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danco_

1969 Florida 1600 and 1972 Green 2002. A little something for everyone.

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Hello Ryan,

 

That is a very clean and unadulterated car. It is also a very cool 60s era color similar to some of the VWs which keeps things on the cool side in the California sun.

 

I don't know who suggested bolting on that 34ich carb on a 1600 or a 2002. That carb is simply too small for the 1600, not to mention the 2002. But, it's been advertised as an "Upgrade" over the stock Solex. The 34ICH really stifles the engine's ability to breath. I did some comparisons with the stock Solex, and there is no comparison. The Solex delivers a lot more power. The 34ICh is designed for something in the 1100cc-1300cc range.

 

After playing around with various exhaust systems, I feel that the pre smog (1967) exhaust manifold works best. The smog exhaust manifold with the injection tubes does not deliver the same flow. You can actually feel the difference. There is also a difference in the exhaust note since the 67 manifold is more free flowing. I have not bolted on any 1600 specific headers to my 1600s because I've had bad experiences with headers on my 2002s. I just feel like too much drivability is sacrificed. I have a 1600 header sitting around which needs minor repair. I'll give it to you (free) if you're in LA at some point. I don't know the manufacturer.

 

On my 1600 I use the 67 exhaust manifold with stock downpipe and  Ansa Sport center muffler or resonator and a stock rear muffler. The Ansa rear muffler is too much; too much noise and some loss in driveability. The stock resonator, though, seems too stifling. So, that is how I came up with this set-up. My, 2 liter, though, likes the stock resonator better.

 

I've ran sideraft Solex PHH40 carbs in the past with mixed success.

 

The first problem is that I used the carbs from an 1800ti. They have the incorrect chokes and jets. So, I had a machinist machine me the correct size chokes, and the jets were easy to obtain since they are just standard Solex jets. However, the carbs were still not to 1600ti spec since there are other differences such as the Solex's version of the emulsion tubes and other minor differences. Either way, the carbs worked, but I could never get a smooth idle below 1,100-1,200 rpms. 

 

I've driven a couple of otherwise stock 1600s with the Alpina spec Weber DCOE 40 carbs, and the cars idled normally and felt good.

You can find Alpina's jetting prescription in one of the Weber tuning books. The chokes and jets are pretty small. Mains are at 110 while the chokes are only 27mm. This is just off the top of my head, and I'll give you Alpina's full jetting prescription when I get home tonight. Glen at 2002AD has an Alpina weber kit along with a 300 degree cam in his otherwise stock 1600 with standard 8.6 / 1 compression pistons, and it seems to work well.

 

The 32/36 did not work well out of the box. I even obtained the correct 2 barrel manifold with 1600 ports. It came off a 3 series 316 1.6 liter. To my surprise this manifold is about 1 inch shorter compared to the stock I barrel manifold or the stock BMW 2002 2 barrel manifold. The car idled really nice, but immediately bogged as soon as the secondary throttle opened-up. It was too lean, so I just kept increasing the fuel jets in both the primary and secondary until the bogging stopped. On the primary throat the main fuel jet had to be at least 145-150, and I don't remember the second throat, but I think it was at about 165. On the primary throat, I brought the air jet down to 155 or 160, and on the secondary throat I had it at about 165 or 170. The stumbling stopped and the car ran great, but I was only getting 17mpg. And, I noticed some black smoke occasionally. I think the 32/36 needs smaller chokes (venturis) to work well with the 1600.

 

In the end I ditched everything in favor of the stock single barrel Solex with a new throttle-shaft / butterfly (The bottom portion of the carb) which I bought online from a seller in Germany.

 

The longneck rear end works well. You can even obtain the specific bushings which are used on the trailing arms for these early subframes. Mobile Traditions makes them and Maximillian has some in stock. The advantage of the longneck is that it has a higher oil capacity, is slightly heavier ( This is exactly where you need a little more weight), and you can take off the joke and change the front seal without having to disassemble the entire diff. The nut tightening the yoke to the longneck does not also torque the crush collar as it does on the shortneck diff. The early 1600 telescopic driveshaft is also nice. There are no u-joints and servicing is really easy.

The 68 2002 also uses the same subframe, but it uses a slightly different driveshaft which is still telescopic, but with servicable u-joints with grease nipples. I think this was the best driveshaft used on any 02, but it probably cost BMW too much money to produce. These 68 and some early 69 2002s had this set-up with the longneck 3.64.

