Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

"21 USA" block casting?


MarcD

Recommended Posts

Taken from another thread:

On 10/24/2018 at 4:24 PM, Conserv said:

 

Some of the BMW-remanufactured engines had new identification stamped into the engine’s VIN boss. Some of the BMW-remanufactured engines had printed labels with the new identification pasted to the engine’s VIN boss. Some of the BMW-remanufactured engines had new identification stamped into the narrow shelf at the top rear of the block, just behind the head. Some new BMW bare (short) blocks came with blank engine VIN bosses — this is why I was asking for the dates. I’m confident there are other means that both BMW and aftermarket engine suppliers used, but I’m not familiar with them!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That appears to be the boss where the factory stamped the engine's number.  If you look carefully you'll note that the machined area is below the surrounding metal, indicating the original number has been machined off.  

 

That number shown doesn't jibe with any factory remanufactured engine numbers I've seen (or are noted here on the FAQ) so my guess is that someone in the US who rebuilt engines did this one, and it was their 21st product.  The stamp immediately preceding the 21 looks like a BMW roundel but I've never seen one stamped on an engine before...interesting mystery...

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That doesn't look familiar to me, either- but Steve might recognise it.

 

I HAVE seen the roundel stamped, but the rest of it looks too... sloppy... to be BMW.

Also, the characters are US looking.

 

fwiw, which isn't very much

t

 

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, TobyB said:

looks too... sloppy... to be BMW.

 

My thoughts also. I'm unaware of any domestic builders that stamped the boss with a roundel but since I started tinkering with these I've learned I am unaware of a lot of things.  

 

I guess it's time to start measuring parts to see what all was done. Would cam lift be a good indicator of stock sized pistons?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Mike Self said:

That appears to be the boss where the factory stamped the engine's number.  If you look carefully you'll note that the machined area is below the surrounding metal, indicating the original number has been machined off.  

 

That number shown doesn't jibe with any factory remanufactured engine numbers I've seen (or are noted here on the FAQ) so my guess is that someone in the US who rebuilt engines did this one, and it was their 21st product.  The stamp immediately preceding the 21 looks like a BMW roundel but I've never seen one stamped on an engine before...interesting mystery...

 

mike


Mike, notice the coolant outlet on the back of the head. That stamping is directly onto the block casting behind the cylinder head, not in the traditional spot on the machined surface by the starter. 
 

I can’t imagine that roundel stamp being applied by anyone besides BMW. Can’t help on the other numbers. 

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed: this was not The Stamper’s finest hour (he was later found sleeping in the janitor’s closet)… 

 

But this is certainly a factory remanufactured engine. This upper shelf at the aft end of the block, barely visible behind the head, was an oft-used location for the factory engine stamps. The first photo below shows a remanufactured factory turbo engine (“22 T” was the engine code for a turbo). Code “21 US” was an E21-head engine, intended for 1976 49-state versions, second photo below (part number 11009057924).

 

Rather than re-write what has been written previously, I’d recommend the following article to fully identify your engine and decode the remanufacturing stamp. I wouldn’t be shocked to find a month and year stamp — and maybe even a 4-digit serial number on that same shelf, to the right, just beyond the head’s port.

 

 

The third photo below shows a late, and very complete, factory stamping placed on the original engine number boss, also with the BMW roundel.

 

So, what is the casting date of the block, and what type of head does it have currently — and what is its casting date?

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

21940F8C-BFDE-441B-B8F9-F3FD0172518B.jpeg

F218067C-1EF5-477F-B882-53E310677C92.jpeg

088F784F-B675-456F-A0AA-06C001AA9AF4.jpeg

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I looked at my intake and block and it looks nothing like that, 71 carb.  what year the example, carbureted, fuel injected.  looks like cast iron head on a al block unless that pic is upside down.

Gale H.

71 2002 daily driver

70 2002 malaga (pc)

83 320i (pc)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, 71bmr02 said:

I looked at my intake and block and it looks nothing like that, 71 carb.  what year the example, carbureted, fuel injected.  looks like cast iron head on a al block unless that pic is upside down.

