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glemon

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There is an automatic 74 2002 on my local craigslist, first 2002 I have seen locally since my car came up this summer, it is advertised as low miles and rust free, and looks to be fairly original from the pics.  I am assuming that the slushbox does not add to the value of a 2002, and in fact may detract from it?  or are they so rare that they do have some desirability?  Second question, is there any difference besides the boxes themselves, the console and shift levers, and the "Automatic" script I saw stuck on the back of the car?

Edited by glemon

Lincoln, NE

74 2002

68 Triumph TR250

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I've read somewhere that the automatics were desirable for their shells when you swap transmissions. Something about the trans tunnel.

Yes, the automatic transmission is larger than the manual transmission, which necessitated a larger transmission tunnel being installed by the factory. Since the 5-speed e21 transmission is also larger than the '02's factory manual transmissions, you don't have to modify an automatic's transmission tunnel with a BFH if you do the conversion to a 5-speed.

As to values, I'd bet that 30 years ago there was an appreciable detriment to a used '02's value due to an automatic transmission. But, over time, as fewer drivers are able or willing to drive manuals, and the automatic transmission stigma has been diminished by the use of automatic transmissions in some of the highest performance cars, I suspect that prices for '02's with manual and automatic transmissions are converging.

Steve

Edited by Conserv

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

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Automatics are fun, despite what people say about their 'lack' of performance. Had an auto in college1989-91 named 'Harry Smith' and absolutely loved it. The gearboxes are pretty reliable, mine had lost 1st geat and started in second for years. Replaced the engine and the tranny with a better one that had all 3 gears. Had lowerd it an inch, put Boge shocks and Tii anti-swaybars on, wish I still had that car. It was my DD from 1989-94. The Pittsburgh winters killed it, took it to a body shop and they never worked on it, they thought is was too far gone. So I parted it out in 1996.

Andrew Wilson
Vern- 1973 2002tii, https://www.bmw2002faq.com/blogs/blog/304-andrew-wilsons-vern-restoration/ 
Veronika- 1968 1600 Cabriolet, Athena- 1973 3.0 CSi,  Rodney- 1988 M5, The M3- 1997 M3,

The Unicorn- 2007 X3, Julia- 2007 Z4 Coupe, Ophelia- 2014 X3, Herman- 1914 KisselKar 4-40

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Agree with Andrew re automatics can be fun.  I had never driven one until I had a chance to drive a really nice original '74 that belongs to Tom and Missy Rakestraw out in California.  Went on a tour with a bunch of other 02ers on mountain back roads east of LA.  I discovered that if I manually shifted between 2nd and 3rd on the twisty parts, I could easily keep up with the stick shift cars.  

 

So don't be deterred by the automatic...if the rest of the car is really nice and the price is right, snap it up, enjoy it as an automatic and if you wish, start accumulating the pieces to convert to a 5 speed:  flywheel, clutch assy, driveshaft/guibo, pedal box and clutch hydraulics, and of course the 5 speed.  

 

cheers

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Excellent points above, and as the admittedly biased owner of an automatic I'll add one more.  Since enthusiasts have traditionally eschewed automatics in favor of manuals, automatics are generally less likely to have been hooned within an inch of their life.  It's no guarantee, obviously, and automatic transmissions can be more complicated/expensive to work on, but odds are better that they've lived a gentler life.  At least this has been my experience.

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I've had a former 73 E3 Bavaria that was an automatic. It was a cruiser. When the autotragic died in the Bavaria, I did the auto to five speed conversion. Wow, what a difference, it was like night and day. The Bavaria went from a cruiser to a car that was really fun to drive.  I always had a smile on my face when I drove the Bav after the 5 speed conversion. As for a 2002, I suspect the difference would be the same in a after a 5 speed conversion. I always did 4 speed to 5 speed conversions on my 02's. If you live in an urban environment, you may want to keep the slushbox.  But then again, with all of soccer mom's and teenagers driving with cell phones in suburbia, I don't recommend an 02 as a daily driver in a urban/city environment. Get an E30 if you want an old BMW for a daily driver. Use your 02 as a fun weekend car. I've never owned an automatic 02 so I can't speak from experience. Only from owning numerous manual gearbox 02's/E3/E12/E28/E30's over the past 32 years.

 

G-Man

74 tii (many mods)
91 318i M42

07 4Runner

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I shopped for an auto when buying my car.  

 

1. because it shifts at or below 3k 90% of the time.  So the motor isn't as tired.

2. you get more car for the $, usually.

3. 4 speed swap is very easy.  5 speed is easier swap than a manual car.  Tons of room.

 

I happened to find an anatomic that had been swapped to four speed two years before I found it.

2002 newbie, and dead serious about it.
(O=o00o=O)
Smart Audio Products for your 2002

 

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I don't know the seller but have had a couple of exchanges with him, if anyone is interested can provide the link, price may be a little high, but it looks to be original, and as I said claimed to be low miles and rust free, so might not be a bad base to start something with.

 

Greg

Lincoln, NE

74 2002

68 Triumph TR250

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  • 5 months later...

Hopefully bringing this to life again with a twist: I've read tons of pieces about motor swaps, transmission swaps, etc. My question is: Are there any modern automatics that could be swapped in to replace the old automatics? I would tend to think they would be more dependable and maybe have better performance?

 

Not to be a crank, but I'm just asking this specific question, not automatic as compared to manual, etc. Has anyone done it?

Edited by Skruffy2
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Yes the tunnel is wider which gives more room for trans and slave but don't forget, in a swap to 4 or 5 speed you need to replace the pedal box, brake fluid reservoir and lines, replace the flywheel as well as adding a clutch and MC, fab a new exhaust bracket. Oh the exhaust downpipe is longer than on a manual which could be a plus. I just made the swap and it was well worth it. It is like a different car. I have a big smile on every time I drive it.

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Yes the tunnel is wider which gives more room for trans and slave but don't forget, in a swap to 4 or 5 speed you need to replace the pedal box, brake fluid reservoir and lines, replace the flywheel as well as adding a clutch and MC, fab a new exhaust bracket. Oh the exhaust downpipe is longer than on a manual which could be a plus. I just made the swap and it was well worth it. It is like a different car. I have a big smile on every time I drive it.

 

Thanks, but I think you misunderstood. I was talking about swapping in a newer automatic. Not a 5 spd.

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