 

I like your wheel idea. If you widen them, go to 6 inches. With the correct offset everything should tuck in under the rear fender with 205/60 x 13s and for sure with the 185s. The fixed negative camber plates will just tuck everything in at the front.

 

Did you ever get a hold of that 1600 motor from Sacramento ? I wonder who got it.

 

Slavs

 

 

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(edited)

Hello Ryan,

 

That is a very clean and unadulterated car. It is also a very cool 60s era color similar to some of the VWs which keeps things on the cool side in the California sun.

 

I don't know who suggested bolting on that 34ich carb on a 1600 or a 2002. That carb is simply too small for the 1600, not to mention the 2002. But, it's been advertised as an "Upgrade" over the stock Solex. The 34ICH really stifles the engine's ability to breath. I did some comparisons with the stock Solex, and there is no comparison. The Solex delivers a lot more power. The 34ICh is designed for something in the 1100cc-1300cc range.

 

After playing around with various exhaust systems, I feel that the pre smog (1967) exhaust manifold works best. The smog exhaust manifold with the injection tubes does not deliver the same flow. You can actually feel the difference. There is also a difference in the exhaust note since the 67 manifold is more free flowing. I have not bolted on any 1600 specific headers to my 1600s because I've had bad experiences with headers on my 2002s. I just feel like too much drivability is sacrificed. I have a 1600 header sitting around which needs minor repair. I'll give it to you (free) if you're in LA at some point. I don't know the manufacturer.

 

On my 1600 I use the 67 exhaust manifold with stock downpipe and  Ansa Sport center muffler or resonator and a stock rear muffler. The Ansa rear muffler is too much; too much noise and some loss in driveability. The stock resonator, though, seems too stifling. So, that is how I came up with this set-up. My, 2 liter, though, likes the stock resonator better.

 

I've ran sideraft Solex PHH40 carbs in the past with mixed success.

 

The first problem is that I used the carbs from an 1800ti. They have the incorrect chokes and jets. So, I had a machinist machine me the correct size chokes, and the jets were easy to obtain since they are just standard Solex jets. However, the carbs were still not to 1600ti spec since there are other differences such as the Solex's version of the emulsion tubes and other minor differences. Either way, the carbs worked, but I could never get a smooth idle below 1,100-1,200 rpms. 

 

I've driven a couple of otherwise stock 1600s with the Alpina spec Weber DCOE 40 carbs, and the cars idled normally and felt good.

You can find Alpina's jetting prescription in one of the Weber tuning books. The chokes and jets are pretty small. Mains are at 110 while the chokes are only 27mm. This is just off the top of my head, and I'll give you Alpina's full jetting prescription when I get home tonight. Glen at 2002AD has an Alpina weber kit along with a 300 degree cam in his otherwise stock 1600 with standard 8.6 / 1 compression pistons, and it seems to work well.

 

The 32/36 did not work well out of the box. I even obtained the correct 2 barrel manifold with 1600 ports. It came off a 3 series 316 1.6 liter. To my surprise this manifold is about 1 inch shorter compared to the stock I barrel manifold or the stock BMW 2002 2 barrel manifold. The car idled really nice, but immediately bogged as soon as the secondary throttle opened-up. It was too lean, so I just kept increasing the fuel jets in both the primary and secondary until the bogging stopped. On the primary throat the main fuel jet had to be at least 145-150, and I don't remember the second throat, but I think it was at about 165. On the primary throat, I brought the air jet down to 155 or 160, and on the secondary throat I had it at about 165 or 170. The stumbling stopped and the car ran great, but I was only getting 17mpg. And, I noticed some black smoke occasionally. I think the 32/36 needs smaller chokes (venturis) to work well with the 1600.

 

In the end I ditched everything in favor of the stock single barrel Solex with a new throttle-shaft / butterfly (The bottom portion of the carb) which I bought online from a seller in Germany.

 

The longneck rear end works well. You can even obtain the specific bushings which are used on the trailing arms for these early subframes. Mobile Traditions makes them and Maximillian has some in stock. The advantage of the longneck is that it has a higher oil capacity, is slightly heavier ( This is exactly where you need a little more weight), and you can take off the joke and change the front seal without having to disassemble the entire diff. The nut tightening the yoke to the longneck does not also torque the crush collar as it does on the shortneck diff. The early 1600 telescopic driveshaft is also nice. There are no u-joints and servicing is really easy.

