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Pre-paint parts considerations?


joebarthlow

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I wasn't planning to paint my '74 anytime soon, but since I'm replacing my front clip next month, I'll need to prepare to paint it in the next 8-12 months. I'm thinking glass out, maybe engine out. I have some trim/bumper holes to fill. I installed the interior, so I can remove it. my body trim is complete, attached, but I'll need to remove it. previous owner replaced the floors and spare carrier in the trunk. I coated the underneath and the suspension was rebuilt a couple years ago. engine, cooling, fuel, electrical are all good condition or restored. I'm in the process of a bumper swap (from '69 to '73). Body is overall decent shape and plan to sand it all down and spray, likely a color change. Originally Sienabraun, now Polaris, which I like, but I'm also thinking single stage Verona, Malaga or Chamonix. I plan to do much of the work myself and hire out for the critical stuff. This car is a driver and not a show car, but I like it looking original and correct-ish for the period. no intentions of selling it.

 

I'm starting a list of parts I'll need, or need to replace:

• windshield/rear window rubber, channel lock piece

• dash

• headliner

• hood/trunk roundels

• door rubber

 

What other parts should start looking for? any trim parts not reusable?

 

 

 

_JJS087601.jpg

Edited by joebarthlow

1974 BMW 2002 (Polaris > Sienabraun)

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Keep it simple, and save some cash, Replace nose panel and blend the paint. You would be able to leave your glass and weather strips alone. If you want second color change.....The correct way would be strip the paint/glass/weather strips before priming painting. Then there is the Maaco/Earl Sheib way whichever.

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it is a slippery slope, since once the body looks good with new nice paint, everything else that is not as nice and new looks like poop. yes, glass out, and then take it to a windshield shop to install, unless you think you can do it. Use straight knee and waist trim, bumpers, best taillights you can find, as well as side markers and turn signals. 

 

check know rust areas, inside bottom of doors, rear inside edges of rear wheels, around the turn signals, etc. Not fun to have rust bubbles later, good luck. 

20150526_130853.jpg

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If your windshield and backlight gaskets are in good condition, a  trick I learned from my auto body class instructor can save you having to remove/replace the glass.  You may have to remove the plastic chrome trim, but I'll bet yours is all dark and brittle anyway.  

 

Whatcha do is to gently pry up the edge of the gasket's lip where it contacts the body, and poke the beginning of a length of clothesline (use the vinyl-coated stuff, it's easier to work with) under the rubber so the lip is now 3-4mm above the body metal.  Do that all the way around, and then mask the rubber, wrapping the tape under the exposed lower edge.  

 

Once the car's painted and the paint is all hardened, remove the masking tape and pull the clothesline out.  The rubber gasket will snap back into position, the part line will be under the rubber, and there won't be any overspray--or part line--on the rubber.  

 

mike

 

PS--aluminum foil is great for masking off irregularly shaped objects when painting.  I used cardboard and tinfoil to mask off everything around the power brake booster on my '69, and painted it in place--without getting overspray on anything around it...

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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...and I'll just say this here, once, and be gone:

 

use a base/ clear system unless you're the one applying the material. 

At this point in the universe, the only reason to stay single

stage is if you're learning how to paint. 

 

I know that there 

are many out there that swear that it's single stage or nothing,

but my actual experiences, both with professional painters

and in learning to paint myself (I went with purple- it goes nicely with my eyes)

are that base/clear is a far superior paint system for a car that's going to get

driven.  Maybe even (gasp) exposed to sun.

 

t

 

 

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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On 1/13/2023 at 1:16 PM, TobyB said:

use a base/ clear system unless you're the one applying the material. 

You'll be far better off having your painter use the system he knows. I for one vote to pull the engine and clean out the trunk and get it all shot in the same color.

Edited by Son of Marty
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If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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1 hour ago, TobyB said:

...and I'll just say this here, once, and be gone:

 

use a base/ clear system unless you're the one applying the material. 

At this point in the universe, the only reason to stay single

stage is if you're learning how to paint. 

 

I know that there 

are many out there that swear that it's single stage or nothing,

but my actual experiences, both with professional painters

and in learning to paint myself (I went with purple- it goes nicely with my eyes)

are that base/clear is a far superior paint system for a car that's going to get

driven.  Maybe even (gasp) exposed to sun.

 

t

 

I use both so it's not "single stage or nothing" but I do consider the vehicle and paint color.  I've used single stage on my white Chevy work truck, okay, that one doesn't count, a Golf 2002tii, a Sahara 2002 and a Chamonix E3.  The Golf tii is the only color that I was on the fence with, but Sahara and Chamonix look really good single stage.  There's a really good chance that he'll drive his car more than I drive mine, so there's also that.

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Base/clear is superior to single stage in every aspect in my opinion.  The only drawback is the cost of materials will be higher.  Base/clear is more durable, more fade resistant (especially for colors that fade, like reds), the shine has depth, and if you should need to repair a portion of the paint later, it's far easier to blend base/clear.  Single stage tends to have a halo effect if you try to blend it and you can see the edge between the new and old paint.  Base/clear is really easy to fix.  Just blend as much basecoat color on the panel as needed and clear the whole panel and it turns out really well.  Just my 2 cents.    

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dropped the car off at Brosseau Coachworks in Estacada, Oregon to swap out my frontends. For now, I'm going to paint the front Polaris to match rest of the car. I'll then Install my newly restored '73 bumper set. Hopefully ready for Springtime driving!

1974 BMW 2002 (Polaris > Sienabraun)

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9 hours ago, joebarthlow said:

Dropped the car off at Brosseau Coachworks in Estacada, Oregon t

Why them? Good rep? Better estimate? Wondering why not one of the 2 Resto shops here in Eugene

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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On 1/28/2023 at 9:41 AM, tech71 said:

Why them? Good rep? Better estimate? Wondering why not one of the 2 Resto shops here in Eugene

After contacting 6 shops in Eugene, I figured out there are two kinds of shops: those who just want insurance work and those who want full restoration. Shops to do specialty work and understand classics, especially 2002s, are either going out of business or are backlogged with projects for 6+ months. The body/paint shop referred to me by The Sports Car Shop (my shop) is backlogged 8-10 months, but after talking to the owner, he may not make it that long as he can't hire anyone. Vintage Underground is great, I am friends with the owner, Joe Potter, and several of his staff. they have restored a 2002, but their focus is really Italian and British and typically large, show quality projects. I just felt my 2002 and what I need done wasn't going to be enough for them.

 

Brosseau is a decent shop with BMW 2002 and Porsche experience. Referred to me by a friend who has done work for me in the past. Plus they are willing to do my front end without turning it into a full restoration project. 

Edited by joebarthlow
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1974 BMW 2002 (Polaris > Sienabraun)

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