro, a two stage ceramic coating. https://www.opticoat.com/page/opti-coat-pro     At the BMW CCA O'Fest Concours, where Vern placed 2nd in Classic Super Clean. A judge, after the awards, helpfully pointed out what specific areas needed attention. I am still waiting for the judging notes/sheet from Paul Cain, the BMW CCA Concours Chair.

adawil2002

adawil2002

Dream Wheels, on the Dream Car

Catching Up   It's been a while since I've updated, as I tend to maintain my StanceWorks build thread a little more diligently. But I wanted to bring my '02 FAQ blog up to speed as well. Since I last posted, I've made some more changes to the car. A couple months back, I took the Roundie to a local show at FourTillFour. The day before, we gave it a very light buff. The results were pretty impressive, given how shot the paint is.    You can see the before and after here.       After that, the temperatures here in AZ started creeping up pretty rapidly, and I pretty much stopped driving the car. I started looking towards my 4 lug swap so I could run my BBS RSs, and decided a brake upgrade was in order while I was in there. I did some digging, and settled on piecing together my own budget BBK, using Volvo 240 front calipers, VW Mk4 rear calipers and a mix of E21 and Mk1 Golf pieces elsewhere. I ordered what I couldn't source, and pieced together the whole kit. I had the stock rear hubs machined down, so they fit in the rotor top hats, and pressed new studs in.        Note how the stock hub does not fit in the rear rotor.   Post machining. Took quite a bit of material out of the hub.   Excuse the bag, but the hub now fits.   So I did all this work, and was set to do the big brake swap and go back to four lug. But after spending a good 15 minutes trying to scrub the grit out of the 240 calipers, I decided to do things right. Instead of throwing grimey parts on my 2002, I'm going to be getting the calipers all powder coated, and rebuild them so they're nice and fresh. In the mean time, I've just left stock equipment on the car, as fortunately I had a back up set of stock front hubs, new stock rotors and pads.    I then tackled (finally) finishing the BBS RS rebuild. I had some hiccups with the wheel bolts, my torque wrench had fallen way out of spec. As a result I had over torqued everything, and only realized this when one bolt snapped. In retrospect, I did think it felt like it was taking too much force, but didn't bother to try another torque wrench. So all 120 bolts came back out, and I ordered new hardware. I borrowed a Snap On torque wrench and had them all back together in one evening. I ordered some Hankook RS4s and got them mounted up. The car came with a similarly size (195/50r15) Kumho A/S when I bought it. The M20 pretty easily over powered those tires, and frankly they never were confidence inspiring. The RS4 might be overkill for a street tire, but I like the tread pattern and the additional grip is welcome.      Yes, I went overboard with the silicone. I trimmed the excess off later.    Upside of daily driving a Fiesta ST, I can haul wheels easily.    Then, out of impatience, I started tearing apart the hubs one evening to test fit the wheel. My initial test fit revealed that the stock studs were far too short for my redrilled RSs. I also discovered the the passenger side, rear hub was completely frozen on. It wasn't an ideal situation to be working, Monsoons kept hitting here in Arizona and I work outside.        If you look closely, you'll see the nuts barely thread on. It also revealed the rear suspension was far too high.    I then struggled with the whole wheel stud situation for a day or two. I knew a needed longer studs, but not too long. Otherwise it would interfere with the BBS waffle. I tried a couple different options, but finally settled on the most ridiculous option. I ordered Ireland Engineering's 70mm studs, and then cut them down to the length I needed. Is this the most efficient way to do things? No, not at all. But it did work, and now the wheels can safely be bolted to the car.    Stock vs. IE 70mm studs.   Now I have the opposite issue, these are too long for the waffle to fit.   Shitty photo, but you can see that they were cut down to spec.    Now I was ready to retackle the whole hub swap. The drivers rear, and both the fronts went very smoothly. I was done in no time at all. That frozen rear axle nut remained an issue however. I broke two breaker bars, one ratchet, a pair of vice grips and went through a full tank of MAPP gas, a can and a half of PB Blaster, a half can of Aero Kroil, and bent a metal extension pipe. I was starting to lose faith that I could get that nut off and would have to cut it. After struggling in my driveway for a full day and a half, a friend dropped by with a monster of an impact gun, and zipped it right off. I definitely loosened it for him... There were not photos from this process, because it was largely uninteresting. But afterwards, I took the 2002 for it's first spin on new wheels and took a few photos to celebrate the occasion.              Note that I finally attached the missing knee-line trim piece. It's the little things that make a difference. The car drives a million times better. I took some of the pre-load out of the rear suspension, and suddenly it didn't ride like it had 100k springs in it anymore. There is no more wicked wobble in the front end, and the car legitimately has some serious grip with these RS4s. Before the car would roast tires on command, now it just hooks up and scoots. It's not like the M20 is pushing any serious power, but more the all-seasons on it before were just garbage.    Up next, I really need to refocus my efforts on the cooling system. I think a bigger radiator, fan and lower temp switch are all in order. I also want to tackle more chassis issues, like the lack of front sway bar, bushings and just basic items like tie-rods and such. The car is so much sharper than it was when I got it, with just a few basic tweaks. I think it has potential to be a really fun canyon car, but I have to make sure it's safely up for the task. For now, I'm just going to enjoy how good this car looks on some shiny BBS RSs.  
 

