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so i was installing some new rubber fuel lines. and i bought the 5/16th ID fuel line. and taking a look at the older fuel lines. and they seem to be a much small diameter. i worry that the larger fuel line isnt letting my electric low pressure electric pump build the pressure it needs to push the fuel to my weber carburetor. my car runs with sometimes when i begin to give it throttle, it will bog down very harshly. i believe this to possibly be a not-so-well tuned carburetor. 

 

but would the different diamater fuel line make a difference? 

 

also, what is a good fuel pressure regulator for the money? right now i am not running a regulator. 

 

 

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No, the line ID doesn't matter, as long as it's not too small.   1/4" is too small for a track car, I found out.

 

I like the Mallory bypass regulator that Summit and others sell, but it's over $100 now (gulp)

 

hth

 

t

Edited by TobyB

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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whichever regulator you choose, Invest a few bucks in a pressure tester (often combined with vacuum tester) to confirm settings. Stock hose is 8mm, close enough to 5/16. Keep in mind the parts of the stock system are 6mm, so size may not be important.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thank you for that. Not a lot of pressure!

 

Now I'm going to make some of you mad...why the heck can't a person just put a Holley 2-bbl on one of these? I'm an old hot rodder and I quite like the old Holleys. They're so simple whereas the Weber is...not. Has anybody ever seen this done, and why would I not want to do so, other than restoration reasons?

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Thank you for that. Not a lot of pressure!

 

Now I'm going to make some of you mad...why the heck can't a person just put a Holley 2-bbl on one of these? I'm an old hot rodder and I quite like the old Holleys. They're so simple whereas the Weber is...not. Has anybody ever seen this done, and why would I not want to do so, other than restoration reasons?

Pick a carburetor - then try to get it to work.  Please stick with one of the common replacements (like the 32/36 Weber).

BeckCarburetorad.jpg

Zenith32NDIX.jpg

 

Please don't tell us that you have a Holley "Bug Spray" 300 CFM carb that you want to slap on your 2002  :D .

Jim Gerock

 

Riviera 69 2002 built 5/30/69 "Oscar"

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One of those 'Holley' 2bbls is actually a licensed Weber design...

 

...and an OEM US carb is usually not particularly adjustable.  Which is why you can find

an adapter from most domestic carbs/engines to Webers...

 

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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