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65000,00 dollar mechanical rebuild


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Hi folks, This is something I think we should all be mindful of,A shop call me to check out a car that runs like crap, the customer spent 35000.00 on a motor,five speed, and limited slip, Radical cam, too much carburetor. It idles like crap, seems like a lot of us want to build a want to be race car , you can’t drive on the street, an it’s far from a race car, myself included, keep it close stock ,I think you be happier 

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Before stocking up on parts for a rebuild you need to make a honest assessment of the way you drive 70-80% of the time and build your powertrain to match that. 

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If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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Not sure I spent $35000 rebuilding my Alpina/Schnitzer motor.......but I might have (afraid to add up the invoices), of course that is parts and labor, I owned the core motor to start.  That is a really big number for something that isn't really special (like a Schnitzer or M12)

MVIMG_20200615_112611.jpg

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3 hours ago, Lowered and Louvered said:

Hi folks, This is something I think we should all be mindful of,A shop call me to check out a car that runs like crap, the customer spent 35000.00 on a motor,five speed, and limited slip, Radical cam, too much carburetor. It idles like crap, seems like a lot of us want to build a want to be race car , you can’t drive on the street, an it’s far from a race car, myself included, keep it close stock ,I think you be happier 

Name of shop (or location)?

 

Also would like to see pics of the car and details. 
 

Spec built cars can be six figures easy. Hobby/weekend cars, that’s up to the owner. 

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Why bother adding up receipts?  Just drive it and enjoy it.  The original matching #'s motor for my tii has been found. It was recently rebuilt to Euro spec (9.5:1 comp ratio) and will cost me a pretty penny but it's less than 5 figures for the long block. 

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74 tii (many mods)
91 318i M42

07 4Runner

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To each his own.

I wouldn't trade my mildly hotted up engine with EFI etc. for anything. Except an even more hotted up engine.

The one I have came as a project, and the PO had accumulated most of the hotrod bits, so I ran with the ball. It's wonderful.

On the other hand, I have wondered what a stock 02 feels like. It's been decades since I drove a stock one.

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To each their own.

 

Money's overrated, time's under- appreciated.

 

The car I race idles pretty well at 900, when I haven't blown it up.

 

t

thats-enough-internet-for-today-cats.gif

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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$35K for drive-train rebuild ?

 

I'm not surprised these days when a decent paint job costs $20K +.

 

An engine rebuild is straightforward. The mechanic relies on the machine shop for  machining. And, these days most mechanics opt for the machine shop to also perform the head assembly. Machine shop services are not that expensive, if you do all your own assembly, including the head. It's really not that big of a deal.

 

This is getting insane.

 

I remember paying $180 for a single stage Earl Scheib paint job in 1990. It actually lasted 10 years before fading. I did all my own prep work and disassembly / assembly. So it looked as presentable as the average paint these days, if not better. The color was a deep Red, close to the original Granada Red. I still remember the name "Matador Red" by Earl Scheib.

 

A gallon of good body filler sets you back about $150 in this post-pandemic world of hyperinflation. Toying with classic cars is a big luxury these days.

 

 

Edited by Alexei
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That’s silly money. But I guess you have to have silly money to be willing to spend it. I don’t. 


is it just not properly tuned? Having all the right parts is meaningless if ya haven’t spent the time to get them working in concert .

 

I spent maybe 4-5k building my motor, all-in. Maybe a few grand on-top for  rebuilding the subframe/steering/suspension assembly. Didn’t go over the top, but didn’t cut corners. Just did things intelligently and beyond machine-work, all myself… Labor is expensive, and was a fun learning experience. 5 years later it’s still running solid.

 

my recent nut/bolt rebuild of my complete rear-end cost less than a grand, all in with paint. And that’s with buying a spate rear subframe and trailing arms.

 

*pats self on back.

 

Make friends with your local machinist and painter… goes a long way.

Edited by 2002Scoob
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