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Bleeding brakes after full overhaul - tips?


Pablo M

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Recently went through majority of my brake system:

-new calipers/pads/rotors

-new drums/shoes/wheel cylinders

-new stainless steel lines

-new reservoir and lines to master cylinder

 

Prior to this had sufficient brake pedal but leaking components (WC mostly) and knew refresh would help. 
 

System completely drained when I removed the rubber lines. Reservoir I replaced after all the components had been replaced. Original Master Cylinder and slave remain. 
 

I bled the brakes (my son helping with pedal pumping) and got a lot of air out. I think I need to do it again as way more came out the fronts than I got at the back, and I still have a pedal that goes nearly

to the floor before any braking happens. Tomorrow will redo. 
 

Made me think though…am I doing it right? I’m doing the typical RR first, then LR, then RF and finishing with LF. Fronts I did top bleeder first, then outer, then inner.

That’s it though.  
 

Am I doing it right? Am I missing any steps?

advice welcome!
pablo 
 

 

 

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

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A power bleeder will help when you're starting with a fully drained system.  

 

mike

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59 minutes ago, Mike Self said:

A power bleeder will help when you're starting with a fully drained system.  

 

mike

I have one but in searching I came across info that suggested pumping manually would be better. I’ll try the power bleeder at 15psi and see what happens. 

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

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18 minutes ago, PhilC said:

I believe the correct order for the fronts is - inner, outer, upper.

That’s not what the Brake Bleeding Article here in the FAQ says. 

Although we both got it wrong. It says upper, inner, outer. 
 

p-

 

 

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

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Pump manually until pedal is firm

Release the bleeder at wheel into a catch can. 

 

Passenger rear

Driver rear

Top off reservoir

Passenger front

Driver front 

 

Not much more to the process. 

 

***Added info: With the fronts do the top bleeder last. 

 

 

Edited by conkitchen
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But what do I know

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6 minutes ago, tech71 said:

Sounds like you are almost there so no real reason to go all "power bleeder"

One more time around per above should do it.

Dont forget your clutch circuit😉

Clutch. I didn’t do anything with the clutch. What should be done there? I didn’t come across anything related to clutch as part of brake bleeding, but was wondering about that since it’s the same reservoir. 

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

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Use power bleeder. 10psi max.  Open bleed screw. Leave it open.  Pump brake pedal half dozen times. Close bleed screw.  Check reservoir level.  Move to another corner.

 

It makes no difference whatsoever which corner you do first.  It is an old wives tale that you have to do furthest from mc first.

 

 

And make sure you adjust the rear brakes before you bleed the brakes.

Edited by M3M3M3

2xM3

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Just now, M3M3M3 said:

Use power bleeder. 10psi max.  Open bleed screw. Leave it open.  Pump brake pedal half dozen times. Close bleed screw.  Check reservoir level.  Move to another corner.

 

It makes no difference whatsoever which corner you do first.  It is an old wives tale that you have to do furthest from mc first.

Don't let my wife hear you called her old 

  • Haha 1

But what do I know

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This is the way that I have been bleeding systems ( all kinds of cars ) for years and all by myself.     So simple       get an old clear plastic pop bottle, drill a hole ( or 2 ) in the lid so a hose can get thru it, fill the bottle about a 1/4 full, make sure the end of the hose in the bottle stays under the top of the fluid 

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