Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

New Member - 1972 BMW 2002


JJ Drive on

Recommended Posts

Hello, I have lerked on the forum for a while and finally picked up the car.   Luckily, free from my father in law with 99,000 miles and two owners.  All orignal from what I can tell other than some unusual repairs.

I finally made the decision to completely tear down the interior to check out the body, and ultimately replace all worn components. A full restoration does not make sense as it will be a daily driver in the summer.  My decision is not final and I am building my buget around the below plan, assuming help with the frame (if needed), engine, and of course a professional painter.

  • Remove all rust as possible
  • Seal the full body and frame, hoping for good luck on this part to avoid cutting and welding.
  • Paint color to be decided
  • Leave interior stock, but add sound insulation, new carpet, and maybe headliner.  Still trying to understand the additional guages and where to hid the ECM, maybe upgrade the radio.
  • EFI conversion
  • Upgrade all electrical and power for current and future additions
  • Upgrade suspension and brakes as needed, plus sway bars if needed
  • Five speed conversion for Highway driving
  • Add 292 cam and other comonents pending compression and air flow.  
  • Porting I am still learning and have a good contact for an engine guy

Ideally, added horse power under 150 is a benefit and still learning all of the ins and outs.  I have read a fair number of 318i conversions but I don't like the down draft.  The ITB's seem interesting, although a fair amount of mods seem to be required for TPS and MAP alterations for a Jenvey system or Dbilas.  Maybe I have not found the correct one yet.  So much to learn.  I wonder if a TI manifold can work with a single throttle body but have not researched.

I plan to log my adventure, as my mechanical and electrical knowledge is moderate at best.  It would be great to hear similar restortations, ideas, and suggestions. 

 

Photos to come soon with a few in my bio.

 

Thank you for your time.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, JJ Drive on said:

It would be great to hear similar restortations, ideas, and suggestions.

 

It all comes down to how ambitious you are and how deep are your pockets.  My 1970 BMW 1600 restoration started with a decent shell, but basically needed everything else, drive train, interior, trim, glass, etc.  I stripped it down and set it off to paint and body, got it back 18 months later (Covid).  During that 18 months, I prepared for its return, powder coating the subframes, rebuilding the suspension, researching options and ordering parts.  Like you, I wanted to upgrade ignition and fuel delivery, so all my research and planning was in preparation for that outcome.  I ran separate power distribution for all non-stock upgrades (fan, fuel pump, ECU, O2 Sensor, Injectors, Fast Idle Valve, Etc.).  I had 2 engine options (S14 and M10) and built both for EDIS-4 wasted spark ignition and and ITB's so I could swap them if needed.  When I got the shell back in late 2021, I started installing all of the components and parts.  My New Year's resolution is to have it running and driving in 2023.

 

Lots of good folks are on this site that will take the time to guide you through this process.  When you get your photos, start a Blog so we can follow your progress.

 

Welcome and good luck,

 

Mark92131

 

 

  • Like 2

1970 BMW 1600 (Nevada)

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, JJ Drive on said:

Hello, I have lerked on the forum for a while and finally picked up the car.   Luckily, free from my father in law with 99,000 miles and two owners.  All orignal from what I can tell other than some unusual repairs.

I finally made the decision to completely tear down the interior to check out the body, and ultimately replace all worn components. A full restoration does not make sense as it will be a daily driver in the summer.  My decision is not final and I am building my buget around the below plan, assuming help with the frame (if needed), engine, and of course a professional painter.

  • Remove all rust as possible
  • Seal the full body and frame, hoping for good luck on this part to avoid cutting and welding.
  • Paint color to be decided
  • Leave interior stock, but add sound insulation, new carpet, and maybe headliner.  Still trying to understand the additional guages and where to hid the ECM, maybe upgrade the radio.
  • EFI conversion
  • Upgrade all electrical and power for current and future additions
  • Upgrade suspension and brakes as needed, plus sway bars if needed
  • Five speed conversion for Highway driving
  • Add 292 cam and other comonents pending compression and air flow.  
  • Porting I am still learning and have a good contact for an engine guy

Ideally, added horse power under 150 is a benefit and still learning all of the ins and outs.  I have read a fair number of 318i conversions but I don't like the down draft.  The ITB's seem interesting, although a fair amount of mods seem to be required for TPS and MAP alterations for a Jenvey system or Dbilas.  Maybe I have not found the correct one yet.  So much to learn.  I wonder if a TI manifold can work with a single throttle body but have not researched.