A few pics of the heater box mid overhaul.

Overhauling my heaterbox.  Repairing cracked plastic....wow it’s fragile.  Don’t ask me how I know.  Also if you doing this and reusing your fan blades on a new motor. A Quick way to determine which way the fan blows is to attach it to your drill before punching out the center shaft to affix to new motor. Also not that I read a post somewherethat if you reverse the wiring the fan may blow in a different direction...so there’s that way as well to be cautious of.     Did i I mention this 50 year old plastic is fragile..  F&#& !!

Dionk

Dionk

 

Piloti Competition Driving Shoes

Cindy bought me a pair of Piloti Competition, specifically made for driving. Thin reinforced sole takes strain off ankles, knees and balls of feet. After driving Vern 730+ miles to Pittsburgh in a day with these shoes, I wasn't sore or limping like with Vans, Converse Allstar (low & high tops) or Sperry Top Siders.   https://piloti.com/collections/performance/products/competizione-red-black-white-performance-racing-shoe?variant=36592510477

adawil2002

adawil2002

 

Floor pans- new used parts

Since the right rockers are now whole again and the quarter panel is still off I decided the next order of business was the floor pans. They are all almost a total loss. LR: RF:   LF: The plywood does a good job of covering the bulk of the hole.   Removing the rear seat support was a quick task as only the welds on the top of the tunnel and the sides of the rockers were holding it on. Started by removing the outer seat rail. I then used a body saw to trim out the rotten RR pan from just behind the subframe push bar to the flat portion below the front seat. The flange attaches to the rocker is still clean metal so I left that. I cut just below the seat belt mount and the seat rail on the tunnel. I removed the donor pan and test fit/trimmed it until it fit well enough to weld it in with all of the ribs reliefs matched up. I left the leading edge and about 5” back from the front loose so that I can match it up with the rest of the panel still to be removed the the ‘69 floor. The welding isn't finished in this pic, but that pan isn't going anywhere for sure.     In my opinion the worst part of the floor is the LF. The frame rail essentially doesn’t exist anymore, the pan is only held on by some rust scale under the seat. The A-pillar is pretty bad, the outer rocker is just a few flakes of iron oxide and the inner has some major damage.    Tons of work still to come, but it's getting stronger every day.  

VWJake

VWJake

Body work begins!

When delivered in Hayward, California for body work I got busy searching for the needed metal. Between BMW directly and other online vendors, I found new rockers, new rear wheel arch flares, and a new section of the front nose all to be grafted into the car once the rust was cleansed.    To identify the rust, the car was stripped down to bare metal:     During the strip, some body panels needed to be replaced. I found a nice set of used Baikal blue doors and a replacement passenger side fender.     The body shop sealed the bare metal as they went:     The body work was finished over the course of 5 weeks and 100 hours. Then she was loaded up and dropped off to me. I will now work on removing the powertrain, the glass, and all old seals before the final prep can begin for fresh paint!   (There are a few areas that need more body time. The rear side reflector holes are to be welded up, and the front nose hasn’t been fully finished.)     IMG_9801.mp4

