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Turbo Talk...


JohnC

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I'm doing some planning/investigating for my next project, a turbo conversion. I've been reading everyone's turbo posts. Most are using a Garrett "T3" Turbo. On the Garrett website, they've got three tutorials on turbos, and they have quite an extensive product line. I went through the calculations to determine the appropriate turbo for my objectives, and I come up with the GT2554R as optimal. I'm looking for a modest 200 HP, with minimal turbo lag. Plotting the pressure ratio and corrected airflow on the chart for this turbo indicates that this is a good choice.

Question: What is the difference between this and commonly used T3? I don't see the T3 designation on the Garret website? Is a T3 a general designation? Given that Garrett has so many different products with varying characteristics, I'm wondering if T3s are not all alike.

Will the GTR2554R fit the "T3" flange, such as the one on the Boost Bros header?

John Capoccia

Sierra Madre, CA

 

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I'm going to be using the GT2560R which I think is a better match for lower boost levels. That GT2554R looks pretty small. One of the reasons I used the GT2560R is that they come on Nissan Silvia's which are plentiful here.

The GT2X series use a T25 inlet flange which is NOT the same as the T3. You can get either turbo new from ATP Turbo with a T3 option. That's a lot more expensive than going second hand though.

The Nissan Skyline RB25 engined cars had a T3 flanged turbo which is about the size of the GT2554R (roughly), although it has a ceramic turbine wheel, I think, so bad for >12psi.

I am not sure what is appropriately sized and readily available in the USA, in a T3 flange.

2002tii race car

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I'm going to be using the GT2560R which I think is a better match for lower boost levels. That GT2554R looks pretty small. One of the reasons I used the GT2560R is that they come on Nissan Silvia's which are plentiful here.

The GT2X series use a T25 inlet flange which is NOT the same as the T3. You can get either turbo new from ATP Turbo with a T3 option. That's a lot more expensive than going second hand though.

The Nissan Skyline RB25 engined cars had a T3 flanged turbo which is about the size of the GT2554R (roughly), although it has a ceramic turbine wheel, I think, so bad for >12psi.

I am not sure what is appropriately sized and readily available in the USA, in a T3 flange.

Pretty much anything CamB says on here i agree with. His choice of turbo is pretty spot on and bang for buck you cant beat it (in this part of the world anyway). It really just depends what you want out of the car. Ive gone for a Garrett GT2860RS with the smaller housing which is supposed to be a very quick spooling turbo on a 2L motor but id imagine that Cam's turbo will still start a smidge earlier.

Anyway, +1 for what Cam said. I dont know why all these M10 mani's are a T3 flange. Both Cam and myself are putting/have put on T2 flanges.

6780296635_13fa58faa3_b.jpg

72tii - Whitey

74 - Blacky

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...a modest 200 HP...

oh... is that all...

heh.

Sounds like an E21 engine would make a good baseline-

low enough compression to take a full bar of boost.

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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John,

I been looking at a turbo application for some of the same reasons Cam and Tom refer to, availability and cost. I drove a 98 VW Passet with the K03 turbo for 275K. During the last part of my ownership the turbo failed and I purchased a new K03 which I never installed before the car was sold (availability). I couldn't return the turbo because I had kept it for too long (cost already suffered), SOOOO, I have a new K03 turbo, oil lines, and gaskets that I keep looking at with interest.

I have developed a drawing for a manifold and collected all the parts to build it. At this point I haven't started the fabrication of the manifold because I have been working on my suspension. The K03 mounts using bolts that go through the manifold into tapped holes. This make it a really tight little package as my manifold is going to use a lower/bottom turbo mounting configuration similar to the original 74 but set back a little to allow for inlet and discharge plumbing to the compressor side.

Here's the big rub..... I'm not even sure this application will work. I'm not looking for a ground pounder just some increase in HP based on a standard configuration. I realize I'll need FI to use the turbo.

My intention is to develop an engine capable of getting 30+ mpg with good performance.

Any application info would be appreciated.

I'd be happy to send the anyone the cad file of my manifold design for your review.

Todd

"Common sense isn't common"

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I chose to go for a TD04, standard subaru impreza turbo.

Should have hardly any lag. I'm hoping for 150 - 200hp, otherwise a TD05 fits on the same exhaust mount.

Best point is, they are easy to find and not very expensive.

I also have an extra TD04 that I plan to use, haven't looked into getting flanges for it or what my manifold will look like, but I haven't liked the positioning of the BB manifold, it looks like it mounts the snail really high and far forward.

73 2002 5spd, Megasquirt

02 Subaru WRX wrb wagon

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the T3 turbo refer to a very common series of turbo used for a long period of time on several different car, that means it can be found for very cheap used, rebuild or in scrap yards, thus the "why all manifold are T3 flanged"...

translation: availability.

this turbo is also a prooven one, it is antique, surely not as efficient as todays standard, but is rock solid.

