Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Welding 101


Recommended Posts

My first time welding was today. I have no experience prior to today aside from countless hours of YouTube videos. I have rusty rockers so I paid for a class and even brought my own materials. This was mig using flux.

 

I have one more class next week so if there are any pointers that are specific to 2002 sheet metal, I welcome them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1627.jpeg

  • Like 4

Series 1, 1969 2002

Instagram: joseiden_bmwerke

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welding hood with neck protection! At least some earmuffs - liquid metal in ear canal burns like mf.

I like TIG gloves for sheet metal work.

  • Like 2

2002 -73 M2, 2002 -71 forced induction. bnr32 -91

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is the model of your welder?
 

A good ground is key.  You can get one of these things below.  Don't drop them or they break. This will help you get the ground on the panel which give you better control.   Also you may want to punch holes in the rocker and plug weld them, in that case get a hole punch.  Vice grips will also help you hold things in place. 

 

Fit. trim, fit, trim about a hundred times

 

 

 

 

 

614eDjyGz3L._AC_SX679_.jpg.84353465b09177bd376e2d5a397f207b.jpg

WWW.AMAZON.CA

 

Hole Punch 

 

WWW.AMAZON.CA

 

7197Q37Uu4L._AC_SX679_.jpg.f586160ca61a927375639fcc56f203bd.jpg

  • Like 1

"Goosed" 1975 BMW 2002

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fill a 5 gal bucket and fill it with water and place a old bath towel in it, there will be fire at some point. also wear cotton  no synthetic cloth because you'll also set your self on fire at some point.

  • Like 2

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Use gauntlet gloves and a leather apron.  White hot sparks go right through synthetic material; a little slower through heavy cotton or wool, but they will burn through--then burn you.  Ask me how I learned this--sitting on a stool welding the rear wheel opening lips, wearing nylon socks...

 

mike

  • Like 1

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2002s are made out of a very high tensile steel- and damn, does that shit love to warp.

 

Don't be too proud to grind off a weld or 3 when it does, and retrim, and restitch.

It takes a LONG time to butt weld a seam without warping it, and then it's going to 

need to be sealed behind it, because getting 100% welds with a MIG is... an advanced art.

With a TIG, it's time consuming.  That wet towel?  Use it to cool the weld often, and then the dry towel

to get all the water out of it.

 

As you get better, you'll be tempted to draw longer beads- be careful.  I've warped hell out of things

because I was in a hurry, and I had it all dialled in very nicely, and the bead was flowing out perfectly....

and  boingy boingy, oil cans for days.  

 

Also, don't be afraid to weld a little, grind a little, anneal, and then do some metalwork to get things into shape.

Weld some more, grind some more, repeat.  Lots of water for cooling, acetylene for annealing, and

patience.

 

I had a friend long ago who could gas weld such that, in the time it took me to MIG it, he could gas it-

but his welds were continuous, and he did his bodywork after.  And there wasn't much of that.  He didn't

think he was all that good...

 

I like thin grinding wheels, and use both the angle grinder and the cutoff saw as a grinder- the cutoff saw is 

especially useful when things pucker from too much metal, and you just need to relieve a bit of the weld.

 

It's been a while, now, since I did much of that.

 

Oh- the thin gloves for MIG are really nice, these days.  Don't use the thin TIG gloves for MIG, though, as the 

spatter can get through them.  Also, keep your pant legs over your shoes, and don't wear sneakers with

nylon tongues.  Because when the whole mess blows through and lands on the tongue, you WILL dance...

 

t

 

  • Like 3

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, TobyB said:

It takes a LONG time to butt weld a seam without warping it, and then it's going to 

need to be sealed behind it, because getting 100% welds with a MIG is... an advanced art.

I butt welded a new lip around the rear wheel opening on my '02--a long, time consuming job.  As my welding instructor taught me, I tacked it in place with a weld every 3-4 inches, cooling after each weld with a wet towel.  Then I split the difference, alternating between the front portion and the rear.  Did that several times until the welds were only an inch or so apart, then filled in each one, again alternating from leading edge to trailing edge, meeting in the middle.  Always cooling after each weld.  Once I was finished, I put a bright shop light behind the weld, looking for pinholes, which I then welded with just a touch.  No warping!  Over four hours per side, but in 25 years, no rust or pop through.  And it didn't require much grinding due to the metal thickness, and the MIG turned down to a low setting.  Patience, Patience, Patience....

