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Rust behind the trim holes

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One of my "problem areas" on my mint car is the rust that formed around all the body trim.

On the outside of the panels, no worry.  Wire wheel, scrub with muriatic acid, weld the hole shut, prime it and if there are pits fill them with body filler.

How can you get to the rust that formed from that evil trim on the inside of the panels though?

 

I don't plan on putting the trim back on my car.  I hate holes through the body like that.  But I also don't want rust through a few years down the line from the rust that was left on the blind side of the panel.

 

 

Zach

 

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In areas you don't have direct access to but an get to with spray products use rust converter (phosphoric or tannic acid not muriatic) after it is dry spray with body wax

Edited by Fatherof3

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Hi Zach, I seem to like adding to your posts... I have the same problem with the trim holes on my 76 mint car.  I bought a small sand blaster, which has a catch bag for the spent sand and rubber tips that you can choose from, to push the gun up against the panel and isolate the blasting.  I think I will try that on some of mine, before treating/priming/painting.

 

As for the back sides, as well as other 'enclosed' areas, TobyB has recommended a product, which I will have to search for.  I think it was made by 3M?  Eastwood sells something similar, I think.  Anyway, it comes with like a three foot tube that has a sprayer on the end and you can snake it back into panels and spray, as you pull it out.  I want to do that to my whole car, basically, but unfortunately, I put it off and did not do it when I first bought the car five years ago.  I'll bet I would not be seeing the blisters at the bottom of my doors, if I had used it right away.

 

I did pour some rust converter in there, but it was only so successful.  While it may convert the rust, it does not provide protection.  Toby's stuff is like a waxy oil, in fact that may be the name of one such product, now that I think about it... "waxoil?"  I poured Ospho in some of the holes along the trunk and hood seams, hoping it would help.  It is a phosphoric acid containing product.  Good stuff, but the stuff with the long tube will be better.  I NEED to do that.

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35 minutes ago, '76Mintgrun'02 said:

product, now that I think about it... "waxoil?"  I poured Ospho in some of the holes along the trunk and hood seams, hoping it would help.  It is a phosphoric acid containing product.  Good stuff, but the stuff

Amsoil Heavy Duty MP is a wax compound when it dries.  Used it on a block in outdoor storage for 3 years and when wiped off with solvent, bores were shiny as when the stuff was applied.  I use it on all threaded fasteners under the car to prevent corrosion.

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1 hour ago, '76Mintgrun'02 said:

I did pour some rust converter in there, but it was only so successful.  While it may convert the rust, it does not provide protection.  Toby's stuff is like a waxy oil, in fact that may be the name of one such product, now that I think about it... "waxoil?"

 

Bilstein makes/made Waxoyl.

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Homemade rust preventive etc (this is not me, copied)

 

I've found a homemade rust preventive that I use down here on the gulf coast (salt water 10 feet from my back door) that works really good. 
 
Get a gallon of mineral spirits in a bucket. Throw in 1lb ground up paraffin wax or you can buy a couple of toilet bowl wax rings. Grind up the wax and mix it with the mineral spirits.  
 
It will take several weeks to dissolve on its own, or you can do like I do and use a cheap aquarium heater to heat the solution up to dissolve the wax. Once the wax is dissolved you add about a quart of light non-detergent oil like SAE 30. 
 
The way the stuff works is the wax and oil stay in solution (mineral spirits) which makes it easy to spray in every nook and cranny. Once sprayed the mineral spirits evaporates and leaves a oily/waxy covering over the surface. 
 
If you scratch the wax, the oil from the wax around it will creep into the crack and protect it.  
 
I tested this stuff by taking a foot long piece of bare steel and sanding nice and smooth. I sprayed it with the mineral spirits/wax/oil mix and hung it off my dock so it would be under water at high tide and exposed at low tide. 
 
After a month there isn't a speck of rust on it. I even took a nail and gouged the wax off to see what would happen. In the spot where I gauged it down there is still no rust. 
 
From what I understand the recipe has been around for a long time and is regarded as homemade waxoyl. 

 

Lanolin 

"Lanotec" or a recipe on the internet known as "Ed's Red." One of the ingredients that caught my eye was anhydrous lanolin. After more research, I found out that lanolin has been used as a rust preventative for a very long time by mariners and machinists. The thing that attracted me in particular to use of lanolin was that it is a natural product derived from sheep and an ingredient used in various skin creams and products. If it works, it should be particularly good for the lathe and my various hand tools. 
 
I read somewhere (didn't bookmark) that 1 part lanolin can be mixed with 5 parts mineral spirits to be used as a rust preventer. The idea is the mineral spirits thins the solution, evaporates, and leaves behind a coating of lanolin on the metal. 
 
I picked up the bulk anhydrous lanolin from Amazon. One of those plunger type measuring cups made easy work of measuring out 4 fl oz which I then put in a quart paint can. 

 

LPS-3  and Fluid Film are lanolin based spray 

 

To clean it off simply spray WD40 on it. It dissolves immediately and I simply wipe it off. WD40 really removes the hassle factor with Lanolin. 

 

Linseed oil 

If you want to stop steel rusting on surfaces which don't rub up against each other you may want to try linseed oil. I discovered that when I put linseed oil onto the wooden handle of a shovel and some got onto the rusty steel shank that it reacted with the rust to form a dry, black shiny coating which didn't rust any further. It only works when there is a reasonable amount of surface rust already present. If linseed oil is applied to bright steel it goes sticky. 

 

Caterpillar rust preventitive oil sold in one gallon containers available at any Caterpillar dealer. Part # 1U8801. It srays on like a liquid dries to a thick impermiable waxy film 

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1 hour ago, '76Mintgrun'02 said:

Pricy stuff.  Amsoil only wants $9.35

http://www.amsoil.com/shop/by-product/other-products/cleaners-and-protectants/

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Father of three, thank you so much for the home made waxoyl recipe. I've used waxoyl on my cars for years and it works fantastically. It is also kind of expensive, and difficult to find now so this is a great help.

 

Thank you, so very much, sincerely Peter

DSCN7431.JPG

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I used Eastwood's Rust Encapsulator with that nozzle in areas I couldn't get to.

 

http://www.eastwood.com/ew-rust-encapsulator-w-ext-nozzle-black.html

If you go this route, only buy 1 can with a nozzle, buy the other cans without.

 

...also I would also use POR15's Degreaser & Metal Ready to prep before using the Encapsulator...when possible.

 

18580348136_9ef8f73fc6_m.jpg18602211552_260bd8e1d2_m.jpg

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For spraying into blind panels (behind the upholstery panels in doors and rear quarters, into the rear wheel opening lips from inside the trunk,etc) I use a product called "RusFre"  It's available in our area at auto body supply stores, and is very smilar to Waxoyl and/or the stuff Ziebart uses for similar rustproofing.  Not too expensive (cheaper than Waxoyl) and works very well.  Blind panels I did back in the 80s on my '69 are still free of rust.

 

mike

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