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ignition points


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2 minutes ago, 2002iii said:

You can also use points from VW's and Alfa Romeo's of the same Era. They all used Bosch distributors.

 

While there is some overlap,  there are also situations which require specific points, depending on the distributor model. 

 

Cars that are fifty + years old may not have the original distributor, so it's better to give the distributor model when asking for parts that will fit. 

 

This thread is half of a double-post that Fred made.  Tom (Visionaut) gave a link to points which will fit the stock 1600 cast iron distributor in the other thread and it lists other makes that also make use of the same points. 

 

 

 

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Not a fan of Bosch points.The rubbing block is suspect. My preference is Standard Motor Products points or house brand from Napa. I have had success with both of these brands.

'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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The rubbing block is a small right angle piece of phenolic and it breaks right at the  angle. This has happened to me twice and friends as well. I can't speak to quality of vintage Bosch points but the ones made now are junk. The other brands I mentioned are good quality points. I especially like the SMP ones. Just take a look at them it's a far superior product and I have never had issues with them. I run them in my VWs with CDI ignition and haven't had to change in five years.

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'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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I read that there was a problem with the plastic rubbing blocks on Bosch points years ago, but was under the impression that it had been taken care of.  I also ran them on old VWs and on my 2002 for the past 12 years.  I think people tend to put new points in sooner than necessary, since it's easy to do and they're cheap enough; but I've used the same sets of points for years on end without ever having a problem with the rubbing block.

 

I'm not trying to discredit your experience.  Thank you for sharing your recommendation.

 

Quality control does seem to have gone to sh!t on a lot of Bosch (and other) parts.  It is possible to find new old stock on eBay, but that's not nearly as convenient as sourcing new parts that still maintain quality.

 

I went to Rock Auto and dug up some images of the SMP points for the OP's '68 1600 and for my '76, just for fun.  

 

For the 1600, RA gives the Bosch distributor number along with the SMP points.

GB4480P for distributor 0231116051 

image.png.fcc7185f1edfa9e72ce4ff63c029380e.png

 

They list another distributor option for the '68 1600 (0231115045), but they don't have SMP points to fit.  The points that would fit that one are out of stock.  (I'm familiar with the 045 unit, but not the 051).

 

Here are the SMP points that would fit my late model distributor.

 

image.png.c072cd0d091448ddbc61c85e7706d0f0.png image.png.f59989f05766de0c115232133b90bd2d.png

 

I see what you're saying about the sturdy design of the rubbing block and the contact surface looks taller too, which seems like a good thing.  I tend to think of plastic parts as low quality, when compared to metal, but understand that's an irrational bias in some cases.

 

The rubbing blocks on Bosch points I've used have either plastic or phenolic rubbing blocks.  I've always preferred phenolic, (based on the bias mentioned above).  When ordering points, I always look at the rubbing block in the image and go for the brown phenolic blocks, instead of the white plastic ones; but the last time I ordered some, I learned that Bosch is now making the plastic part brown, to mimic phenolic!  I thought that was a dirty trick.

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