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How is this linkage to Kpump bracket held on?


Go to solution Solved by OldRoller,

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Part No8 has an internal spring clip, it just pushes on to the ball protruding from the pump lever. Can't clearly see in you picture...has the linkage popped-off the ball or has the ball stayed in the linkage but separated from the pump lever?

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'59 Morris Minor, '67 Triumph TR4A, '68 Silver Shadow, '72 2002tii, '73 Jaguar E-Type,

'73 2002tii w/Alpina mods , '74 2002turbo, '85 Alfa Spider, '03 Lotus Elise

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The ball part is pressed into the lever and peened on the backside. The best way I've found to reattach that is to spot weld it in position from the back, I don't know if you can get a new lever or not. 

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If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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4 minutes ago, dlacey said:

Part No8 has an internal spring clip, it just pushes on to the ball protruding from the pump lever. Can't clearly see in you picture...has the linkage popped-off the ball or has the ball stayed in the linkage but separated from the pump lever?

That a good question. All I see is a little bolt short looking rod  protruding from ball and it’s separated from pump lever. Tried to push it back on, but it just comes off

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17 minutes ago, e31fan said:

Tried to push it back on, but it just comes off

Oooh, that is not easy to fix... the exact positioning of that ball in the lever is critical to the synchronisation of KF pump to throttle butterfly (air-fuel ratio). To remove that lever from the pump is a big job that is a total pump removal and strip down...see that lever at 5:40 in this video: https://youtu.be/eSBJh4nxETg 

 

If it were my 'daily driver' i would likely just push the ball back in the hole  & secure it  it with a blob of MIG welded kluge.

Or, buy a new ball with a threaded base and bolt on a replacement with threadlock:

WWW.EBAY.CO.UK

Outer Thread: M6 x 1.00mm. Inner Thread: M6 x 1.00mm. Renault Trucks. Volvo Trucks. Sampa 096.2224. PE Automotive 140.068-00A. Lemforder 22256 01. DT Spare Parts 9.05306.

 

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'59 Morris Minor, '67 Triumph TR4A, '68 Silver Shadow, '72 2002tii, '73 Jaguar E-Type,

'73 2002tii w/Alpina mods , '74 2002turbo, '85 Alfa Spider, '03 Lotus Elise

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  • Solution

Clean the ball stud and lever with carb cleaner, mix a small batch of JB Weld and reinstall. Leave for 24 hours. 

Repaired an old Merc diesel in a boat that way, lasted until the engine was replaced many years later.

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"Sometimes it's a little better to travel than to arrive”  Robert M. Pirsig

Gunther March 19, 1974. Hoffman Motors march 22 1974 NYC

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Micro surgery performed, ball is now back on Kpump bracket. Coated bracket and ball with JB and accidentally dropped it down the motor, panic ensued. Found it, thank god for my trusty extendable magnet, cleaned it up and reattached. Good thick coat of JB Weld all around.  Now wait 24 hours and hope for the best. I’d honestly be shocked if it didn’t hold. Brake cleaner, dried for hours, then scuffed up the metal on both parts before the JB weld. Cross your fingers for me!! 🤞

IMG_0164.png

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