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Valve adjustment procedure 


schuetz1619
Go to solution Solved by Mike Self,

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I’ve always followed the procedure of setting valves one cylinder at a time after rotating the crankshaft to TDC on that piston. But is this really necessary?

 

Would you not get a proper result by adjusting the clearance at any position of the camshaft, as long as the subject valve is completely closed (i.e, the cam is riding the circular part of the shaft)? Or does adjustment at TDC eliminate error one might have otherwise from slop in the system?

 

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Lazy guy's way:

 

Put the car in 4th (or 5th if you've got it) and look for cylinders where both valves are closed.  If none are that way, adjust the valves that are obviously closed.  Write down which ones you did so you can keep track.  Then roll the car forward--or backward--to find additional valves as they close and adjust 'em.  Pretty soon you will have done all eight. 

 

mike

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'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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12 hours ago, schuetz1619 said:

 

I’ve always followed the procedure of setting valves one cylinder at a time after rotating the crankshaft to TDC on that piston. But is this really necessary?

 

Would you not get a proper result by adjusting the clearance at any position of the camshaft, as long as the subject valve is completely closed (i.e, the cam is riding the circular part of the shaft)? Or does adjustment at TDC eliminate error one might have otherwise from slop in the system?

 

No difference either way.  Check all of them and you are done.

M10 is a piece of cake compared to a S14 that has shims.

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A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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Here's what I do:

 

1.  I remove the spark plugs, that way I can rotate the engine by pushing on the fan.

 

2.  I rotate the engine so that one of the rocker arms (any of 'em) is on the flat part of it's cam lobe (thus the valve is fully closed).  I then adjust that valve.

 

2a.  Then using my handy dandy chart:  there is also another valve that is fully closed, and I then adjust that valve ........

 

image.png.f4705e0163891dfe65855b98f69476cd.png

 

3.  Then I again rotate the engine to get another fully closed valve.  I adjust that valve, and then it's match according to the above chart.

 

4.  Then another engine rotation, etc. etc. to get all 8 valves adjusted.

 

5.  Then I clean the spark plugs, gap 'em, lube 'em, install 'em, tighten 'em, and install the plug wires.

 

Cheers,

 

Carl

 

Edited by OriginalOwner
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Great map by Carl showing which valves are closed together.   It makes me want to check my valves even though I don't think they need it.  I use a remote starter (with the ignition off of course) to rotate the crank to get the valves in the proper position without removing the sparkplugs.  I like to use the orange underhood diagnostic port for the remote starter connection.    Number 7 (upper left) connects to the starter so you don't have to reach down to attach it to the starter solenoid. 

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Yeah, same same, I just pull my plugs, rotate to TDC with the fan, and adjust.

 

Some people do each valve at a time, but if you start at TDC, both valves are closed, so it's a good reference point to start at, and can do each cylinder at once.

 

 

Edited by 72MetallicMalaga

'72 Metallic Malaga 2002 with a '73 M10 | Dual Weber DCOE 40s | E21 5spd and LSD | Pertronix II

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