2006 530xi, 1974 2002 Automatic summer DD
1985 XR4TI, 22psi ±300hp
1986 yota pick-up, 2006 Smart FT diesel

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John,

I been looking at a turbo application for some of the same reasons Cam and Tom refer to, availability and cost. I drove a 98 VW Passet with the K03 turbo for 275K. During the last part of my ownership the turbo failed and I purchased a new K03 which I never installed before the car was sold (availability). I couldn't return the turbo because I had kept it for too long (cost already suffered), SOOOO, I have a new K03 turbo, oil lines, and gaskets that I keep looking at with interest.

I have developed a drawing for a manifold and collected all the parts to build it. At this point I haven't started the fabrication of the manifold because I have been working on my suspension. The K03 mounts using bolts that go through the manifold into tapped holes. This make it a really tight little package as my manifold is going to use a lower/bottom turbo mounting configuration similar to the original 74 but set back a little to allow for inlet and discharge plumbing to the compressor side.

Here's the big rub..... I'm not even sure this application will work. I'm not looking for a ground pounder just some increase in HP based on a standard configuration. I realize I'll need FI to use the turbo.

My intention is to develop an engine capable of getting 30+ mpg with good performance.

Any application info would be appreciated.

I'd be happy to send the anyone the cad file of my manifold design for your review.

Todd

imho the to3 would be way too small of a turbo for a m10, it'll spool right off the bottom but really fall flat on its face in the high revs, as well as build up alot of heat, a to4 however would probably be a good match

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John,

I been looking at a turbo application for some of the same reasons Cam and Tom refer to, availability and cost. I drove a 98 VW Passet with the K03 turbo for 275K. During the last part of my ownership the turbo failed and I purchased a new K03 which I never installed before the car was sold (availability). I couldn't return the turbo because I had kept it for too long (cost already suffered), SOOOO, I have a new K03 turbo, oil lines, and gaskets that I keep looking at with interest.

I have developed a drawing for a manifold and collected all the parts to build it. At this point I haven't started the fabrication of the manifold because I have been working on my suspension. The K03 mounts using bolts that go through the manifold into tapped holes. This make it a really tight little package as my manifold is going to use a lower/bottom turbo mounting configuration similar to the original 74 but set back a little to allow for inlet and discharge plumbing to the compressor side.

Here's the big rub..... I'm not even sure this application will work. I'm not looking for a ground pounder just some increase in HP based on a standard configuration. I realize I'll need FI to use the turbo.

My intention is to develop an engine capable of getting 30+ mpg with good performance.

Any application info would be appreciated.

I'd be happy to send the anyone the cad file of my manifold design for your review.

Todd

imho the to3 would be way too small of a turbo for a m10, it'll spool right off the bottom but really fall flat on its face in the high revs, as well as build up alot of heat, a to4 however would probably be a good match

i dont agree, the T3 series can have different a/r to fullfill different engine size/cfm requirements. it is not a "single" part/piece that you can refer to be to small or too large, it is a turbo serie.

It is fitted on a lot of different oem engines ranging up from 1,6L to 2,3L iirc. Just put the correct a/r on both sides and it is more than enough to make a nice turbo set-up. It depends on the taste, ie, lag or no lag versus top end power or flat power band.

it is just perfect for a street driven 02. No race intended, just more oomph and fun.

2006 530xi, 1974 2002 Automatic summer DD
1985 XR4TI, 22psi ±300hp
1986 yota pick-up, 2006 Smart FT diesel

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Guest Anonymous
John,

I been looking at a turbo application for some of the same reasons Cam and Tom refer to, availability and cost. I drove a 98 VW Passet with the K03 turbo for 275K. During the last part of my ownership the turbo failed and I purchased a new K03 which I never installed before the car was sold (availability). I couldn't return the turbo because I had kept it for too long (cost already suffered), SOOOO, I have a new K03 turbo, oil lines, and gaskets that I keep looking at with interest.

I have developed a drawing for a manifold and collected all the parts to build it. At this point I haven't started the fabrication of the manifold because I have been working on my suspension. The K03 mounts using bolts that go through the manifold into tapped holes. This make it a really tight little package as my manifold is going to use a lower/bottom turbo mounting configuration similar to the original 74 but set back a little to allow for inlet and discharge plumbing to the compressor side.

Here's the big rub..... I'm not even sure this application will work. I'm not looking for a ground pounder just some increase in HP based on a standard configuration. I realize I'll need FI to use the turbo.

My intention is to develop an engine capable of getting 30+ mpg with good performance.

Any application info would be appreciated.

I'd be happy to send the anyone the cad file of my manifold design for your review.

Todd

imho the to3 would be way too small of a turbo for a m10, it'll spool right off the bottom but really fall flat on its face in the high revs, as well as build up alot of heat, a to4 however would probably be a good match

i dont agree, the T3 series can have different a/r to fullfill different engine size/cfm requirements. it is not a "single" part/piece that you can refer to be to small or too large, it is a turbo serie.

It is fitted on a lot of different oem engines ranging up from 1,6L to 2,3L iirc. Just put the correct a/r on both sides and it is more than enough to make a nice turbo set-up. It depends on the taste, ie, lag or no lag versus top end power or flat power band.

it is just perfect for a street driven 02. No race intended, just more oomph and fun.

im sorry brain fart i meant ko3 and ko4 turbos. im personaly running a t3 on my car

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