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Door brake bushings?


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Do they make bushings that fit into the arm of the door brakes? I am working on the pans but decided to back up a step and replace the broken stock door brakes. So I bought the ones that look like smaller versions of the MB ones.Anyway two issues-one is the door swings too wide open-I'm either going to cut the arm and remove a length or drill from the sides and run in some screws as linit stop. Thats first issue. Second issue is that the pin is a little sloppy in the door brake arm which causes it to pop or snap when opening or closing the door.If a busing is not available I fill fill the hole with JB Weld and drill it to a better fit.If you watch the piece closely when the door is opening or closing you can see that it pulls at certain paoints causing the loose fitting to snap or better stated to make noise I dont care for.

'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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I  got some 3/8" plastic and made a spacer to go between the door brake and the body where it mounts inside the door. That limited  the amount of travel as you say, it is too much without them      I use a small allen head bolt (4mm ) with a lock nut on it and use plastic tubing as a buffer inside the door brake end     Without the plastic tubing, it cracks quite loud every time the door opens or closes

 

Thanks, Rick

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10 minutes ago, stephers said:

I  got some 3/8" plastic and made a spacer to go between the door brake and the body where it mounts inside the door. That limited  the amount of travel as you say, it is too much without them      I use a small allen head bolt (4mm ) with a lock nut on it and use plastic tubing as a buffer inside the door brake end     Without the plastic tubing, it cracks quite loud every time the door opens or closes

 

Thanks, Rick

Hey if you get a chance get a pic of that. I'd like to see the bolt part especially. Thks so much

'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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1 hour ago, VWScott said:

you watch the piece closely when the door is opening or closing you can see that it pulls at certain paoints causing the loose fitting to snap or better stated to make noise I dont care for.

Are the attach brackets secure with no relative movement when grabbed and wiggled?

Its very common for them to break away from where they are welded inside the A pillar.

Makes for slop/wiggle, you can see mine have been replaced with a cool repair hack a fellow faqqer was offering for sale a while back

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76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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Just now, tech71 said:

Are the attach brackets secure with no relative movement when grabbed and wiggled?

Its very common for them to break away from where they are welded inside the A pillar.

Makes for slop/wiggle, you can see mine have been replaced with a cool repair hack a fellow faqqer was offering for sale a while back

Brackets are good. its the arm/pin relationship.Sloppy fit. Yeah I think a bolt with a good fit would be way better especially since those pins dont have any obvious way of securing them.

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'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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18 minutes ago, VWScott said:

this a shoulder bolt?

Its a standard AN bolt, 1/4 in dia. I think, unthreaded shank with a high temp lock nut, yeah its sticking up a little, likes to move up and down a little.

The pins are actually rivets, have to drive them or they just fall out.

Thats why they suck so bad getting them out and good luck trying to drive a new one.

 

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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4 minutes ago, tech71 said:

Its an AN3 bolt, 1/4 in dia. unthreaded shank with a high temp lock nut, yeah its sticking up a little, likes to move up and down a little.

The pins are actually rivets, thats why they suck so bad getting them out and good luck trying to drive a new one.

 

thks mate

'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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FWIW...

I used a M5 socket head bolt with a 20mm shank that was about 40mm long.

I cut off most of the threads, leaving just enough to fasten the door brake arm with a M5 lock nut.

No more horrible "crack" when opening and closing the doors.

 

IMG_4063.thumb.jpg.730a721790f06eac5d70fc3173f06bbb.jpg

 

IMG_4070.thumb.jpg.c5680f2d87c29fc63083d845e09f3439.jpg

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2 minutes ago, John76 said:

FWIW...

I used a M5 socket head bolt with a 20mm shank that was about 40mm long.

I cut off most of the threads, leaving just enough to fasten the door brake arm with a M5 lock nut.

No more horrible "crack" when opening and closing the doors.

 

IMG_4063.thumb.jpg.730a721790f06eac5d70fc3173f06bbb.jpg

 

IMG_4070.thumb.jpg.c5680f2d87c29fc63083d845e09f3439.jpg

Thks. I just ordered a couple of bolts and other items on Belmetric.

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'67 Derby Grey VW Beetle

'76 Inka BMW 2002

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