I plan to log my adventure, as my mechanical and electrical knowledge is moderate at best.  It would be great to hear similar restortations, ideas, and suggestions. 

 

Photos to come soon with a few in my bio.

 

Thank you for your time.

wait - before we say congrats to this plan the old guys/ owners can become pretty attached to our stock machines.  Did you get permission from your father in-law?  

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pictures or it didn't happen!

 

Your plan sounds good, but it's a lot easier to plan than execute.

 

There's tons of great information here, the search function is your friend. Check out the articles section for the factory BMW repair manual and many other helpful articles.

 

Start slow with just getting the motor running, brakes, suspension and steering. Then you can worry about upgrading everything else.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you build your engine with a 292 cam and 9.5 pistons I wouldn't do porting, BMW did a great job there and at this level of build it's easy to go backwards, port matching the manifolds for sure and reliving the valve pocket a tad will do you fine, in MHO anyway.

  • Like 1

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome! I’m relatively new here too, having picked up my 72 2002tii a couple months ago. 
I agree with above-brakes first, then go-fast stuff (starting with suspension). Keep in mind the car is 50 years old so lots of the rubber parts, particularly bushings, need refreshing. 
This week I’ve been doing just that-bushings and brakes. 
if it’s a daily read up on dual carbs more. They’re high maintenance and may not be to your liking in the long run, for a daily. Although if it’s just summer might be ok. I’m in SoCal so will daily mine all year. 
looking forward to seeing your progress. 

  • Like 1

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A stock rotating assembly with a synced 32/36, fresh ignition, and a 3.91 rear make for a really fun car.  My butt dyno has a hard time justifying the money for dual 40's or efi after driving a properly tuned downdraft on a stock motor. Add a suspension refresh and some sticky tires and you're all but guaranteed to violently sling your groceries around in the trunk on your way home from the store. 

 

A set of E21 recaros make all the difference in the world if your budget allows.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for all of the comments and I attached the photos. Excuse my garage as I am still clearing out space.  Getting my third stall ready is an ongoing process which I hope to complete by the end of January.  New tools, tool box, storage cabinets, heater for the garage, etc. 

 

The car was running last June and my father in law tried again before I picked it up. He said it turns over but the choke is stuck.   

IMG_0149.jpg

IMG_0152.jpg

IMG_0151.jpg

IMG_0150.jpg

IMG_0148.jpg

IMG_0215.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, JJ Drive on said:

The car was running last June and my father in law tried again before I picked it up. He said it turns over but the choke is stuck

 

I would ditch the dryer vent hose for the correct part as MarcD points out.  Buy a rebuild kit for the 1 barrel Solex.  Replace that Blue Coil with one that isn't internally resisted (Black Coil) so it works with the Ballast resistor and drive that sweet original car until it really needs a restoration.

 

IMHO,

 

Mark92131

  • Like 3

1970 BMW 1600 (Nevada)

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice-looking survivor car. My two cents: The 18-24 months it'll take you to execute your plan are 18-24 months you'll be without a running driving 2002. In the meantime, you could be driving something that's had a little sprinkling of rolling restoration dust—a light sort-out, a fresh suspension, maybe a new Weber, and you can be the guy driving a 2002 and smiling like a Cheshire cat.

  • Like 4

The new book The Best Of The Hack Mechanic available at https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0998950742, inscribed copies of all books available at www.robsiegel.com

1972 tii (Louie), 1973 2002 (Hampton), 1975 ti tribute (Bertha), 1972 Bavaria, 1973 3.0CSi, 1979 Euro 635CSi, 1999 Z3, 1999 M Coupe, 2003 530i sport, 1974 Lotus Europa Twin Cam Special (I know, I know...)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...