The 68 2002 also uses the same subframe, but it uses a slightly different driveshaft which is still telescopic, but with servicable u-joints with grease nipples. I think this was the best driveshaft used on any 02, but it probably cost BMW too much money to produce. These 68 and some early 69 2002s had this set-up with the longneck 3.64.

 

I like your wheel idea. If you widen them, go to 6 inches. With the correct offset everything should tuck in under the rear fender with 205/60 x 13s and for sure with the 185s. The fixed negative camber plates will just tuck everything in at the front.

 

Did you ever get a hold of that 1600 motor from Sacramento ? I wonder who got it.

 

Slavs

 

Slavs, first, I thank you very much for the mini essay you just wrote. This was quite the informative read and I reread it three or four times. 

 

I have done my fair share of searching and more often than not, I come across your posts where you are a strong advocate for the single barrel solex. Unfortunately for me, the car was purchased with the Weber 34 ICH. It's not something I wanted, but I have it anyways. The funny thing is that I checked the original motor from the blue car (also a 1.6L M10/188 head), and it too has the 34 ICH carb on it. I don't even possess an original Solex (yet).

 

Ray Koke is helping me acquire a set of sidedraft manifolds for the 118 head. I figure that this would be a good time to tinker with Webers. Now that you mention an Alpina recipe for DCOE 40's, I'm quite curious to know it and replicate it. I will contact Glen at 2002AD and see what he has going on. This will be fun. 

 

For the exhaust, as far as I know, I have a stock exhaust manifold, stock downpipe, and what looks like a modified center piece leading into an Ansa muffler with center exit. I just purchased a brand new full stock 2002 exhaust that I want to make work. If you are serious about the 1600 exhaust manifold, I'd love to take it off your hands and make it work. Is it a stock manifold or something aftermarket?

 

For the rear end, I have both the entire long-neck system and the entire short-neck system. The long neck diff should be 4.11 and the short neck diff should be 4.10 (both open, non-LSD). The only reason I would swap is if I wanted to go to the 5-speed trans, or I wanted to go to the later style driveshaft. I want to keep the 4-speed trans since I have a brand new pressure plate and clutch disk for the 6-bolt flywheel. These parts are NLA if I recall correctly. 

 

I do want to add sway bars and refresh all bushings and possibly have all suspension pieces powdercoated. Just because. This is a car I want to keep for the long haul, so I want to do it right. 

 

 

I'll look into the wheel widening and get that started next week. Tomorrow, the 1972 2002 arrives in Long Beach for assessment. That is a whole other project. 

 

 

 

I wanted that 1600 motor in Sacramento, but timing was all wrong and I ended up having medical issues pertaining to the accident of the last 1600. I lost out big time. That was a good motor. 

Edited by danco_

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Ryan,

 

Yes, parts are a lot easier to locate for the short neck style diff and subframe. And shortneck diffs are more readily available in different ratios, especially the 3.90 ratio that is very popular with the 5 speed overdrive 5 speed. But as far as the driveshaft is concerned, any driveshaft can be shortened and modified to fit the 5 speed overdrive.

 

The 5 speed OD from the 320i is most commonly fitted with the 3 hole 320i yoke. The corresponding driveshaft is also 3 hole. The driveshaft 3 holes + the tranny yoke 3 holes = 6 holes total. Therefore, the 6 hole 320i guibo is the preferred guibo to be used in this conversion vs. the 8 hole guibo from the 2002. The 8 hole guibo is slightly weaker.

 

I've seen the 320i overdrive also outfitted with the 4 hole fine splined yoke. The yokes are interchangeable. You can do the conversion with either yoke. I have a 2 liter and 5 speed 320I OD in my 67 1600 where I've retained the longneck 4.11 diff. But, I did not use 67 driveshaft. I rather used the driveshaft from a 68 2002. It is rated for more torque vs. the 1600 driveshaft. It is also a short driveshaft since the 68 2002 also has a longneck diff, albeit in 3.64 ratio. I had this driveshaft shortened, and during the modification I had them change it from a 4 hole to a 320i 3 hole.

 

The only problem with my set-up is that the only commonly available diff ratio is 4.11 open diff from the 1600 and the less common 3.64 open diff from the 68 and early 2002. In this country, It is nearly impossible the get a hold of this style diff in a 3.90 diff ratio.  But, in Europe they were available in every imaginable diff ratio for racing. There was a German site (Schimmer Tuning) which sold them and all types of rare BMW NOS parts including racing parts. I believe these diffs were preferred because they were heavier and have slightly higher oil capacity for better cooling. These diffs are also easier to service.

