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Painting over powdercoat?


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I can get the hood , trunk lid and a bunch of small parts sandblasted and powdercoated in a grey ( with zinc in it) for $250.

 

Has anyone painted over a powdercoat? would a body shop do it?

 

Anyone find a color code powdercoat to match original colors and what was the result? tia

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2 hours ago, uai said:

No one powders body (sheetmetal) 
Brackets axles wheels ok but not body parts


Au contraire.  My 1971 Alfa Romeo Montreal after coming out of the 400 degree powder coat oven  

 

 

IMG_3133.thumb.jpeg.3d99d01c00d55da1a6418f7c25d8128b.jpeg0F0634B9-2695-4060-8B4A-16DCF0C60145.thumb.jpeg.a6ae1d61dc0d33457a4ca3e77ba54771.jpeg

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If the oven is big enough yes. I used powder coating as a base on my Alfa Romeo project. The Alfa still received traditional PPG primer and paint for its final finish. 
 

Powder coating is used on race car builds that will receive vinyl wraps all the time. 

 

a powder coating finish by itself will never be as nice as traditional professional painted car. But yes you can powder coat 

 


 

 

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7 hours ago, Jeff said:


Au contraire.  My 1971 Alfa Romeo Montreal after coming out of the 400 degree powder coat oven  

 

 

IMG_3133.thumb.jpeg.3d99d01c00d55da1a6418f7c25d8128b.jpeg0F0634B9-2695-4060-8B4A-16DCF0C60145.thumb.jpeg.a6ae1d61dc0d33457a4ca3e77ba54771.jpeg


Jeff,

 

The Montreal looks fabulous in these photos. And I have previously seen photos of powdercoated vehicles. But… even though I love powdercoating, in general, I sometimes shy away from it on very visible features, such as rims, because it is often thick and uneven, obscuring fine details. Do you have any such concerns with the Montreal?

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

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I will be interested to see his response.  Regardless, the powder paint is going to need to be sanded to some extent to get anything to stick to it (like 600 grit?), then I am sure some minor work (filler) on top of that, then the various primers and final paint.  I have seen some pics of it in its 'finalish' state, really a work of art.

 

When we stripped the paint of my Alpina car, they shot it with green epoxy primer.  Not even a glimmer of rust of any sort - and that was 15 years worth.  Granted in a garage but still.  When applied correctly under the proper conditions, the stuff laaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaasts.

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I’m traveling today so it’s difficult for me to keep up. 
 

The Montreal body was done by Adam Johnson who was the body shop manager at Canepa Design in Scotts Valley CA for 25 years. He now has own private body shop in Watsonville CA. This is a process that’s been used many times at a high level. 
 

The Alfa had a powder coat bare metal primer done first then the satin black done second. It was sanded and painted with conventional PPG primer and Urethane paint after. I’m not too concerned, the expertise and quality shows up. 
 

Jeff

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Yes, sure- you'd just need to find out what, exactly, the powder coat WAS, chemically, and 

prep it accordingly.  Probably as a plastic, I'd imagine, so you'd need the right

chemical to get your choice of primer to key into it.  And possibly scuff it- or NOT, depending on the system.

 

Probably best to ask the manufacturer of the coating material.

 

400f shouldn't warp anything, nor melt the leading...

 

t

wouldn't do dat.  But curious to see how it works out.

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"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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On 2/5/2024 at 4:44 PM, Jeff said:

I’m traveling today so it’s difficult for me to keep up. 
 

The Montreal body was done by Adam Johnson who was the body shop manager at Canepa Design in Scotts Valley CA for 25 years. He now has own private body shop in Watsonville CA. This is a process that’s been used many times at a high level. 
 

The Alfa had a powder coat bare metal primer done first then the satin black done second. It was sanded and painted with conventional PPG primer and Urethane paint after. I’m not too concerned, the expertise and quality shows up. 
 

Jeff


Thanks, Jeff,

 

I misunderstood. I thought the color coat on the Montreal was also powdercoat. Your guy is using the powdercoat solely as a primer and sanding afterwards. My powdercoater in Atlanta powdercoated chassis’s — I recall seeing multiple VW’s —  but, likewise, solely as a primer, with “fine tuning” to be done through the sanding process.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

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1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

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9 hours ago, Vicleonardo1 said:

Why do that when you can just use epoxy primer? 

I’ve been thinking the same thing watching this thread unfold.

 

Im also curious to know if the Montreal in the photos really is actually powder coated as opposed to KTL/E-coat as @uai is wondering. The photos appear to show a dip strip process. Most places I know of that still offer a submersion dip strip are also in the business of KTL/E-coating. Powder and and KTL/E-coat both end up in an oven to finish the process. I’m aware of a bunch of high end restos that got KTL/E-coated, but I’ve never heard of someone powder coating a car like this. Doesn’t mean it’s never happened, I’ve just not run into before. 

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