Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

blowing head gaskets


boldtu

Recommended Posts

IO spoke with a BMW mechanic yesterday and he told me that the 2000 cc engine has head gasket problems, they blow them, when I asked him if there was a way to prevent this he didn't know of a way. does anyone know anything about this. Is that a problem with the s14 motor or had they solved that problem by then?

chester

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's not allowed to overheat. My '73's finally blew at 203,922 miles and 33 years on the original gasket, so I can't complain.

Blown gaskets, regardless of the car (esp with iron block and aluminum head) are usually the result of

1. overheating

2. previous problem resulting in an unrepaired, warped head being re-fitted

3. cheap-ass gasket

4. real high compression ratio (stock is 8-9.5:1 depending on model)

5. corrosion around exhaust port water passages from not changing coolant often enough or using the wrong stuff.

Some may disagree, but the M10 doesn't have a head gasket problem in general...

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IO spoke with a BMW mechanic yesterday and he told me that the 2000 cc engine has head gasket problems, they blow them, when I asked him if there was a way to prevent this he didn't know of a way. does anyone know anything about this. Is that a problem with the s14 motor or had they solved that problem by then?

I think this is a blanket statement that doesn't really take into account the conditions under which these failures occur. An original gasket failing after 35+ years of being on the car is pretty damned good service record in my opinion. The number of ways the previous owners of our cars have tortured them is probably too numerous to list. Overheating (as stated before) is probably the biggest problem, and if you live in California (or other warm states) and are in stop and go traffic, if you're not watching the temp, you're probably going to have to pull that head sooner or later. If the work is done right though, you keep an eye on the temp gauge, and you're an average driver, I don't see any reason why a head gasket shouldn't last another 35+years.

It probably goes without saying that doesn't matter if it's a 2002, or a brand new Prius, if you don't pay attention to the temp gauge, and you overheat the car and continue to drive, you're going to be pulling that head, or worse, the whole engine.

-=Scott=-

My Short Bus

rotate.php

1971 2002 - "William Grover-Williams" - Track/Weekend Car VIN 2579197

1998 740iL E38 - "Blau" - Daily Driver

http://gallery.xfiler.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i run a lot of boost on a stock head gasket.

they do NOT blow like your mech. said, pretty lousy statement.

check for:

-pre-ignition or pinging (timing, carbon build-up, improper octane, carb settings,..)

-proper mating surfaces (straight and proper surface rms)

-proper torquing of the head bolts.

2006 530xi, 1974 2002 Automatic summer DD
1985 XR4TI, 22psi ±300hp
1986 yota pick-up, 2006 Smart FT diesel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks a lot, that makes sense. is there an enlarged radiator that you know of that would help this problem? thanks again for the quick response.

Yes and no. For me, I have an Ireland Engineering radiator, and if I'm in the car on a very hot day where it's horrible stop and go traffic, even this oversized radiator doesn't help. I think it's a great radiator, but if I'm riding in hot air, and I have the hot air off the car in front of me going into my radiator, it doesn't help. I think this is going to greatly depend on the car configuration (I'm running dual Weber 45's tuned for max HP, not street driving) as well as the region of the country you live in. It gets into the 90's here in the summer very regularly, and sometimes will creep into the 100's. Your mileage may vary. Hope that helps.

-=Scott=-

My Short Bus

rotate.php

1971 2002 - "William Grover-Williams" - Track/Weekend Car VIN 2579197

1998 740iL E38 - "Blau" - Daily Driver

http://gallery.xfiler.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

Maybe your BMW mechanic is on to something. Maybe the 2 liter engines are prone to headgasket failure when HE works on them. Since he raised the issue, could you please ask him what he bases his opinion on? Does he reuse the headgaskets? Make his own? I doubt he ever heard of the Tii gaskets with the cutting rings. (Search the archives)

Certainly the combination of an aluminum alloy head and cast iron block lend themselves to headgasket failure - if overheated. But I have found the engine will need a valve job usually before any headgasket gives up.

Search the archives. See if anyone else questions premature headgasket failure.

hth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The conditions any engine has to endure can lead to head gasket failure. My parents 81 VW Diesel Rabbit had a bad head gasket at about 50K miles- the VW dealer blamed it on the head bolts. Many 6 cylinder Ford engines have had head gasket issues. Even newer V8 engines can have failures.

Another factor is how the engine was originally designed and altered thru the life cycle of the product line. As racing history has proven, the BMW M10 design is tough enough to withstand high HP applications - the external cooling seems to be the weakpoint.

When "rebuilding" any engine, one must be careful to check tolerances and purchase the best replacement parts available. Anyone can rebuild an engine - the experienced builder can assemble one that will last.

Jim Gerock

 

Riviera 69 2002 built 5/30/69 "Oscar"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...