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What do I do about this pilot bearing?


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Here's the dilemma:

 

1.) The only pilot bearing puller I could find with a small enough I.D. flexes and falls off the pilot bearing.

2.) Hammering any kind of medium behind the pilot bearing won't work because it comes through the holes of the missing balls.

 

Does anyone have any ideas on how to get this thing out?

 

Thanks

 

 

IMG_6018.JPG

IMG_6019.JPG

'74 Verona

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Just now, halboyles said:

Have you checked with your local car parts places?  They have loaner tools including pullers of all sizes often for free!

 

I have and they don't have a puller that supports a small enough I.D.

'74 Verona

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just did mine with a slide hammer and single hook.   takes a bit of force all around..  Throw the new bearing in the freezer for 30 minutes.  makes it easier to install

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22 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

Slide hammer with a hook attachment may get it. 

 

5 minutes ago, tinkwithanr said:

just did mine with a slide hammer and single hook.   takes a bit of force all around..  Throw the new bearing in the freezer for 30 minutes.  makes it easier to install

 

 

*grumble* neither auto parts store has a hook attachment. Might have to buy online... 

 

What about a blind puller?

 

https://www.amazon.com/8milelake-Internal-Bearing-Puller-Hammer/dp/B016W8GSQ8/

 

 

'74 Verona

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When using the puller that is pictured above, to keep the arms from pulling thru, slip in the largest Allen wrench you can between the arms. Worked for me many times when otherwise the puller just pulled out.
 

pilotbearing.jpg

Edited by 02tom
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I had the same pilot bearing in my 2000ti. I ended up using a peanut butter sandwich to create the hydraulic pressure required to push it out. stuff it with a PB sandwich and pound it in there.

 

Hmmm, however you are missing a few bearings so it may not of worked after all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

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7 hours ago, Naz said:

I had the same pilot bearing in my 2000ti. I ended up using a peanut butter sandwich to create the hydraulic pressure required to push it out. stuff it with a PB sandwich and pound it in there.

 

Hmmm, however you are missing a few bearings so it may not of worked after all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Crunchy or smooth? Which works the best?

Jim Gerock

 

Riviera 69 2002 built 5/30/69 "Oscar"

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How about smearing some JB weld into the race to fill the missing bearing holes and seal it up. Then get the PB and bread out. 

 

The other thing I thought of was running in some big self tapper screws which might get enough of a bite to get a grip on. Secure a steel strap across the bearing and pull on that?

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