Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Question - water/coolant jacket on bottom of intake manifold


Recommended Posts

Hi all - 

 

I'm in the process of swapping out the one-barrel intake manifold on my car with a Cannon intake manifold to go with a Weber 32/36.  Based on the threads here, I'm reinstalling the water/coolant jacket that attaches to the bottom of the intake manifold.  Other than the paper gasket that goes here, do I need anything?  Would gasket sealer do any harm if I put some on there as well?  

 

 

cannon intake.jpg

-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, laundromatt said:

Hi all - 

 

I'm in the process of swapping out the one-barrel intake manifold on my car with a Cannon intake manifold to go with a Weber 32/36.  Based on the threads here, I'm reinstalling the water/coolant jacket that attaches to the bottom of the intake manifold.  Other than the paper gasket that goes here, do I need anything?  Would gasket sealer do any harm if I put some on there as well? 

 

I have used both gasket and rtv or even the gooier permatex aviation form-a-gasket.  The only problem with sealing the conjunction of two surfaces is when one or both parts are irregular and do not mate well, impairing any seal, let alone one that is under pressure.  So, if you have the ability to clean and machine each part before assembly, it may go a long way to avoiding future problems.  Too much rtv or any sealant and poorly cut gaskets merely pose the risk of entering the cooling system and clogging things.  Overall, IMHO, the risk tends to be fairly low, unless your system is compromised by years of accumulated gunk and corrosion.

 

With respect to Toby, the notion of corrosion with a paper gasket is minimized if the system is maintained by frequent coolant replacement and regular flushing of contaminants.  There are plenty of other paper gaskets serving a similar purpose, e.g., the waterpump gasket.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

if the system is maintained

Yuppers, no argument there.

 

But after pulling apart decades of cars,

corrosion on paper gasketted coolant passages

is pretty common...  RTV, a lot less so.

 

Just what I've found,

t

 

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks all.  The existing intake manifold had the paper gasket, and it's held up.  I think I'll go with the new gasket + small amount of RTV.  If it fails, I'll report back here for the next person who tackles this to see.  

-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not just about cold weather (though that obviously makes it worse). The action of the fuel being vaporised in the carbs reduces the temperature of the charge. This can mean icing of the carbs and the fuel is more likely to condense back out of the charge in the manifold due to the cold.   Long, twisty manifolds like the downdraft one are likely to work better every where with heat. 

rtheriaque wrote:

Carbs: They're necessary and barely controlled fuel leaks that sometimes match the air passing through them.

My build blog:http://www.bmw2002faq.com/blog/163-simeons-blog/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/24/2017 at 2:52 PM, Fatherof3 said:

In the Bay area couldn't you skip the cover and necessary plumbing?

 

Yeah, I thought about it, but it seems like it could only help, and I have the jacket anyway, so I'm going to go that route.  

 

I should add that it can get into the mid 30s in the winter here sometimes.  I probably wouldn't be taking my 2002 in those conditions, but in case I need to for whatever reason, I wanted to have it on there.  

 

 

-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I removed the coolant hoses to the manifold one summer to test it. If it was below 75 degrees here in Georgia, the carb would ice and barely run. I would have to stop and let the carb thaw before i could drive again. The manifold needs water heating in my opinion and experience. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...