 

As far as the exhaust, I have an aftermarket exhaust "Header" for a 1600. This replaces the factory exhaust manifold and down pipe.

I personally prefer the factory set-up from a 67 1600 where there are no air injection tubes in the exhaust manifold. The Neu Klasse 1600, 1800 and 1800ti cars also used this pre-smog manifold. So, if you want to hunt one down you can also look there. The header I mentioned above is aftermarket and needs some minor repair. It is much more free flowing compared to the any version of the factory set-up. You can have it. I don't care so much for "Headers".

 

Jetting prescriptions from a Weber DCOE Tuning manual:

 

BMW 1800 TISA

Number of cylinders: 4
Capacity in cc: 1773
Carburettor type: 45 DCOE 15/16
Number of carburators: 2
Choke sizes: 38
Auxiliary venturi: 5.00
Main jet: 1.25
Idle jet: 0.45 F8
Air idle jet or hole: -
Emulsion tube: F9
Air correction jet: 1.70
Starter jet: 1.40 F5
Accceleration pump jet: 0.40
Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.70
Needle valve: 2.25

 

BMW 1800 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4
Capacity in cc: 1766
Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 86/87
Number of carburators: 2
Choke sizes: 32
Auxiliary venturi: 4.50
Main jet: 1.20
Idle jet: 0.55 F8
Air idle jet or hole: -
Emulsion tube: F9
Air correction jet: 2.10
Starter jet: 0.60 F5
Accceleration pump jet: 0.35
Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.60
Needle valve: 1.75

 

BMW 1600 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4
Capacity in cc: 1573
Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 84/85
Number of carburators: 2
Choke sizes: 27
Auxiliary venturi: 4.50
Main jet: 1.10
Idle jet: 0.50 F8
Air idle jet or hole: -
Emulsion tube: F9
Air correction jet: 2.00
Starter jet: 0.60 F5
Accceleration pump jet: 0.35
Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.70
Needle valve: 1.50

 

BMW 1800 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4
Capacity in cc: 1766
Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 86/87
Number of carburators: 2
Choke sizes: 32
Auxiliary venturi: 4.50
Main jet: 1.20
Idle jet: 0.55 F8
Air idle jet or hole: -
Emulsion tube: F9
Air correction jet: 2.10
Starter jet: 0.60 F5
Accceleration pump jet: 0.35
Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.60
Needle valve: 1.75

 

BMW 2000 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4
Capacity in cc: 1990
Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 88/89
Number of carburators: 2
Choke sizes: 37
Auxiliary venturi: 4.50
Main jet: 1.25
Idle jet: 0.55 F8
Air idle jet or hole: -
Emulsion tube: F16
Air correction jet: 1.70
Starter jet: 0.60 F5
Accceleration pump jet: 0.40
Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.60
Needle valve: 2.00

 

BMW 2002

Number of cylinders: 4
Capacity in cc: 1990
Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 88/89
Number of carburators: 2
Choke sizes: 34
Auxiliary venturi: 5.00
Main jet: 1.30
Idle jet: 0.50 F8
Air idle jet or hole: -
Emulsion tube: F9
Air correction jet: 1.80
Accceleration pump jet: 0.40
Aceelerator pump inlet valve with exhaust office: 0.45
Needle valve: 2.25

 

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Ryan,

 

Yes, parts are a lot easier to locate for the short neck style diff and subframe. And shortneck diffs are more readily available in different ratios, especially the 3.90 ratio that is very popular with the 5 speed overdrive 5 speed. But as far as the driveshaft is concerned, any driveshaft can be shortened and modified to fit the 5 speed overdrive.

 

The 5 speed OD from the 320i is most commonly fitted with the 3 hole 320i yoke. The corresponding driveshaft is also 3 hole. The driveshaft 3 holes + the tranny yoke 3 holes = 6 holes total. Therefore, the 6 hole 320i guibo is the preferred guibo to be used in this conversion vs. the 8 hole guibo from the 2002. The 8 hole guibo is slightly weaker.

 

I've seen the 320i overdrive also outfitted with the 4 hole fine splined yoke. The yokes are interchangeable. You can do the conversion with either yoke. I have a 2 liter and 5 speed 320I OD in my 67 1600 where I've retained the longneck 4.11 diff. But, I did not use 67 driveshaft. I rather used the driveshaft from a 68 2002. It is rated for more torque vs. the 1600 driveshaft. It is also a short driveshaft since the 68 2002 also has a longneck diff, albeit in 3.64 ratio. I had this driveshaft shortened, and during the modification I had them change it from a 4 hole to a 320i 3 hole.

