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Door panel clip part number and early shifter question


Pablo M

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1972 2002tii

First, the door panel clips-what is the part number of the hat shaped bit that is in the door, that accepts the clip? 

In the below poor diagram item #3 is the typical green clip that attaches to the door panel. #2 is the receiver, but there's no part number for that and I need a few. 

 

image.png.94d127223183d3028bf2f5955a6402a6.png

 

 

Second, early 4 speed shifter. Shifting into next county is what it feels like. Now, cars been neglected a bit so the bushings and such are f'd up. In fact the bushings at the bottom of the shift lever are completely missing. What I want, in a perfect world, is a nice crisp short shift. Ive done some racing and have always had sports cars, so that's kinda my benchmark. 

What are my best options?

I've researched here and the IE late shifter upgrade seems to have some issues, and I've been told by friends its not a huge improvement 'upgrading' to the later shifter. I've also read here that just rebuilding the stock shifter is a good improvement. A 5-speed is not in the cards anytime soon. What do you all think?

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

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4 hours ago, Pablo M said:

1972 2002tii

First, the door panel clips-what is the part number of the hat shaped bit that is in the door, that accepts the clip? 

In the below poor diagram item #3 is the typical green clip that attaches to the door panel. #2 is the receiver, but there's no part number for that and I need a few. 

 

image.png.94d127223183d3028bf2f5955a6402a6.png

 

 

Second, early 4 speed shifter. Shifting into next county is what it feels like. Now, cars been neglected a bit so the bushings and such are f'd up. In fact the bushings at the bottom of the shift lever are completely missing. What I want, in a perfect world, is a nice crisp short shift. Ive done some racing and have always had sports cars, so that's kinda my benchmark. 

What are my best options?

I've researched here and the IE late shifter upgrade seems to have some issues, and I've been told by friends its not a huge improvement 'upgrading' to the later shifter. I've also read here that just rebuilding the stock shifter is a good improvement. A 5-speed is not in the cards anytime soon. What do you all think?

My recommendation for a new shifter is the DSSR assembly from @BLUNT.  You can use it with a 4 speed transmission then later swap the “dog bone” piece if you decide to change to a 5 speed overdrive tranny.  The shift tower supports are also a crucial element with regards to shifter stability.  Stock pieces are fine. AKG Motorsports sells upgraded pieces.

 

m6c1fmedo4fbc3tb7sfo.jpg
WWW.BLUNTTECH.COM

Our DSSR Short shift kit for 4 speed cars eliminates extra slop while still maintaining serviceability with easily available factory parts.

 

Edited by jgerock

Jim Gerock

 

Riviera 69 2002 built 5/30/69 "Oscar"

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Walloth Nesch sells the door clip sleeves:

 

51131400031.jpg
WWW.WALLOTHNESCH.COM

Door clip sleeve - set of 10 pieces (closed version - prevents the inner door panel (door card) from water) - fits for all models.

 

 

Karl B.

1974 2002tii Malaga ("Conrad") -->> Conrad's Restoration Blog

2003 330i ZHP 6-spd

2011 328i xDrive

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In regards to your shifter…

 

1) the kit Jim linked above is no different than one of IE’s kits.  The idea being you run the later 2002 hardware and a later bmw shift lever.  Toby and I like to verbally chastise each other on our differing opinions on early vs. late shift hardware.

 

2) Given your race car bench mark…. it won’t happen in a street2002. You can improve a sloppy 2002 shifter with kit(s) like the one above (also recommend replacing the two shift plate mounts and support rod bushing) and get maybe %50 towards your benchmark.  It’ll never feel like an s2000 though.

 

3) You can go with a tunnel mounted shifter like AKG or bimmerworld, but while the shift lever itself will be planted feeling, you’ll need urethane motor/trans mounts to similarly stiffen the drivetrain.

 

In short, there’s no golden bullet.  Your friend may be well-meaning, but given your benchmark, perhaps it’s not the best advice.

 

—— 

 

On the panels, yes on later green clips.

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1 hour ago, BLUNT said:

Just use the later green clips. They dont require the receivers      

no-image-available.png
WWW.BLUNTTECH.COM

Green door card clips. Redesigned so you no longer need the female receptacle

 

What? I’m using the green ones already and installed them in the existing rubber receivers. Couple were missing so I wanted to complete them. You’re telling me the green clips don’t even need them?! Good to know. 
Thanks. 

  • Haha 1

2003 e39 M5 (daily)

1986 e30 325es (sons car)

1972 2002tii (fun daily alternative)

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I have one of each style shift link on my 69 and 73, and honestly can't tell much difference in terms of tightness, so long as both have unworn parts. 

 

For a tight shift pattern, the early style "fork and blade" shift linkage is dependent on unworn washers, clevis pin and the hat-shaped spacers that go through the holes on the fork.  Those spacers are plastic and wear pretty quickly.  I've seen 'em replaced with brass or bronze spacers, but that allows noise/vibration that the plastic ones damp out.  Dunno if anyone makes urethane replacements, but that would seem to be the answer.  The clevis pin can wear also, so examine it carefully for wear.  

 

The other component that will cause sloppy shifting is the shifter "tower" (bracket) that bolts to the tranny and supports the shift linkage.  It's fastened to the trans housing with Metalastic joints, rubber bonded to metal.  The rubber turns to black goo over the years, and allows the bracket to become very loose on the tranny.  That translates to a sloppy shifter too.  Those joints can be replaced without dropping the tranny or driveshaft, but it requires some dexterity, ratchet driver extensions and u-joints to achieve.  

 

Even the rubber bushings that separate the outer (chrome/black) shift lever from the inner ones have a bearing on shift sloppiness.  Worn bushings will allow excessive movement between inner and outer shift levers, contributing to sloppiness...

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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