Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

More holes...(rust)


2002VT

Recommended Posts

Anyone ever deal with holes like this before?  I can see right into the cabin. ? I've looked at some replacement panels, but it seems it is not a panel. 

 

 

IMG_8544.JPG

IMG_8545.JPG

Edited by 2002VT
Typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's pretty bad but others have done worse. Depends upon your skills, budget etc etc. How far are you into the car? How much money do you have in it?

 

The pillar and the horizontal inner wing reinforcement are available. I think you will need to make patch panels for the actual holes. Strip it back to solid steel, find the full extent of the holes. 

 

Not to make ale you feel bad but here's pictures of my inner wing so you can see what you are looking at. 

 

IMAG0213.thumb.jpg.e3a8e67302d5b4250b2a58da2e94f2a8.jpgIMAG0214.thumb.jpg.6ea7b8f68ffc705239fab8a345779c35.jpg

rtheriaque wrote:

Carbs: They're necessary and barely controlled fuel leaks that sometimes match the air passing through them.

My build blog:http://www.bmw2002faq.com/blog/163-simeons-blog/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oof.  That's the difficult rust repair you have there.  It CAN be fixed.  Carefully.

On the up side, it doesn't have to be pretty, just strong.

 

How's your welding?

 

t

 

Miller_Millermatic_140_MIG.jpg

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the responses everyone!  Those pics of the car all fixed up gives me renewed hope. When I took the fenders off I took a step back with disappointment. Other rust seems minimal for a new endgland car.  Front outside corner of the floors pans are gone (supports are ok) and there is rust where the rear suspension attaches to the body. The rear drivers shock tower has a small bit, but not bad. I whacked at these spot just to test. 

 

The good news is I have very little into the car. I paid $1.00 for it. I bought some wheels and a brake fluid cap. I bought the wheels are for inspiration.  

 

My welding skills are amazing - in my dreams. The truth is I've never done it - but I am not afraid to learn, just maybe not on structural components. 

 

Im pretty happy there are so many pieces online as far as replacement sheet metal. I just wish I didn't have to use any. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Be careful welding around that plastic hose--it's the front drain for the sunroof, and if you melt or otherwise damage it, it's a bitch to replace.  My '69 had rust in the same place (30 Ohio winters) and I welded in several small patches to preserve that compound curve (no patches were available back in the 1980s).  

 

I'd be much more concerned about rust where the rear subframe attaches to the body.  Repairs there are critical, unless you don't mind the rear subframe parting company with the car--at an inopportune moment.  And while you're at it, examine the rear subframe itself for structural rust.  Whang it with a hammer; if the hammer goes through, you need a new subframe!

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, 2002VT said:

The good news is I have very little into the car. I paid $1.00 for it. I bought some wheels and a brake fluid cap. I bought the wheels are for inspiration.  

 

My welding skills are amazing - in my dreams. The truth is I've never done it - but I am not afraid to learn, just maybe not on structural components. 

 

Im pretty happy there are so many pieces online as far as replacement sheet metal. I just wish I didn't have to use any. 

 

 

 

If you have a work space and tools or chance to invest go ahead. You don't have much to loose. Structural places are actually good to practice because they're not that visible and the metal is thicker (some places) so it's easier to weld. There's many good project blogs to see how it's done. If you don't have a good place to tinker with it then I'd say don't pour any more money into that one.

Racing is Life - everything before and after is just waiting!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This weekend I'll go hammer the actual subframe. If that looks ok (man I hope it does) I'll go buy a Lincoln welder. 

 

Ive watched so much how to weld on YouTube, but part if me is worried about it. I just don't want to screw up. I did work in a body shop for over a year as a high school kid, but never welded or used a plasma cutter.  I know the basics, sanding, filler, and paint. 

 

Part of me also likes the idea of doing this myself. I feel like it's a great life project. Man - it's hard to not grit my teeth on this, guys. 

 

Josh

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...