 

The only problem with my set-up is that the only commonly available diff ratio is 4.11 open diff from the 1600 and the less common 3.64 open diff from the 68 and early 2002. In this country, It is nearly impossible the get a hold of this style diff in a 3.90 diff ratio.  But, in Europe they were available in every imaginable diff ratio for racing. There was a German site (Schimmer Tuning) which sold them and all types of rare BMW NOS parts including racing parts. I believe these diffs were preferred because they were heavier and have slightly higher oil capacity for better cooling. These diffs are also easier to service.

 

As far as the exhaust, I have an aftermarket exhaust "Header" for a 1600. This replaces the factory exhaust manifold and down pipe.

I personally prefer the factory set-up from a 67 1600 where there are no air injection tubes in the exhaust manifold. The Neu Klasse 1600, 1800 and 1800ti cars also used this pre-smog manifold. So, if you want to hunt one down you can also look there. The header I mentioned above is aftermarket and needs some minor repair. It is much more free flowing compared to the any version of the factory set-up. You can have it. I don't care so much for "Headers".

 

Jetting prescriptions from a Weber DCOE Tuning manual:

 

BMW 1800 TISA

Number of cylinders: 4

Capacity in cc: 1773

Carburettor type: 45 DCOE 15/16

Number of carburators: 2

Choke sizes: 38

Auxiliary venturi: 5.00

Main jet: 1.25

Idle jet: 0.45 F8

Air idle jet or hole: -

Emulsion tube: F9

Air correction jet: 1.70

Starter jet: 1.40 F5

Accceleration pump jet: 0.40

Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.70

Needle valve: 2.25

 

BMW 1800 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4

Capacity in cc: 1766

Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 86/87

Number of carburators: 2

Choke sizes: 32

Auxiliary venturi: 4.50

Main jet: 1.20

Idle jet: 0.55 F8

Air idle jet or hole: -

Emulsion tube: F9

Air correction jet: 2.10

Starter jet: 0.60 F5

Accceleration pump jet: 0.35

Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.60

Needle valve: 1.75

 

BMW 1600 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4

Capacity in cc: 1573

Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 84/85

Number of carburators: 2

Choke sizes: 27

Auxiliary venturi: 4.50

Main jet: 1.10

Idle jet: 0.50 F8

Air idle jet or hole: -

Emulsion tube: F9

Air correction jet: 2.00

Starter jet: 0.60 F5

Accceleration pump jet: 0.35

Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.70

Needle valve: 1.50

 

BMW 1800 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4

Capacity in cc: 1766

Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 86/87

Number of carburators: 2

Choke sizes: 32

Auxiliary venturi: 4.50

Main jet: 1.20

Idle jet: 0.55 F8

Air idle jet or hole: -

Emulsion tube: F9

Air correction jet: 2.10

Starter jet: 0.60 F5

Accceleration pump jet: 0.35

Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.60

Needle valve: 1.75

 

BMW 2000 Alpina

Number of cylinders: 4

Capacity in cc: 1990

Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 88/89

Number of carburators: 2

Choke sizes: 37

Auxiliary venturi: 4.50

Main jet: 1.25

Idle jet: 0.55 F8

Air idle jet or hole: -

Emulsion tube: F16

Air correction jet: 1.70

Starter jet: 0.60 F5

Accceleration pump jet: 0.40

Aceelerator pump back bleed: 0.60

Needle valve: 2.00

 

BMW 2002

Number of cylinders: 4

Capacity in cc: 1990

Carburettor type: 40 DCOE 88/89

Number of carburators: 2

Choke sizes: 34

Auxiliary venturi: 5.00

Main jet: 1.30

Idle jet: 0.50 F8

Air idle jet or hole: -

Emulsion tube: F9

Air correction jet: 1.80

Accceleration pump jet: 0.40

Aceelerator pump inlet valve with exhaust office: 0.45

Needle valve: 2.25

Thank you for all the information on the jetting.

 

I have a line on a euro, smogless 1600 exhaust manifold right now, and your exhaust header. I prefer to try the header option, with the euro manifold as a back up at this point. 

When would be a good time to swing by and pick this up? Is there anything you need that is 1600-related? I have quite a few accumulated parts from my past 1600, that can be viewed here:   http://www.bmw2002faq.com/topic/151207-just-in-time-for-summer-1971-bmw-1600/

 

I even have an open 4.10 diff from this same 1600 (short neck from a 1971 car). I know the racecar guys like to weld these up and use them. Just an offer I thought I'd extend your way for your help. 