 

What you are seeing: the rear edge/corner of the cylinder head (intake side), the back of the block, and the front edge of the transmission 'bell housing'. -KB

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, kbmb02 said:

 

What you are seeing: the rear edge/corner of the cylinder head (intake side), the back of the block, and the front edge of the transmission 'bell housing'. -KB


+1

 

Red box around head. Blue box is transmission. The meat in the middle is the block.

 

1E9E3D1C-A696-416B-8D9F-F4C2E4B5C871.jpeg

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, MarcD said:

 

I guess it's time to start measuring parts to see what all was done. Would cam lift be a good indicator of stock sized pistons?

 


If (a.) it still has an E21 2,0 head — which is indicated by the “21 US” engine code — and (b.) there is no sign whatsoever  🙄 that the engine has been cracked open since the remanufacture, you should expect flat-top pistons (8.1:1), first or second oversize, and a stock camshaft — albeit the super-hot 😋 # 5 type, found only on 1976 49-state versions. Of course, it’s probably been 3 or 4 decades since this was remanufactured, so it’s hard to predict the current components. You can insert a scope in the spark plug openings to check for flat-top versus bathtub or piano-top pistons.

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow--Steve, thanks for the detailed information.  I never knew the factory stamped anything on a reman block other than a new coding number where the old motor number was stamped.  And while I've seen a couple of reman blocks, I never noticed that stamp.  Interestingly this stamping was on a machined pad, while the picture you posted showed it stamped directly on the rough casting.  

 

After 53 1/2 years of owning/working on 2002s I learn something new from the FAQ almost every day.

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ok thats the water outlet at the back of the cylinder head. finally got oriented correctly.   just double checked mine again no stampings on that flat. bmw logo looks good to me, agree with others this is a factory rebuild although there should be some kind of stamping on the flat above the starter boss to confirm factory rebuild.  strange indeed.

Gale H.

71 2002 daily driver

70 2002 malaga (pc)

83 320i (pc)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Mike Self said:

Wow--Steve, thanks for the detailed information.  I never knew the factory stamped anything on a reman block other than a new coding number where the old motor number was stamped.  And while I've seen a couple of reman blocks, I never noticed that stamp.  Interestingly this stamping was on a machined pad, while the picture you posted showed it stamped directly on the rough casting.  

 

After 53 1/2 years of owning/working on 2002s I learn something new from the FAQ almost every day.

 

mike


Me, too, Mike. That’s why this forum is so amazing!

 

The remanufactured markings varied over time, with BMW’s single-digit year code making it, today, impossible to definitively distinguish in which decade the remanufacturing occurred. So how do distinguish engines remanufactured early, middle, or late in 30-year process! 😡 Casting dates on blocks and heads can sometimes eliminate earlier dates. I’m guessing BMW assumed, early on, that they’d only be remanufacturing ‘02 M10’s for a decade, and provided a single-digit year code. So we can’t tell a November 1977 remanufacture (e.g., “11  1”) from a November 1987 remanufacture (also, “11  1”), from what might even be a November 1997 remanufacture — the program appears to have ended in the 1990’s.


Near the end of the program — well, maybe it was near the end —  they even tried applied labels. The photo below shows a “22TI US” engine remanufactured in April 1993 (“04  3”), or perhaps April 1983….

 

(If you go back to the Engine Identification article, linked above, which reproduces one of the factory documents, or even the single page of that document I reproduced a few posts back, you’ll see the application for the “22TI US” is a U.S.-spec E12-head tii — so a 9.0:1 compression ratio — along with its part number, 11009056520).

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

 

 

 

086F04DC-0AF1-4D5C-966B-6FFE16B86D7C.jpeg

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the 80's the EPA got on BMW and other brands case about selling non approved parts to a smog equipped car, for example for a number of years factory rebuilt engines were priced very competitively with a good rebuild and most knowing owners would buy the 9.5 to 1 euro tii block thus angering the almighty smog gods. Anyhoo this might be what BMW did to assure the right block was used before they went to the more comprehensive stickers.

  • Like 1

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...