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What is this lever/heat sink in my center console?


Birdie
Go to solution Solved by Mike Self,

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Worth mentioning that I bought this 1976 2002 yesterday. I am completely new to BMW's and car wrenching in general. Was doing my first at-home once over this morning and came across this lever and heat sink in the console. It doesn't appear factory and doesn't seem to have any effect on the idle. It would appear that the heat/cooling blower does not work so may be related to that but wouldn't be able confirm. Sorry I don't know more but thought I would ask before digging in further.image.thumb.jpeg.2243f9fc675356754990c91d2f7caa8e.jpeg

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First of all welcome to the faq! That heat sink is not stock, my guess is it's a old stereo componet or maybe a electronic ignition brain.

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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I’ll guess external amp for the Yamaha. Looks like power wiring on the left.

 

The “lever” ( strapping) looks to be part of the console/stereo headunit installation. The white cap is likely intended to reduce scratches on the console bottom. It probably shouldn’t swivel like a lever.

 

Where we goin’? … I’ll drive…
There are some who call me... Tom too         v i s i o n a u t i k s.com   

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Thanks everyone. You are right, the sink is probably stereo related and the 'lever' is not a 'lever' at all but rather, a kickstand to keep the head unit from bouncing up and down. Well, the old Yamaha will be coming out pretty soon so all will be revealed.  thanks.

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I have seen two radios suspended by a metal strip with holes:  from the back of the unit upward to a fastening screw/bolt...somewhere.  Yes, it, is some way (from the top or bottom) steadies the unit and prevents its up/down movement.

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  • Solution
1 hour ago, 2002#3 said:

I have seen two radios suspended by a metal strip with holes:  from the back of the unit upward to a fastening screw/bolt...somewhere. 

When I installed the JC Whitney special AM/FM radio in my shiny new '69, I used a similar strap to support the back side of the radio .  Ran the strap up and fastened it to the steel bracket into which the ashtray was mounted.  My '69 is now on its fourth radio, and I'm still using that same strap.  So I guess it works...

 

mike

 

PS--welcome to the 02 fraternity/sorority--and that's a classic old Yamaha AM/FM/Cassette player--very high end, state-of-the-art unit back in the day...

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Ya, that strap is to hold the back of the radio from flopping around.  Because it's a two-hole radio it relieves the strain because most of them went into a plastic frame.  DIN format radios don't typically have them. 

 

I suspect it may be an antenna booster that you are seeing.  They are old school and a way to get better reception.   Not really needed now with modern transmitters. 

 

 

 

 

"Goosed" 1975 BMW 2002

 

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