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Boot lock locked


Monty
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So, I ran across the old set of keys, in an old box.  I'm just setting the stage. They sat on the computer table for about a week without much thought. I knew the ignition key wouldn't work because, I changed that out already. So last night, I grabbed the keys without much thought to see if the other key would fit the boot lock. It did. It locked the boot. And it is still locked.

So take your best shot. I can take it. Why would a 50 year old lock work correctly. I've owned the car for 25+ years and don't ever remember ever locking the trunk. 

 

So, short of a locksmith and thoughts.

 

Your Idiot,

Chas.

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I've had that happen twice, due to the little tab at the end of the tumbler coming off.  I felt REALLY dumb the second time.  I need to drill that thing and add a little set screw to keep it from happening again.  I'm not locking it again until I do that.

image.thumb.jpeg.522e6adf088cbc3c5b56ebcb3f7d1754.jpeg    image.thumb.jpeg.3ce1c2d2757fc2f2fc5696efa6424c9d.jpeg

I searched the archives and found an old thread where someone knew a secret to getting into the trunk, but wouldn't share it in the thread because it works so well.  He didn't want any bad-guys making the special trunk picking tool and then stealing our stuff!  I'll follow his lead and share the secret via private messaging if you'll send me one.


Tom

 

P.S.  A lock smith would not be able to open it, if you have the same problem I had.

 

 

   

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No worries for now. I went out this morning and was able to get it opened. Don't know how, but it is open. I'm just going to order a new lock and put the old keys away.

But thanks for help.

 

This site is full of wisdom and helpful members.

 

Your Idiot,

Chas.

 

PS: I do try to search the archives, but my lack of knowledge with terminology is lacking.

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8 hours ago, Monty said:

PS: I do try to search the archives, but my lack of knowledge with terminology is lacking.


 

Just to clarify, I wasn't nagging.  I was bragging.   

I was sooooooooo happy to find that thread.

 

I'm not sure how long it would take me to find it again.  I do remember who had the answer though, so I could use the "+more search options" feature and type him into the "search by author" selection.  I think searching is fun.  So is answering questions though... so, fire away!

 

It didn't occur to me to use "boot" while searching.  :) 

 

Glad you got in!

 

 

 

 

   

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Didn't want you to think that I hadn't tried.

Still don't know how it unlocked. The car gods must have taken pity on me.

 

I'm going to look into the (+more search). See more info passed on.

 

Chas.

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10 minutes ago, Monty said:

Still don't know how it unlocked.

Worn keys sometimes won't properly engage the wafers/pins inside the lock, and it only takes one (of the 4-5) not engaging properly for the lock not to work.  Sometimes wiggling the key around in the lock will cause all the pins to align; sometimes not.  

 

The ignition switch on my '69 is worn enough so that I can remove the key with the engine running--and the wear is on the lock, not the key.  

 

And as an aside, it's better for the lock to use a brass key vs a steel one (like most OEM BMW keys); the lock innards are brass, and steel keys will wear the pins/wafers faster.

 

mike

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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New key might help if worn. Key grinders can make copy key a bit ”bigger” if you’ll say it’s for old & worn lock. New lock or internals is way to go in long run.

2002 -73 M2, 2002 -71 forced induction. bnr32 -91

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The lock may just need to be cleaned, the PO might have used a oil based lube on it and that will gum up the works for sure, use only a lube meant for locks after cleaning it.

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If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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2 hours ago, Monty said:

Didn't want you to think that I hadn't tried.

Still don't know how it unlocked. The car gods must have taken pity on me.

 

I'm going to look into the (+more search). See more info passed on.

 

Chas.

With the lid open, use a rod like a screwdriver shaft to trip close the latch.  Then observe the latch mechanism and the push button arm as the latch is tripped open.  The push button needs to be in unlocked position of course and  you will see what actually trips the latch.

A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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I had some lock difficulties awhile ago myself. Lotsa Vids in the linked thread show how the lock mechanism works (using the tip Jim suggested above).

 

Turning the key just rotates the position of the tab on the back end of the push button. It doesn’t do any action with the trunk retention mechanism itself.  Locked the tab misses being able to push the lever - unlocked the tab engages  the lever when you push the button.


 https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/topic/324102-trunk-lock-wud-happen/

 

 

Edited by visionaut
typos

Where we goin’? … I’ll drive…
There are some who call me... Tom too         v i s i o n a u t i k s.com   

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On a 02 you can take a 2x4 with a bit of carpet on the end and press that against the area right next to the lock and give it a wack with the heel of your hand and you can pop the trunk open, learned this trick on a club outing when someone locked their keys in the trunk, enter Dan Patzer and has encyclopedic knowledge of all things o2.

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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