oh2ryan

oh2ryan

How this all got started

I owned many o2’s back in the 70’s i also own a 1972 known as “square Grouper “. my first Bmw  was a 1600 that I purchased back in 1971 and drove from west palm to as far north above Quebec as possible . This is a picture from that trip. there have many more Bmw’s And always used for road trips and camping. Many of  My bmw pictures from back then the car was just in the back ground. I never knew that someday these cars would become a cult in them self’s . 34 years later I decided I should work on my bucket list and I always said I’d do another road trip in a o2. the decision was made to purchase a perfect o2 roundie with sunroof. Easy decision, tuff search. Tough, dispiriting , travels across country meeting liars and cheats, every sort of bondo filling low life shithead. then I found the perfect car for me 1972 Bmw 2002 , roof and completely original, every last piece and most of all No Rust. That car was transported to palm beach where the complete interior was removed and cleaned, the complete brakes, suspension replaced and then it was shipped to Ray Korman who rebuild engine to stage II and had the car repainted. Stunning ... i have driven it to the Vintage 3x, trips down the blue ridge parkway and total 9,000 miles of fun. Now for this car I’m starting the Blog about. late one night I find myself looking at a BAT auction of a 1968 bmw 1600 from a estate sale. The details listed a inherited car that had been parked with 43,000 miles ( yeah sure, ....)  too good to be true and the car was listed and displayed in the worst manner. It was advertised as a project and although  it stated that all parts were included and there was only a little surface rust, it looked terrible and it appeared to have lots of rust red everywhere . The BAT critics are brutal and rude bunch most ard lurking in the background trying to show their knowledge thtough criticism . they tore it apart and I think caused interested parties to Not Bid. i found it interesting that no one could see past a few trivial matters and know the value of this car. looking at the location ( Brasstown North Carolina ) and knowing the geography I  suspected that all the red rust color was really Red Clay and it was.   After a bat battle I found myself the owner of yet another rust free o2. And now I’m blogging

Road trip

Road trip

 

PVGP 2002 Parade Lap

Vern, Cindy and I on the Parade Lap during the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix, Sunday July 15, 2018. Photo by Kyle van Hoften. Missed the World Record for the a Parade Lap by 28 '02s.   The other pictures are of the line up and a few shots Cindy took while on the Schenley Park Road Course. The last pic is the rest of the '02s returning to German Hill to park.

adawil2002

adawil2002

 

She back

Long story short, I have my car back and have been working to the best of my wallet's abilities. A bunch of new stuff so here's pics

IMG_20180509_140935312 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180514_182857752 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180519_144608021_HDR by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180519_144757229 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180519_145610696 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180521_173100395 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180529_195018860 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180603_160943884_HDR by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180603_161054821 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180615_180754798 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180623_181947812 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180701_175154215 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180709_200549239 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_20180714_103527851 by Gregg, on Flickr   IMG_5017 by Gregg, on Flickr

Spyke

Spyke

 

1 Step Forward 2 Steps Back

Been a while, figured it was time for a little update.   I have been chipping away at her for the past few months. I ended up redoing the mounts on the rear subframe because I wasn't happy with the wheel placement (this is the first step backwards). I just need to test fit it the next time I work on her. The cylinder head for the engine is with Bimmerheads in CA, so no new news on the engine. But I did start getting to some of the body issues... I noticed in the front foot-well corners there seemed to be some rubberized coating/built up material around it. I started sandblasting it and it ended up being rubberized coating over fiberglass patchwork... (this is the second step backwards). So I went ahead and busted the patches out and this is what I found   I went to work cutting out all the spot welds and ended up with this... (this was the one step forward)   Went further back on the outer rocker because the PO put a terrible patch on it and didn't match the contour of the rockers.    Lastly, I got some goodies in the mail!!!   Reason why I haven't made much progress (other than only working on it for select weekends) is I bought a truck! So it has been sucking some of my time to just get it road worthy.      Clearly, I am a gluten for punishment...   That is all for now    

