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Functional Test


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JimK is always so busy…

 

Lets see the pedal you chose 😁

 

So, it talks to the Haltec, right?

 

EdZ

'69 Granada... long, long ago  

'71 Manila..such a great car

'67 Granada 2000CS...way cool

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1 hour ago, Dudeland said:

DBW correct?

Yes, I didn't press the pedal very fast, I was being careful to not have it over stroke.  The pedal was wired this afternoon shortly before the video.

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A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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1 hour ago, zinz said:

So, it talks to the Haltec, right?

Pedal feeds the ECU with dual position sensors.  ECU sends a command to move the controller.  Controller has dual TPS sensors.  Dual sensor are used for safety.  Sensors in each pair are compared and if differ, the controller is moved to the power off position (zero throttle).

This setup includes a cruise control and fast idle functions.

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A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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42 minutes ago, jimk said:

Pedal feeds the ECU with dual position sensors.  ECU sends a command to move the controller.  Controller has dual TPS sensors.  Dual sensor are used for safety.  Sensors in each pair are compared and if differ, the controller is moved to the power off position (zero throttle).

This setup includes a cruise control and fast idle functions.

You have 2 sensors sensing sensors?

 

😁

  • Haha 1

Ray

Stop reading this! Don't you have anything better to do?? :P
Two running things. Two broken things.

 

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On 3/21/2024 at 8:31 PM, jimk said:

Yes, I didn't press the pedal very fast, I was being careful to not have it over stroke.  The pedal was wired this afternoon shortly before the video.

That is super cool.  MS3 had a company that did DBW, but I think they didn't last.    Are you doing any funky traction control?.  If you want boost by gear you may want to take a look at this video.  I was wondering how to sense what gear I am in and send it to the MS3.

 

 

 

 

 

"Goosed" 1975 BMW 2002

 

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Traction control requires a wheel sensor on each wheel.  Not a boosted engine, but others have many examples, I haven't looked at them, because I'm not interested.

Gear detection I use is a computed gear, after calibrating against gear ratios, road speed and rpm.

A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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9 hours ago, jimk said:

Traction control requires a wheel sensor on each wheel.  Not a boosted engine, but others have many examples, I haven't looked at them, because I'm not interested.

Gear detection I use is a computed gear, after calibrating against gear ratios, road speed and rpm.

 

Sorry I was talking about two different things.  I agree that the boost by gear is a completely different program.  I am sure it is unnecessary for all but the largest of V8 boosted cars, but it would be cool to be able to log it. 

 

For traction control, technically all you need is a wheel sensor on one front wheel and another on the drive axle. The computer will try to keep the ratio of the two in sync with the acceptable amount of slip. If they get out of sync then the DBW allows the throttle to be cut. Of course it won't be anything like a car with ABS that can apply the brake to individual wheels.

 

 

"Goosed" 1975 BMW 2002

 

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13 hours ago, tzei said:

Boost by gear is very good feature indeed. Only boost by speed is better.

I don't really understand the advantage of boost by gear, unless you are drag racing and can count on additional traction due to aero.   #Streetoutlaws LOL :). 

 

I can see how knowing what gear you were in being helpful when you read the logs, but even then you can pretty much derive that by your speed and RPM. 

 

 

 

Edited by Dudeland

"Goosed" 1975 BMW 2002

 

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