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TobyB

Kugelfischer
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  1. My experience has been different- many years ago, they WERE western- European- made parts. And they held up just fine. More recently- 2010?- things started coming through 'Made in Turkey' and other hotbeds of automotive development. Then, some time after that, Fabrique au Chine. It was on a part- by- part basis, too- E36 parts DID seem to go first, then others, now... well, I haven't tried in the last few years- no, wait, I did- the "Heavy Duty" rear E36/46 shock mounts on 2 cars are now clunking away like mad after 18 months. yeah. t
  2. That's a BMW 2002. This is a Grenada. You made the right choice. t
  3. ugh. can't. unsee. toe it in a little. Much easier, unless you have like +2 on 1 side and -2 on the other. then there are other problems that should be fixed first. t
  4. Unless it's a rock crusher. Then it's character. Like a gear drive cam. t
  5. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Search?query=adjustable spring spacer&facet=GA_Nav_Part:Coil Spring Spacers 5" stock car springs work in back. I would start low- #250/in in front, #200/in in back. But ask your front strut supplier about damping- 'race' damping usually means stiff, which means higher spring rates. You will have a hard time finding soft, short rear springs. I had some luck cutting 12" 100#/in in half, and using the adjustable spacers. The m20 conversion weighs so close to a stock 2002 that the only real factor is the extra torque, and what you need to do to handle that. t
  6. I'd reuse those. Clean and re- grease the bearings. And yes, I too would try Moog- in other applications, good parts come out of those boxes. Much better than most aftermarket parts. It won't help your center link- engine mounts and trans mount are it. Likely, the rear mount is too low- the 245 has to be nearly touching the top of the tunnel back there... t
  7. Oh- that. Not a BMW valve, eh? What does your engine builder say? t
  8. Sadly, yes. What seems to be the rear 'cover' is really the main assembly plate, and the 'case' is really a front cover. It's unusual for them to leak at that seam- far more usual are seals. I suppose you could 'crack' it, get the old seal out, then use gasket maker. But that would change the spacing of the countershaft and the mainshaft bearings. Maybe not enough to matter... t
  9. Holy Mangelwurtzel- did the adjuster come loose? Lose a lash cap? Soft/broken valve spring? Time for some abrasive wheel cutting and ducking! Looks like a Furd to me- never seen a 2002 do that. t
  10. Am interested to see deleted picture of damage. From comments, it sounds like the valve stem sustained damage, something I've never run across with BMW valves... t
  11. It can also be a slightly sticky caliper- it can be either side, as just a little bit of drag will warm the pads, and make them bite better. A little more drag will overheat the pads, and they'll have LESS initial bite. Tires is a really good suggestion, too, as are failed bushings- often, you can't see it, but one side will be broken internally, and allow more movement than the other side. t
  12. I too coat paper gaskets that touch water. Maybe they don't need it, but I've seen quite a few leak, and they make a rusty mess of the studs/bolts when they do. I use permatex High- Tack it soaks into the paper... https://www.permatex.com/products/gasketing/gasket-sealants/permatex-high-tack-gasket-sealant/ t
  13. fuddy- duddy indeedy! But hey, my projects aren't particularly purist, either... Technically speaking, I'd recommend resetting rear camber to something like -2 degrees at your chosen driving ride height- otherwise, you'll get rear grip loss that might cause you some trouble in hard cornering or fast transitions. Also, do you have a big spreader under the rear shock mount? That's an oddly thin little cap, and it needs the load spread out as close to the edges as you can get it without making any sharp points that'll punch through. I finally just removed it when I mounted coilovers back there. Finally, do you have pics of the front struts? The inserts you show look like E46 style, and I'm curious as to how you attached them to a 2002 spindle. I DO like air suspension used in moderation- I have personally used it as an assist system for years in 3 or 4 vehicles. It's like a really nice progressive spring that you can adjust both in height and in rate. I would love an original Xb, bagged. t
  14. Aha. Yah. Your best bet is to fit all the parts, including trim, loosely, and then do a 'best fit' approximation. At this point, you may find you're moving the 'floating' parts quite a bit, and maybe even doing significant bodywork to get the panel seams to look right. In theory, you align the door to the rear quarterpanel, make sure the glass and wing window will work, then get the fender aligned to THAT, and conform the nose as a last step. The hood should cover a multitude of sins. In practice, you try that, discover that something won't work, modify, bend, spindle, grind, fold, and try again. And then spacer the door out, readjust the windows, throw away the Uro weatherstrip, try again, dig the Uro weatherstrip out of the trash and cut it down some, modify, unspindle, counterbend and refold. Eventually one side gets just about perfect, and then you go to work on the other, and suddenly discover that the first side could be better. And that you've taken out a panel 'feature' that was supposed to be there, like that little 'cheek' above the rear wheelarch. The first one's by far the hardest, because you haven't realized that these things were stamped out +- 2mm or so, and +2mm here doesn't mate well with -2mm there. So, no, the template is really the shell and things you can't move reasonably, and the variables are the things that you can. no help here. t


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