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Storing crankshafts vertical - old wives' tale


larry_in_socal

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I'm downsizing and organizing my garage stuff and I'm planning on putting my engine parts in one large plastic tote. If I recall when I last visited my local machine shop, I noticed all of the crankshafts up right and vertical, is this some old wives' tale that storing a crankshaft horizontal could end up "warping"it ? Right now I currently have my crankshaft wrapped in plastic, sprayed  with WD40, and in a box in the vertical position. Thoughts ?

 

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WD40 is a bad idea for storage.
Really do not use WD40 to conserve blank metal as WD40 has acidic content to break rust.
If you haven't got anything special use normal motor oil, or better something specialised - like branorost VCI paper, or if you're looking for something to spray on here in germany there's hölterol,  or use gun oil, even cavity wax, or grease - all is better than WD40

just no WD40 

Edited by uai
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Fluid film, here- 

it works pretty good so far.  Caveat- wipe it on after spraying-

it sprays pretty coarse, and unless you drench the object, it leaves dry spots

that it may or may not creep over to cover.

 

As to bending a crank by storing it on its side-  someone made that up.

 

t

 

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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There may have been a bit of truth back when cars were running cast cranks in straight 6 and 8 engines but metallurgy has come a long way from back then.

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If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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All,

 

thanks for the insight..

 

I didn't know that WD40 was acidic.

 

I'll work on cleaning it up and using grease instead.  Man, i appreciate you guys, I'm always learning something new.

 

My goal is to neatly put all my engine parts in plastic totes, I have plans to rebuild, but for now into the totes...

 

thanks,

 

Larry

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17 hours ago, tzei said:

i use grease - lots of it.

+1 on grease:  i use wheel bearing grease, slathered on each journal, the nose and the flywheel flange with a scrap piece of cloth wrapped around each.  The a light coat of grease on the other surfaces, and a heavy weight clear plastic bag to keep things clean.

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
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'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Cranks don’t bend so why not?

+ takes less space which is a problem in that location.

Engines stays in perfect steady temp & humidy = turn key, off you go. Oh and front blinkers are harder to steal.

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  • Haha 1

2002 -73 M2, 2002 -71 forced induction. bnr32 -91

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9 hours ago, tzei said:

Cranks don’t bend so why not?

 

I know (presume) you’re talking about cranks not bending in storage….

 

But - under some non-storage circumstances - our M10 cranks do bend.

(I’ve measured not a few with runout beyond spec). -KB

Edited by kbmb02
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Yes it’s not uncommon thing with ICE’s and i think this is where this tale originates. Was the used crank measured before it was stored? I bet not. Measured upon install and runout detected - ”damn these are plasticine”.

 

I not an expert but i think cranks don’t have that many dislocated atoms that could move that much in normal storage temps.

2002 -73 M2, 2002 -71 forced induction. bnr32 -91

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6 hours ago, tzei said:

I not an expert but i think cranks don’t have that many dislocated atoms that could move that much in normal storage temps.

 

My original post wasn't clear ... intended meaning was they cranks bend in non-storage events. -KB

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