Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Electric Fuel Pump Installation Instructions?


Hokie09

Recommended Posts

I searched and found a hundred threads arguing electric vs. mechanical, 2 vs 4 vs 9psi, let's not make another one.

 

I'm looking for a guide, directions, or pictures from anyone who has successfully installed one, especially the electrical side with ignition sources, etc.

 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i use a carter that i purchased from TEP its rated at 4psi and i dont use a pressure regulator. the carb is weber type 38/38 dgas i get between 12-15 mpg also use cable linkage from redline with megajolt edis ignition. i would recomend this configuration to any 02 out there so much better then 32/36 weber, mechanical fuel pump and distributer ignition. also if you decide to go with electronic fuel pump make sure you use a relay and also some type of emergancy switch. i wouldnt mind working with you on your project as long as your not to far away. im at jaguar1658@att.net 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For records keeping purposes I'll follow up with what I did.  I installed a Carter pump mounted along the passenger rocker panel underneath the car basically under the passenger's seat.  There's an indent in the floor that looks like it was almost made for that purpose.  I couldn't find an easy mounting place closer to the tank that was away from moving parts, road debris, exhaust heat, etc.  And this place is about as low as you can get.  

 

I cut the factory line running through the car, ran it out underneath the car to the pump and filter, then back into the car to meet the factory line again with all connections outside of the car in the event of a leak.  The pump is grounded to the clamp bolted into the chassis, and the power lead runs in the car to the dash where I have an emergency kill switch, then through the firewall and tapped into a green/white wire going into the #12 fuse which is ignition-switched and seemed to be the best candidate based on a wiring diagram I was sort-of able to read.

 

I have a Weber 32/36 carb on the car which the previous owner had installed, and at that point I'm assuming they capped the factory return line which I've found on installation instructions for the carb so I'm assuming this is typical.  After much deliberation reading online and asking friends, I decided to just dead head the pump feed line into the carb (passes through a gauge manifold to verify pressure).  I'm getting a hair under 3psi at the carb with this setup.

 

Car isn't running yet due to no spark condition/distributor issues, but getting pressure to the carb.  I'll update later once this thing is hopefully running.

Edited by Hokie09
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi--

I recommend a Facet (now owned by Purolator, located in Elmira, NY) electric fuel pump.  I found the OEM mechanical pumps seemed to last 25-30K miles (including the one in my late '73 when I bought it new, and 2 others).  The Facet Cube pumps are not failure-free, but last longer.  I think 1 reason some failed (sourced no-name from JC Whitney) is they could have been 7psi instead of the 2-4psi that works better.  I always used a fuel pressure regulator to provide low pressure to the Weber carburetor.  I had one failure with a broken diaphragm; I think it may have been caused by then-new gasahol, although Facet engineers say they are in recent decades totally compatible with ethanol. However they do need a 75 micron or better intake filter (I used a simple paper filter as from a 1960's American car).  My latest Facet pump was a Posi-Flow (fits the same footprint as a Cube) which pumped flawlessly.

 

An excellent location is immediately behind your gas tank, on the tank mounting ledge.  There is room to run and turn the tubing from the tank and filter then connect to the thru-car tube.  Neoprene fuel tubing provides flexibility to hook the 1/8" pipe fittings (1/8-27) to the metric tube and tube barb.  I used 16 gauge vinyl-insulated wire for the switched +12Volt wire, running from the fusebox through the car into the trunk (Facet says their pumps draw about 2 Amps or less).  Some people suggest an oil-pressure cutout switch although I did not need one; it could delay getting gas into a dry carburetor bowl.

 

In my opinion a spare fuel pump is a good item to carry in your car (maybe in a box under the rear seat); that way if you have a failure you do not need to reroute the windshield washer tubing to your carb to get home!

Larry Ayers

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

’73 Malaga— first car, now gone

'74tii Malaga

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Carter pump in trunk.

 

Tank -> Fuel line -> Filter -> Pump (trunk) -> fuel line -> Filter King Filter/Regulator (engine bay) -> carbs

 

I ran the power line inside the car through the firewall and UNDER the fuse box. Pulled the fuse box and soldered the lead to a triggered circuit when the key is in 2nd position from O. I cannot recall which one I tapped. I just used a multi meter to pick which one.

 

Scott

 

IMG_0515.jpg

 

3_wire_locationscopy.jpg

Edited by sislane

1976 2002 Custom Dk Blue w/ Pearl

1975 2002A Sahara (sold Feb 2008)

SiteNamecopy.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Larry, Good input thanks!  My project is a little rushed so I can get this thing running before a pending move, but down the road I could see changing my setup similar to your description.

 

Scott I can tell by the pics your car is pretty fun.  I read some people doing truck mounts but more people saying its too much of a safety risk so I avoided it.  Undoubtedly like many things one mishap caused a bit of a stir over in-car mounts but I'm sure a good clean install like yours is about as safe as you can get.