 

 

Thank you very much for the Weber prescription. I will use this soon. Things are coming together. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On a side note, this car came home today.  I posted a photo of it earlier while in SF, but it is currently in Long Beach at a buddy's warehouse. 

 

The guy who moved it owns a small transport company. He moves cars from norcal to socal for $300 per car. Very good price. He's known around the 2002 and coupe guys. I can give his information should anyone request it. 

 

 

 

 Big thanks to Kronus of R3vlimited for facilitating the deal on my behalf. He's a really nice guy. 

 
Time to do stuff to this one too.
 
VAQhHhd.jpg?1

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I have wanted to do this for a while, so I finally started on it today. I took an m10 valve cover from a later m10 (probably e30) and deleted some of the aluminum accents on top. It reminds me of the early m10 valve covers, which I much prefer. I still need to finish it, but I'll likely crinkle coat it black, like my last valve cover was. It will help hid some of the grinding marks I put into it. 

 

 

xsxHXJ1.jpg?1

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I cleaned up some stuff and nearly finished the new carpet install. Thanks Esty.

 

 

PATINA SO HARD RIGHT NOW

lSE2Zsk.jpg?2

 

 

 

and some interior:

hArbGqO.jpg?1

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am down to an old Iphone 5 with a broken camera lens, since my DSLR got destroyed in the blue car's accident. I think I'm going to buy a new Sony A7r II, but I'm going to wait for the new iphone that should come out in the next month and a half. Until then, I'm going to be posting the worst photos ever.

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This valve cover is almost complete. I already screwed it up around the emblem, but I don't think I want to redo it. It will bug me every time I see it, but this isn't a perfect car. If you see the car in person and point out this specific imperfection, I will delete you from all my social media accounts. I don't need you pointing out my flaws.

 

Call the cops, IDGAF.

 

 

jNgSanL.jpg?1

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I think it looks great.

Wabi-sabi (侘?) represents a comprehensive Japanese world view or aesthetic centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. The aesthetic is sometimes described as one of beauty that is "imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete"."wabi-sabi nurtures all that is authentic by acknowledging three simple realities: nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect."

Wabi connotes rustic simplicity, freshness or quietness, and can be applied to both natural and human-made objects, or understated elegance. It can also refer to quirks and anomalies arising from the process of construction, which add uniqueness and elegance to the object. Sabi is beauty or serenity that comes with age, when the life of the object and its impermanence are evidenced in its patina and wear, or in any visible repairs.

Chris.

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I put the final carpet piece in. This is what the interior looks like so far. Hard to tell, but the front seat vinyl looks a bit lighter than the door cards. 

 

PIdxwaC.jpg?1

 

 

 

 

 

And I also ordered this California Legacy Plate for the Florida Green 1600:

 

zu2oEXQ.jpg?1

 

 

Still not sure if it was a good idea, but it's mine now. I've never had a legacy/vanity plate before. 

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The SF car goes in for bodywork on Monday, so today's agenda included removing the front bumper, pulling the damaged part of the nose out a bit more (for tire clearance), and washing the engine bay. 

 

I managed to remove the bent bumper, but when I was undoing a bolt, I was unaware of how much stress the bumper was under. Just as the bolt was being removed, the bumper swung and punch me right above the left eye. The pain was so intense and I thought for sure I was bleeding. It reminded me of the time I was hit in the head with a copper pipe by my brother. We were probably 9-10 at the time and we were swatting bees but one of those swings caught me straight in the head. I thought for sure I was never going to recover from that one.

 

But the bumper is off, I pulled the fender and nose out a little more. Before the pulling, I wasn't able to utilize the full turning radius because the wheel was coming into contact with part of the nose that was pushed in. I fixed it now and have the clearance I need. I drove the car around for the first time and it was sublime. Driving a completely stock 2002 is something really special. Too bad I hot-rod nearly every car I've ever owned. I don't think this one will be an exception.

 

rEtSsPs.jpg?1

 

And I also steam cleaned the engine bay a little bit. Here is a sneak peak after I already cleaned part of the valve cover. The engine bay is much cleaner now. 

 

KlSHrii.jpg?1

 

 

 

 

And here is a photo of the back seat area. Nothing to see but here it is anyways.

 

nM2vsHw.jpg?1

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