Serendipitous

So I was hoping to have more done to the car before this post but I figured it's been a while, maybe it's time. The project has come to a little bit of a lull and I'm hoping that making this post and reminiscing on the project might motivate me to get things done. There has been a fair amount done to the car, with the help of a friend I was able to knock several things off the build list. (This post is a small portion of the things that have been done since last time)   A few pleasant surprises happened while I was installing various parts on the car. The Kirkey racing seats and brackets bolted right up to the stock holes. I actually ended up moving the driver side back an inch or two to give myself more leg room (6'2"), but other than drilling the 4 holes no modification was needed. Then we mocked up the Takata racing harnesses. These bolted right up to the stock location too! I'm using the 4 point snap harness that uses eye bolts to mount them.     The motor was a little more of a pain in the butt to get mocked up though. I used a spare subframe, motor, trans, driveshaft to get everything lined up and clearanced. My motor is still at the machine shop, but the transmission came back. I took a wire wheel to it and I think it came out beautiful. It's a Getrag 245 with an M20 bellhousing (off a 323i).     I'm following @AceAndrew's build very closely and he mentions that the hole for the shift lever needs to be moved back some. Well without even trying or measuring it was determined the Ireland Engineering 5 speed selector rod was the correct length. Easy peasy! It's the AKG tunnel mounted short shifter, a very very nice piece but also very overpriced in my opinion. #becauseracecar     A few more of the details on the body got done. Mocked up the @Ireland Engineering turbo body kit. Got the roof rack from @LimeySteve which looks awesome. Mounted the fuel cell in the trunk as well as the ATL gas cap (waaaayyyy too much money spent on that thing, but I'm very happy with the result).     I also got a few things done while I was bored at home, wait that's a lie nothing is boring anymore now that there's an almost toddler running around the house. I flocked the glovebox. It could have been better, but for a first time flocker it came out pretty OK. Super, super easy to do and there was enough in the Flock-It kit to do like 20 gloveboxes. I also got the carbs and linkage mocked up. There might be a few changes I make after it's in the car, but you get the idea. Ideally there should be and throttle arm going to each carb but since the TPS is mounted on one side that is not really possible, unless I move the whole assembly over with a longer rod. Are those carbs vintage or new? All in the details baby!     A new love has entered my life. It's not cheating on the '02 since we are in an open relationship and she allows for other BMW's to be a part of my life. I was sick and tired of my daily driver not being a BMW (and a doodoo car) so I've been on the lookout for something better. I picked up this little guy from AZ, actually PO drove it to Cali for me so I knew the motor was decent. She's got a few scars but just right fro me, AC blows cold, similar gas mileage as my old car, it's an investment, and it's something I actually know how to and can work on myself. This is what she looked like when I picked her up, she's been taking up some of my time lately, so she actually looks a bit different now. 1991 325is.     And finally as promised...the build sheet. Things may change but mostly this is it. I'm always on the lookout for the next cool thing. PM me or comment with any questions/ideas you have on my build, I like to talk shop.  Monster 2002 Build Sheet.xlsx   Next on the list: -Welding in the cage -Removing tar insulation -Grinding down all the holes welded up -Mounting the gas pedal (IE billet)
 

Let the fun begin

I liberated the right outer wheel housing from this car last year to help save the '68 that was T-Boned. After looking at all 3 outer wheel housings this spring I decided I had enough metal that I could make two parts...   This is really where I decided to commit to saving this '73. I have no intention of building a trailer queen from this pile. It's going to be a safe/sound driver that I'm not going to be paranoid about. As a college school student I made some doodles of my 1600 with a turbo aero kit and stripes. I've always wanted a turbo kit'd '02. That desire for flares and an airdam lead me to realize that I I don't need the arches... If I don't need the arches then I don't really need many repair panels beyond what I've saved from the '69. If I have an airdam I don't need a pretty nose or a front bumper for that matter... If I don't need a pretty nose I can clean up one of the others and still harvest this clean replacement for the '68.   In the past week I've managed to patch the right inner rocker panel, repair the bottom of the right A- pillar and repair/install the right rocker panel. The front half of the rocker is original to this car. The back half came from the '68 (which is getting a new OEM rocker). After I finish welding in the rocker later this week I'll start on the floor and frame rail repairs on the right side of this car. Both sides are utter garbage but I've still got the floor pans from the '69 so I'm got the majority of the metal needed to fix the soft spots on this one. I'll hand fab the rest from sheet steel as needed.       A box showed up on Saturday steeling my resolve to see this car to completion.

VWJake

VWJake

seperation of builds

I originally bought 2 cars- a '68 and a '69 in a package deal in 2016. Within a year this '73 popped up on CL as a parts car. It had been stripped of most anything small/easily removed and left for dead after a stalled restoration some 15+ yrs ago.         When I bought this car my initial intention was to harvest a quarter panel, wheel housing, nose, hood, and any other useful sheet metal for patches to repair my '68 and '69s. After I got the car home and cleaned it out I was able to confirm that this car was curiously sound in some strange places- The wheel housings, rear subframe mounts, and the rear rocker areas. The quarters and wheel arches are all nice as well. Everything else is a flaming tire fire body wise. I spent an hour or so getting the car running to realize that the engine seems to run quite well with no smoke or odd noises. I honed the brake master, clutch slave and master, and both brake cailpers, replaced the soft lines, capped off the rotten rear brake line and bled the system. Once I swapped out the rotten pedal box I was rewarded with functional brakes and a good clutch. The car now ran and "drove" ( in the most basic of senses- I didn't have to push it anymore). I drove the car into a shelter in the backyard where it is still resting today. Last fall I removed the right quarter panel with plans to use it on my '68. This spring the '69 turned into a pile of parts with the help of a body saw and a sawsall. Despite all of the rust I think this car is worth giving a second chance. I mean really... It runs, moves, and stops... How hard could the rest be? lol

