Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Headlight Help


MarkC
Go to solution Solved by ingramlee,

Recommended Posts

Commuted to work in my Tii yesterday morning and when I turned the headlights on, there was a noticeable delay (1 sec or so) from when I pulled the dash knob to when the lights actually illuminated.

 

Car drove flawlessly to/from work.

 

Yesterday evening I went to drive the car and the headlights (low beam) would not illuminate.

  • Engine was running
  • High beams still work if you pulled back on the turn signal lever, but did not illuminate if you pushed it forward (or I would've just drove it like that)
  • All other lights were functioning (turn signals, marker lights, brakes, etc.)

 

I checked fuses, all were intact but did not have time to look into it further as I needed to be somewhere.

 

I plan to look into this over the weekend - appreciate any direction on where to start testing things.

 

TIA

Mark C.

'74 Tii Atlantik

'74 Golf (RIP)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, John_in_VA said:

If you have dual-filament H4 bulbs (or even sealed beams) it is possible for the low beam portion to be burned out.

https://www.rallylights.com/light-bulbs/l/h-4

Perhaps, I will check those... seems odd that they both would be delayed illuminating together in the morning and then both not be working at the same time in the evening.  I've had bulbs burn out in cars within quick succession but not at the same exact time.  Thanks for the response.

Mark C.

'74 Tii Atlantik

'74 Golf (RIP)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Solution

Same thing happened to me a few months ago. I took the headlight switch apart... very carefully... and thoroughly cleaned the inside with contact cleaner.  Put it back together and it's worked perfectly ever since. I did have to wrap the switch with a ty-wrap to keep it together, but it works. Nobody sees it behind the console anyway.

(1973 Fjord Blue 037) Vin 2588314- Build date February 6th, 1973- delivered to Hoffman Motors NYC February 8th.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ingramlee said:

Same thing happened to me a few months ago. I took the headlight switch apart... very carefully... and thoroughly cleaned the inside with contact cleaner.  Put it back together and it's worked perfectly ever since. I did have to wrap the switch with a ty-wrap to keep it together, but it works. Nobody sees it behind the console anyway.

Good to know...  I looked at the diagram, how does the switch come out of the dash (so I don't mangle anything up)?

 

UPDATE: Disregard, been searching around on here and found other posts.

Edited by MarkC
Found answer to follow-up question asked

Mark C.

'74 Tii Atlantik

'74 Golf (RIP)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The headlight relays can become balky over time, leading to the delay you mentioned.  Prying off the cover to inspect & clean the contacts may lead to favorable results!

  • Like 3

John in VA

'74 tii "Juanita"  '85 535i "Goldie"  '86 535i "M-POSSTR"  

'03 530i "Titan"  '06 330ci "ZHPY"

bmw_spin.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, John_in_VA said:

The headlight relays can become balky over time,

Yes indeed. Check the relays before tearing into the switch (although still a good idea to keep clean).

Here's a map of the relays... should be similar for all square tails.

 

1563452334_Fuse9-11.thumb.jpg.efa7acc4c6cee7c0959d43a21d1a8753.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You didn't indicate what year your tii is, but only squarelights have relays on their headlights, and then only on the low beams.  Roundies do not have relayed headlights--and six fuse roundies dont even have fuses for their headlights.  

 

Since you've checked your fuses--didja put your finger on the relevant fuse while the headlights were on to see if it was hot? Hot fuse = poor contact.  

 

Since you had a malfunction of both low and high beams, I'd suggest looking at the high/low beam stalk; that's the only place where circuits for both low and high beams meet.  It might just need a bit of cleaning inside (tuner cleaner) or the contacts may be burned.  Remember, without a relay all that current for those headlights pass through that poor little switch--same as the headlight switch.  For 12 fuse roundies, it's relatively easy to add a relay to the wiring; I did that for the high beams on my '73 many years ago, and it works well.  PM if you'd like a copy of the relevant column.

 

Cheers

mike

  • Like 1

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Mike Self said:

You didn't indicate what year your tii is, but only squarelights have relays on their headlights, and then only on the low beams.  Roundies do not have relayed headlights--and six fuse roundies dont even have fuses for their headlights.  

 

Since you've checked your fuses--didja put your finger on the relevant fuse while the headlights were on to see if it was hot? Hot fuse = poor contact.  

 

Since you had a malfunction of both low and high beams, I'd suggest looking at the high/low beam stalk; that's the only place where circuits for both low and high beams meet.  It might just need a bit of cleaning inside (tuner cleaner) or the contacts may be burned.  Remember, without a relay all that current for those headlights pass through that poor little switch--same as the headlight switch.  For 12 fuse roundies, it's relatively easy to add a relay to the wiring; I did that for the high beams on my '73 many years ago, and it works well.  PM if you'd like a copy of the relevant column.

 

Cheers

mike

Only issue was the low beams, high beams functioned pulling back on the stalk, they just wouldn’t stay on when pushing it forward.

Mark C.

'74 Tii Atlantik

'74 Golf (RIP)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Update/Solved:

 

It was the headlight switch behind the dash. Pulled everything apart, found one I had from a ‘74 parts stash, swapped it in & I saw the light.

 

Thanks everyone for all the help.

 

Now I can take my time cleaning up and/or repairing the bad one for a spare.

  • Like 1

Mark C.

'74 Tii Atlantik

'74 Golf (RIP)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...