Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

NGK BP6ES


Emyers

Recommended Posts

Public service announcement.  NGK has discontinued the BP6ES, replaced with the BPR6ES for those that care.  

There is still some remaining stock on the shelves, when gone.....

https://www.ngk.com/product.aspx?zpid=9405

 

Earl

  • Thanks 1
  • Confused 1
  • Sad 1

74 02Lux

15 M235i

72 Volvo 1800ES

People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Emyers said:

Public service announcement.  NGK has discontinued the BP6ES, replaced with the BPR6ES for those that care.  

There is still some remaining stock on the shelves, when gone.....

https://www.ngk.com/product.aspx?zpid=9405

 

Earl


Thanks.

 

Does that extra “R” indicate “resistor”?
 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

image.jpeg

 

Dammit, Earl...

 

I guess people now

gonna hoard NGK plugs, too???

 

Ed

 

Edited by zinz
  • Haha 3

'69 Granada... long, long ago  

'71 Manila..such a great car

'67 Granada 2000CS...way cool

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AustrianVespaGuy said:

How much resistance are we talking?

5 K ohms

which is the same amount as the stock rotor has.

 

Since resistance is cumulative, would it help to use a 1 K ohm rotor when using the resistor plugs?

 

I had been using the 1 K ohm rotor thinking less resistance would be better, as in hotter.  Then I read that the 5 K ohm rotor gives a spark with a longer duration and that's what came on our cars originally... so I put a 5K rotor back in.

 

I wonder what difference it makes if the 5K ohm resistance is at the rotor end or the plug end.

 

 

   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well,

8 hours ago, AustrianVespaGuy said:

So the $2002 question then, with a good coil, how 'bad' are the resistance plugs? How much resistance are we talking?

 

Or better yet, what's the best non-NGK offering once the supply runs out? (totally went on Amazon and ordered a few spare sets)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Jae P said:

Just purchased a 20 count lot for 30 bucks after reading this! 


Five spark plug changes (20/4) should take you well into the future. For me, who drives my ‘76 about 2,500 miles annually, and changes plugs at approximately 5,000-mile increments — not because it needs it, but just because it’s easy — I wouldn’t need to buy more plugs for at least 12 years.  I guess I could stash 20 plugs between my toilet paper and dried-bean reserves.... ?
 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

  • Haha 3

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Conserv said:


Five spark plug changes (20/4) should take you well into the future. For me, who drives my ‘76 about 2,500 miles annually, and changes plugs at approximately 5,000-mile increments — not because it needs it, but just because it’s easy — I wouldn’t need to buy more plugs for at least 12 years.  I guess I could stash 20 plugs between my toilet paper and dried-bean reserves.... ?
 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

Steve, 

 

My thoughts exactly! I change my plugs every 2-3 years only because I don’t drive no more than 2-3k a year. I figured 20 plugs for 30 bucks, sh*t why not. Something less to think about while isolated at home. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t

  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...