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Early Lower Timing Cover Pointer Hack Needed


Go to solution Solved by Mike Self,

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I'm rebuilding an early 1969 M10 and the timing cover that came with it is lacking the pointer (see below).  Has anyone come up with a hack to add a pointer.  I notice the back of the cover has somewhat of a bung, but I'm reluctant to drill through it to add a pointer.  Any thoughts on a solution?

6E349BF7-B7F3-41A8-A175-76BBFB525EA0.jpeg

82136DE9-76DC-477A-997D-CF1B9F0E9AFB.jpeg

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Yep, must be some of those covers floating around.

I have at least two.

Just but one somewhere

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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I'm cheap and my cover has already been decked to match the block.  I haven't bought the new flywheel yet so that may be an option.  I new used cover is an option, but....$

 

Murph

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The problem is BMW over the years used several different locations for the timing pointer and you will need a matching pully or at least remark your pully when the engine is at TDC or as above just time it off the flywheel.

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Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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7 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

or as above just time it off the flywheel.

With a battery sittin there it’s not that easy to get a clean line of sight on that pin/ pulley anyway

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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Battery is in the trunk so that's not an issue, but I do agree getting a line of sight on my current engine that has the pointer is PITA.  I was planning to use the front pointer for when I degree the CAM in addition to my gauge.  Flywheel may be the best way to go or just rely on my wire I'm using to set TDC.

 

Thanks 

Murph

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I've always made a pointer that hangs off one of the unused mounting bosses and indicates TDC 

of whatever front crank pulley I'm using.  Or whatever degree marking that's the most useful.

 

I seem to remember a piece of aluminum angle can be cut to work, but this was all done before your

RFID tracker was also your camera, so I'll have to go take a picture of it tomorrow.

 

t

 

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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  • Solution

Per your first picture:  if the pointer goes into the blind hole at the 5 o'clock position relative to the crankshaft hole (and connected by a rib), I'll wager that's a 6mm hole.  It would be easy enough to tap the hole for a 6x1 mm thread, then take a bolt or machine screw of appropriate length, cut the head off and grind the end to a point (chuck it into an electric drill and go after it with a file).  Thread it into the hole with some locktite and your problem is solved.  

 

Threading is probably a better solution than trying to press a rod into the hole, as too much pressure might split your casting.

 

mike

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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