 

Thanks both for the input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

JUST AN OPINION :

 

3_wire_locationscopy.jpg

 

one hard bump in the road,

or

one hard shift will make the motor jump enough to

hit this filter and cause a leak, a fire, worse.

Not the ideal mounting position.

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a G-Switch from a Ford Contour for electric fuel pump shut-off.

The G-Switch will cut off all power to the pump if anyone hits you.

Contours and Mystiques are nice donor cars for the G-Switch because it is on the left kick panel and easy to get to.

I mounted the switch on the left kick panel just like the donor car.

You can pick these switches up from almost any Ford at a junkyard for cheap.

Frank,  SaharaX2
'75 2002 Sahara (Janice)
'74 2002 Sahara (Camilla) dearly departed
'76 2002 Anthrazit (Gonzo) now daughters car

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

JUST AN OPINION :

 

3_wire_locationscopy.jpg

 

one hard bump in the road,

or

one hard shift will make the motor jump enough to

hit this filter and cause a leak, a fire, worse.

Not the ideal mounting position.

Thanks for pointing that out cd. I think the picture makes it look worse than it actually is, and the Strut/Engine brace I have on keeps the motor from moving much. I think the motor is too far forward of the filter to touch, but I'll take a close look now that you point it out.

 

---- The motor is forward of the glass and 1 1/4" below the metal outlet. The bracket is also flexable.

post-33489-0-64880600-1369571282_thumb.j

post-33489-0-81504600-1369571292_thumb.j

post-33489-0-19377400-1369571305_thumb.j

Edited by sislane

1976 2002 Custom Dk Blue w/ Pearl

1975 2002A Sahara (sold Feb 2008)

SiteNamecopy.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

post-40127-0-46063600-1371879791_thumb.j Hey fella 02'ers! Any of you run into erratic fuel gauge after installing your electric pump, i.e. fuel gauge needle bouncing around?  I run a carter round style P60504 mounted in the engine bay.  This fuel pump supposed to run around 2psi, as what many of our 02 members run.   I probe the ground with my digital meter to the fuel tank and was fine.  I have not checked the voltage regulator...any thoughts?  This pump runs pretty quiet.

 

Thanks.

2002cool2

2002cool2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

attachicon.gifIMAG0623.jpg Hey fella 02'ers! Any of you run into erratic fuel gauge after installing your electric pump, i.e. fuel gauge needle bouncing around?  I run a carter round style P60504 mounted in the engine bay.  This fuel pump supposed to run around 2psi, as what many of our 02 members run.   I probe the ground with my digital meter to the fuel tank and was fine.  I have not checked the voltage regulator...any thoughts?  This pump runs pretty quiet.

 

Thanks.

2002cool2

cooincidence maybe? My fuel gauge has never acted funky in the 5 years I've had an electric pump.

 

Scott

Edited by sislane

1976 2002 Custom Dk Blue w/ Pearl

1975 2002A Sahara (sold Feb 2008)

SiteNamecopy.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this is my post of 3/12 on the install on my 75. Stock fuel supply line removed, stock steel return line used as a supply line to carb with filter before carb, Pump mounted under car with protective box and filter in line from tank, pump is wired with a relay , relay is activated from the coil + through a inertia switch mounted under the passenger seat, which breaks the circuit and turns off the pump in the case of a crash . Hot + wire comes from the 325 junction box on the fire wall fused it runs through the relay and back to the pump . negative pump wire is grounded to the body. 32/36 Weber with CD's jeting 3.5psi pump runs fine.

  • DSCN0648.JPG

 .

  • DSCN0646.JPG
    • DSCN0639.JPG
    • DSCN0638.JPG
    DSCN0647.JPG
    • DSCN0644.JPG
      • DSCN0643.JPG
Edited by harry6422
  • Like 1

1975 BMW 2002 Taiga

2000 BMW M Roadster evergreen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I am having problems with what appears to be vapor lock. When my car gets hot it dies out. There is no fuel in the fuel filter, which to me appears to be a vapor lock since the mechanical pump won't pump vaporized fuel. The fuel line doesn't seem too close to engine which would cause the fuel to get too hot. The mechanical fuel filter was bad and I replaced it but it is still doing it.

I am thinking I should add a pusher pump back at the tank. I have read the posts in the past regarding adding electric fuel pumps. I was planning on putting in a Carter P4070 pump and a Painless Wiring Fuel Pump relay.

 

So my questions are:

  1. Is there anything I should consider before doing an electrical pump that might fix the issue?
  2. Assuming the electrical pump is the right answer, are there any issues with keeping the mechanical pump or do I need to remove it? 

 

Some info on my car:

  • Weber 38 - new
  • Bored 1 mm over
  • Tii pistons
  • Schrick 284 cam
  • new mechanical fuel pump.

Thanks everyone!!!

 

JT

post-41151-0-02584000-1405277580_thumb.j

post-41151-0-52964100-1405281694_thumb.j

1976 2002 Fjord Blue

2013 750iLX Alpine White

2008 Porsche Boxster Meteor Gray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t

  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...