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mosman58

Best Alarm for 2002

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Around these parts it seems to be a manual transmission.

People see that stick and just walk away. Nothing in my car worth stealing anyway. Heck the doors don't even lock.

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Guest gliding_serpent
Around these parts it seems to be a manual transmission.

So true. Less than 10% of north american cars sold are manuals these days. Sad that even the Porsche latest Porsche GT3's are are rumored to be coming with flappy paddles.

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Rattle snake on the dash?

Quick release steering wheel?

Hydraulic brake lock?

Secret engine immobiliser?

Proximity alarm linked to I phone.

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Guest Anonymous

Yep I agree....

I've taken a lot of stolen vehicle reports...my unofficialmental stat is the vast majority of vehicles that are stolen are automatic..I equate that unofficial stat to the fact the vast majority of car thieves are youngsters and the vast majority of youngsters don't know how to drive a stick...

Anyway with all of the reports I've taken 3 cars had their club defeated...so the club or other device is a good layer of protection....I also agree as a deterrent simply disconnecting ur coil or dizzy or anything in engine compartment is a great layer of protection....

The vast majority of thrives rape ur ignition so to say by putting something hard in it and forcing it........anything that creates time consumption is not a good Target...loud alarms bother ur neighbours enough to call the police so they really do work...

ira

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Guest Anonymous

The good thing is I have never taken a stolen vehicle report from a 2002 owner....and most likely a 2002 won't be stolen by a youngster....however if a 2002 is stolen it will most probably be stolen by a pro......but our community is so intimate that the vehicle will at some point be discovered.....this unofficial....

ira

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1. A hidden switch that interrupts current flow to the coil (i.e. in series with the wire that runs from the ign switch to the coil). To gild the lilly, put in a second switch in the start circuit so the starter won't even work. Lotsa places to hide a switch under the dash--or even put it in plain sight with several other switches...most car thieves aren't the smartest folks, and will abandon the attempt pretty quickly if the engine won't turn over.

2. A friend designed a simple circuit that causes an LED to flash every few seconds. I mounted the circuit in a small plastic box labeled "Compugard" and placed it prominently on the dashboard, wired to the car's electric system. Looked just like an alarm box--one that was unfamiliar (and therefore intimidating) to the average car thief.

mike

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Several years ago I went with an aftermarket Alpine security system set-up in mine. It's worked well, I like it.

For my installation I got the flasher (mounted into the top of my Seat Belt Warning block on the dash), a multi-function remote, and I equipped the car with conductivity, audio, and motion-sensors. The alarm horn is mounted in my engine bay, under the brake booster. The motion sensors are mounted in the center of the car, under the shift surround, and I adjusted 'em to detect motion around my side windows. It works pretty cool, even with the windows down - and it helps dissuade folks leaning into my car at meets and such. ;-)

An alarm won't deter a pro or a determined thief - but it works well enough in most situations, and gives me a little peace of mind.

Tom

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When I bought my tii 21 years ago the previous owner had a toggle switch installed just in front of the hood release. Flip the toggle and the fuel pump in the tank is killed. The engine still tries to turn over, but doesn't start because it has no fuel. I figure a couple of minutes of that and the thief will give up. I only use it when parking in a dodgy area or parking long term when traveling.

Around town I leave it unlocked with the windows open. If someone is going to steal your car, they are going to steal your car. I don't want them breaking it or messing it up in the attempt.

My '66 Citroen has a starter button (unmarked), a choke, and a 4 speed on the tree... so I figure no one really knows how to start it or move it... lol.

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When I bought my tii 21 years ago the previous owner had a toggle switch installed just in front of the hood release. Flip the toggle and the fuel pump in the tank is killed. The engine still tries to turn over, but doesn't start because it has no fuel. I figure a couple of minutes of that and the thief will give up. I only use it when parking in a dodgy area or parking long term when traveling.

Around town I leave it unlocked with the windows open. If someone is going to steal your car, they are going to steal your car. I don't want them breaking it or messing it up in the attempt.

My '66 Citroen has a starter button (unmarked), a choke, and a 4 speed on the tree... so I figure no one really knows how to start it or move it... lol.

... Unless if they have driven one before ;)

Seriously though, driving a DS for the first time was INTERESTING. One of the reasons I love my job... Once I got used to it and learned how to push the button without locking the brakes at high speeds, I absolutely fell in love with old Citroens. What a fantastic, comfortable ride.

I heard a good story a while back from a Model T owner who said he came out to his car one day to find someone trying to steal it. Long story short, he watched the guy fiddle with it for a few minutes before telling him "If you can start it, you can steal it". The guy scurried off quickly.

If you think a stick shift is good theft prevention, try a stick shift with the throttle in the middle, a shift lever that would be more at home in a tractor than a car, a hand clutch, and you can't forget the manual timing advance!

I agree with leaving the car unlocked to prevent break in (just keep valuables out of it). Hidden kill switch is a great way to delay things for sure. My girlfriends father has a beautiful Oldsmobile Delta 88 that has had the roof cut open on two occasions; the second time it was unlocked. If only thieves were smart enough to check the door before doing damage! heh.

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Trunk monkey.

trunkMonkey.jpg

This wont work. This is the Chaperone version not the anti-theft version.

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