 

mike

  • Like 2

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Mike Self said:

As my welding instructor taught me, I tacked it in place with a weld every 3-4 inches, cooling after each weld with a wet towel.  Then I split the difference, alternating between the front portion and the rear. 

 

This is the same approach I'm going to experiment with next weekend. Cut a patch and tack weld in place. Then, rather than attempting to lay a bead as you might on heavier material, take the time and do many, many spot welds. Alternating edges and cooling between.

 

For the patch material use for the rockers themselves...I was planning on taking the good parts of a trashed rear deck lid to source my material. Any concern with that?

 

Appreciate all the safety notes as well. A wet cloth and bucket is a great idea.

I plan on taking many more hours of practice before attempting to work on my actual car.

Edited by Joesprocket
  • Like 1

Series 1, 1969 2002

Instagram: joseiden_bmwerke

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/30/2024 at 6:02 PM, tzei said:

Welding hood with neck protection! At least some earmuffs - liquid metal in ear canal burns like mf.

I like TIG gloves for sheet metal work.

that whole in your ear bit is a whole other level of brain rattle

'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Put emphasis on learning how to weld up holes.It is a skill that will pay dividends in the long run. Once you get comfortable welding up new steel get some scrap metal that is thin practice like crazy welding that. Once you can weld crappy but cleaned up steel you are well on your way.

'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 A tip of the hat to someone who teaches oneself to weld. 

 

I too entered this arena tabula rasa with my 2000c resto about 10 years back.   I went for years avoiding repairs because I could not be like Vulcan (the Greek/Roman god of fire, metalworking and the forge).

 

A few things learned along the way

  • welding fumes/castoff is very toxic, work in a well ventilated area, use fans, simple masks if possible
  • invest in lots of bright lighting you can employ as close to where you are going to lay your wire as possible
  • buy some some Eastwood welding magnets which work wonders in setting new panels in place in prep for your run with the torch      
  • cut out replacement panels with broad curves as much as possible and avoid hard angles where heat collects and warps your work
  • don't forget to turn your gas off at the end of your welding for the day  
  • button the top button on your shirt 
  • accept you will get warpage and even high end shops apply glazing putty  
  • learn the ancillary skill and art of shaping with body hammers and dolly   
  • make sure the battery is good if you have a welding helmet with adjustable light vision
  • ignore the occasional comment from the peanut gallery of comments if you post pics (for many have never swung a torch)

 

 

 

Edited by James Laray
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, James Laray said:

 A tip of the hat to someone who teaches oneself to weld. 

 

I too entered this arena tabula rasa with my 2000c resto about 10 years back.   I went for years avoiding repairs because I could not be like Vulcan (the Greek/Roman god of fire, metalworking and the forge).

 

A few things learned along the way

  • welding fumes/castoff is very toxic, work in a well ventilated area, use fans, simple masks if possible
  • invest in lots of bring lighting you can employ as close to where you are going to lay your wire as possible
  • buy some some Eastwood welding magnets which work wonders in setting new panels in place in prep for your run with the torch      
  • cut out replacement panels with broad curves as much as possible and avoid hard angels where heat collects and warps your work
  • don't forget to turn your gas off at the end of your welding for the day  
  • button the top button on your shirt 
  • accept you will get warpage and even high end shops apply glazing putty  
  • learn the ancillary skill and art of shaping with body hammers and dolly   
  • make sure the battery is good if you have a welding helmet with adjustable light vision
  • ignore the occasional comment from the peanut gallery of comments if you post pics (for many have never swung a torch)

 

 

 

 

Yup, that's a good point re: the fumes. I wear a 3m 7502 respirator with 2097 cartridges (I haven't ordered from that store before, but wanted to provide a link. caveat emptor). I still need to get better about putting fans around because I was welding and painting in a closed garage and I screwed myself up for a few days after. The 2097 cartridges are so good a cutting down on the noxiousness that you can't smell much of the bad stuff and you think you are ok. Fresh air in the working space is half the battle. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...