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Building a 36-1 Trigger Wheel


jaredmac11

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I am looking to build a 36-1 trigger wheel now that the 02-again trigger wheel is NLA.  Further, Id like to be able to use AC in the future so it was never a go for me.

 

I am curious though how I can get a trigger wheel on the crank sensor.  There are a few vendors on Ebay that make tigger wheels of various inside and outside diameters.

Has anyone made their own?

 

What capabilities does a machine shop have to do this? Is this a matter of visiting shops and seeing what they can do? Or is this a DIY endeavor with a talented welder? Im thinking 2 things, one is warping and the other is an offset wheel that will wobble or be offset.  Just looking for input.   Has anyone gone done this path?

PXL_20221220_160127995.jpg

PXL_20221220_160629169.jpg

Edited by jaredmac11
Adding pics
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Cut it on a water jet machine.  I've had offers thru a friend machinist.  He and his buddies make all sorts of stuff for drag racers.

A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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This makes more sense.  Ill call around and ask if shops can do that.  Making something to spec vs buying a wheel on Ebay and slapping it on makes way more sense.

 

I also like mounting it to the inner most pulley. 

 

which pulley did you use?  Did you have the shop tap it for bolts or was it already ready to go?  also is that a 60-

Edited by jaredmac11
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A mill with a rotary table can do it.  

For a one- off, that's probably quicker.

 

The choice of material might matter- most steels will

magnetize, and at the very least, that will collect fur on

the teeth.  I don't know what Ford used on their EDIS,

but it doesn't hold magnetism- and Ford used

a magnetic sensor.

 

t

 

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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2 hours ago, jaredmac11 said:

which pulley did you use?  Did you have the shop tap it for bolts or was it already ready to go?  also is that a 60-

Pulley is std 02 cast pulley.  Hand drilled for the cap screws.  Machinist cut the wheel bore to diameter I wanted as well as the turn down of the pulley.

 

Number of teeth is of no matter, Starting wheel was a blank by Electromotive, as their missing teeth profile was developed for a variable VR pickup.  I was setting it up for use with an Electromotive ECU.  But no matter because I'm usiing a 36-1 square tooth root wheel on the S14 with a reluctor pickup and the Haltech ECU.

 

1 hour ago, jaredmac11 said:

Also, what software did you use to draft up that mock wheel?

I used Autodesk, Autosketch (a poor man's Autocad).  Not sold anymore and it doesn't work on 64bit machines.

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A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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I made a 36-2 design that will use the tii hub and bolts on. However this probably won‘t work with a/c.

The Bosch Motorsport ecu Brochure has a nice how 2 build a trigger wheel chapter on page 10
https://www.bosch-motorsport.com/media/downloads/ecu_ms_4_sport_de.pdf
these are 36-2 or 60-2 so you'll have to adapt to make it a 36-1

 

trigger.jpg

Edited by uai
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7 hours ago, SteadFast said:

Is there a reason why you're overlooking the IE option?  Used this for my conversion and it was awesome: 

 

 

I did not like that I have to remove the pin for TDC According to the Bosch Manual 95mm dia is enough for a 36 tooth wheel so I felt it would be better to do my own which "hides" behind the pulley

Edited by uai
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16 hours ago, uai said:

The Bosch Motorsport ecu Brochure has a nice how 2 build a trigger wheel chapter on page 10

Can you provide a link to a version in English, please.

 

I noticed they use the missing tooth H dimension that Electromotive developed eons ago and had the patent for.  The reason has to do with reading the first tooth reliably.  Many homebuilt wheels overlook that design.

Edited by jimk

A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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For the cutting once you draft it up you can use something like "send cut send" or metal supermarkets. I should draw one up one of these days... I need to get on my megasquirt project. As for the software, you can use something like Fusion360 for free.

-Nathan
'76 2002 in Malaga (110k Original, 2nd Owner, sat for 20 years and now a toy)
'86 Chevy K20 (6.2 Turbo Diesel build) & '46 Chevy 2 Ton Dump Truck
'74 Suzuki TS185, '68 BSA A65 Lightning (garage find), '74 BMW R90S US Spec #2

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