VWJake

VWJake

'73 metal work and more boxes showing up

I welded the repaired right outer wheel housing back on the '73 a week or so ago. I was using weld through primer and had a horrible experience with the stuff. When coating both parts and trying to plug weld the welds popped and splattered as if I was welding a pile of rust in a puddle of oil. I tried letting it dry more thoroughly, and finally settled on using a flat faced drill bit to scrape away the primer within the weld hole. The welds were tolerable, but not what I wanted to see. Going forward I won't be using any more of that, I'll treat the seams after the fact with a "creeping" sealer of some sort. Anyway, after getting the outer wheelhouse and the C pillar bracing back on the '73 I rehung and tacked on the quarter panel. It's only tacked at the B and C pillars for now as I still have an outer rocker panel to replace and a trunk floor to repair.   Once the quarter was fitted and clamped down I decided to remove the remaining rocker panel from the right side of the car. The inner rocker was rotten at the leading edge and the bottom of the A-pillar was in pretty sorry shape as well. After I cut away the lower A-pillar I found a solid inner rocker minus the first 8" or so. I cut the inner rocker back to good clean margins and took it to the garage to use as template. Some 16ga steel sheet, a bit of work on the bead roller, some hammering (folded edge at the front), and trimmed to fit and I was ready to weld it in.         More 16ga sheet stock, hammers, dollies, cut-off wheels, and a welder got me a fresh lower A-pillar. It was tricky recreating the pad the backs up the jack point on the outer rocker skin. Originally I thought I would just hammer it in... That wasn't working at all so I made to two slices in the sheet so I could make an offset section. Once the depth of the offset was good I added filler pieces and welded it all back together. I didn't figure the size of my patch panel properly when I laid it out so I had to go back and add a little piece in the upper front corner. No harm though. It's all welded in a good to go. Plug welds and folded edges mimic the original. I left the lower edge loose until I was ready to re install the rocker panel as I wanted to make sure the new A pillar contour matched the old rocker.       With the lower A pillar repairs completed I refit the front portion of the right outer rocker. There was a small section after the jack pad that was pretty severely rusted from the inside so I cut that out and patched it with some 16ga sheet. After the upper and lower lips were straightened and the flanges were scuffed I aligned and plug welded the outer rocker back to the car. With that section fully welded I realized that I needed to remove the quarter panel again to install the replacement section of the outer rocker (harvested from the '68). So off with the quarter again. It only took a few minutes as there were just a few tack welds and a hand full of vise grips holding it on. I didn't quite get the rear portion of the rocker fully burned in before quiting time today.         A couple of boxes showed up yesterday. One from W&N and the other from Ireland Engineering. The former included 2 new outer rockers (left for the '73 and right for the '68), a right outer wheel arch for the '68, a lower trailing edge quarter repair panel for the '73, and some small odds n ends (door handle gaskets, etc.). The later included 4 ABS Turbo flares and a fiberglass turbo air dam for the '73. I've wanted a turbo-look '02 since I was a young lad. The '73 seem like the right car to fulfill that desire with.   I spent some time in the garage yesterday taking all 6 tail lenses (4 red centers and 2 ambers) apart (prying out the reflectors/inlays) to create the 4 best lens that I could. I managed to create 2 nice Red center lenses and 1 nice Amber and 1 decent Amber. With all of the inlays out I could clean everything really well and them mix n match parts as needed to make the best assemblies that I could. Someone previously tried to repair one of the amber lens with super glue after a hot bulb ruined the marker light portion of the lens. After getting the replacement red reflector portion out I could see that they didn't put in the clear prism segment (probably because of the bulging lens). I carefully ground down and polished (the best that I could) the remaining material. The glue deposits a white film or coating sometimes. It typically develops on finger prints and other smudges/smears. This lens looked terrible. With the inlays out I was able to polish away the deposits to make it generally presentable. I still want to polish the outsides of the lenses with a buffing wheel to really make them shine but for now I'm pleased with my progress. Once the outsides are polished and the lenses are washed one last time I will use dabs of clear silicone to secure the inlays. I also glass bead blasted a pair of lamp housings and painted them white on the inside and aluminum on the outside. The aluminum is too "bright" in my opinion. When I refinish the 2nd set I'll likely just clear coat the outside. The white is an old hotrodders trick to brighten up tail lamps. Looking forward to seeing the fruits of my labor when the time comes.                    

VWJake

VWJake