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Need High Beam Lights help


Go to solution Solved by tech71,

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I installed new H4 Hella lights with high and low beam but I can only get low beam to work.  Low beam relay works fine.  High beam (HB) relay works when signal lever is pulled towards driver but HB relay does not work when signal switch is pushed away from driver.  Also, when HB relay energized by pulling on signal lever, I have power on the white wire coming out of relay using my test light but no power at wiring socket at head light. Does the wire from the HB relay not go directly to the headlights?  If not, then where?  Also, is the signal switch faulty causing the HB relay not being energized when switch is pushed away from driver?

Here is a pic of the relays... HB, LB, Horn.  Any ideas where to check next guys?

Relays 2.jpg

Relays1.jpg

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1 hour ago, Randall C said:

Does the wire from the HB relay not go directly to the headlights?  If not, then where?

Looks like it goes to fuse # 11.

This looks like a job for @John76

1794867636_Lightsfuses91011.thumb.jpg.b4463f51969fe69e3042234d5b58688a.jpg

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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If the high beam flasher function works (pull lever towards you) that means the relay, its wiring and the lights themselves are all functioning, so I'd suspect the high beam stalk.  You may have to remove it from the steering column and clean the internal contacts with some tuner cleaner, then test the terminals for continuity. 

 

I suspect John76 has a continuation of the above wiring diagram that will tell you which wires on the stalk go to which destination; that'll make checking the wires a lot easier.

 

mike

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Yep, Fuse 11 protects the wiring to the high beams from the relay. Likely two issues, fuse 11 and high beam switch in the stalk. Flash and high beam on both feed the white/blue wire to the relay.

'Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right'

Robert Hunter, Scarlet Begonias.

 

Gunther March 19, 1974. Hoffman Motors march 22 1974 NYC

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The switch in the stalk could definitely be the issue, and it could be something as simple as dust in there. I had this exact issue after paint and I just had to cycle the switch ~50 times while blowing compressed air into it. Started working again. 

 

I’d also check continuity on the yellow/white wire.  When you flash hi beams, the switch is bridging to ignition acc (green wire) to pull power. That’s why you can flash highs when the headlights are turned off. Pushing the stalk forward to turn on hi beams bridges power from the yellow/white wire, so that only works when the headlights are turned on.  
 

 If you don’t have power on the yellow/white at the stalk when the headlights are on, it would give you the condition you mention. 

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Apparently a common problem. I have number 3 stalk switch waiting to go in, (#2 was supposedly good!!!) but i'm wondering if there is another reason for being able to flash the high beams with the stalk pulled but not have them come on with the stalk pushed.

Les

'74 '02 - Jade Touring (RHD)

'76 '02 - Delk's "Da Beater"

FAQ Member #17

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17 minutes ago, Randall C said:

Got it fixed.  Wiggled #11 and presto. 

Lesson #1 when dealing with 2002 electrical problems:

1.  Check the relevant fuse--don't just wiggle it, pull it out and inspect for wear and corrosion

2.  Check the relevant fuse

3.  Check the relevant fuse

4. If it still doesn't work it's either

    a.  something else

    b.  It's on a non-fused circuit

 

mike

  • Like 2

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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