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Fiberglass Repairs and Temperatures


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The use of fiberglass for automotive repairs requires a warm temperature for good cures.  The usually recommended ideal temperature is around 70 F which provides quite a nice comfortable and pleasant ambiance, indeed, for both the car and me.  However, my garage is quite cold these days (40-50 F), and 70 F is not going to happen until Spring.

 

Have any of you used heat lamps to provide a warm temperature for a repair site, e.g., spare tire well, while working with fiberglass? 

Your experiences and suggestions regarding raising the temperature of a specific site for a few hours?
Suggestions for lamps?

 

Thanks.

 

Larry

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I have used electric radiators and halogen lamps for this purpose. I have covered curing parts with plastic tarps (? correct word?), plywood sheets etc. Coverage has been well away from heated area, at least one meter and not that sealed so air can move somewhat freely. Halogen lamps have been 150 - 300 W range. I have aimed for 50 - 60 C curing temps (max). When i'm done adjusting tarps and heat source(s) to get said temps then a have left things be over night. 

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My garage is not heated and is great for cooling my beer if the kitchen refrigerator is full.  I've tried everything to heat the garage easily, quickly, and to summer temperatures for painting and general comfort (while laying on my back on the concrete).

 

A compact, 4800w, 240v, "garage" heater does the trick.  It was $100 at Home Depot.  One of the best investments I've made.  It also has a thermostat so it is not running all the time, otherwise my power bill would be crazy.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dyna-Glo-Pro-4-800-Watt-240-Volt-Electric-Garage-Heater-EG4800DGP/304663393

 

I can heat the garage to 70°F in 20 minutes.  It's a beast!

Heater.jpg

 

I parked the heater in front of my car while I used rust inhibitor and oil-based paints to refinish the bottom of the car.  I opened the garage door 18" to allow the forced air (and fumes) to escape the garage.  In the following picture it was -4°C (24°F) outside.  22°C (70°F) in the garage.  I love my heater!

 

Drywall Heater1.jpg

 

Gauges.jpg

 

Edited by PaulTWinterton
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Thanks, Paul.  Impressive heater, indeed.  I have a propane torpedo heater (also Dyna Glow; also Home Depot) which gets my large (really tall ceiling) 2-bay workably warm, say 55 degrees, on extremely cold days.  However, I don't want to use it for this purpose - just heating around 1 sq ft of metal.  Sure wish I had 220V.

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