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Rear subframe metal/rubber mount #9 UPDATE SOLVED!


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So there I was, tracing down a rear end thump. First thought perhaps the Bilstiens did not have the proper rubber top mount with insert. I know because that was a cause for similar noise in another car. However in this case, the previous owner did install the shocks correctly.   

 

Next was to check the subframe mounts (#9) in diagram.  While they show wear and their age, they are not completely shot.  I decided to reinstall them. Now the thing is I did this one side at a time by unbolting much of the connective parts. Even removed the control arm bushing bolts so as to alleviate the strain on the brake line and parking cable. That is a big issue when doing this job with the subframe still attached.  The biggest issue is having enough traveling distance for the subframe to drop and still have enough travel distance for the mount to clear the (#8) bolt.  

 

All said and done I came to the conclusion that to reinstall this mount (#9) and for any future work, why not just reverse the (#10) bolts?  In doing so the mount slides straight up onto the big bolt. No need to worry about dropping the subframe and the stresses put onto the lines and cable.  One thing to note is the bolts are longer so a thicker washer (or shorter bolt) will need to be employed.  

 

see pics.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

diag_fci.png

IMG_9956.JPG

IMG_9957.JPG

Edited by conkitchen
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But what do I know

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Well if you reverse them you'll need someone inside and out side the car to bolt or unbolt them and threading a nut onto the bolt from inside that tunnel they sit in would be challenging.

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If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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1 minute ago, Son of Marty said:

Well if you reverse them you'll need someone inside and out side the car to bolt or unbolt them and threading a nut onto the bolt from inside that tunnel they sit in would be challenging.

I think you think I meant reversing bolt #8 when I am saying to reverse bolt #10 no? 

But what do I know

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I have always installed them that way. Much better. Don't know what they've been thinking at design department that day. Maybe too many vodka tonics after lunch.

Edited by Tommy

Racing is Life - everything before and after is just waiting!

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7 minutes ago, conkitchen said:

More a Scotch man myself

As Arthur said in the 1981 movie showing his huge home bar "there are many bottles and colors but they all work the same".

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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The Graphics are just graphics. The Bolts are correct the way you did them. 
There are more "flaws" e.g. the subframe pictured has the holes for POS 9 mirrored but in real life they are arranged the same orientation on both ends.

Edited by uai
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Yeah, I always took the drawings 

(especially the part number diagrams)

as 'this goes here' not

'this is how it goes together'

 

t

ginnand tonix

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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Below is a pic from the shop manual.  I think it was meant to install with the bolts coming into the bushing from the rear with the nuts in front.  The fact that the bolts cannot be removed with the bushings in place is a safety design.  If you lose a nut, it doesn't result in catastrophic rear subframe collapse.  Just my thought.

 

 

 

subframe bushing.jpg

Edited by bergie33
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Karl B.

1974 2002tii Malaga ("Conrad") -->> Conrad's Restoration Blog

2003 330i ZHP 6-spd

2011 328i xDrive

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Isn't it one of those fail safe ideas - loose the nut and you won't loose the bolt, or completely separate the subframe from the car?

 

[bergie33 beat me to it]

Edited by NickVyse
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avaTour2.jpg.52fb4debc1ca18590681ac95bc6f527f.jpg

 

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