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need help with 235/5 dogleg disassembly


Southcycle
Go to solution Solved by 2002iii,

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Hello All,

 

I'm new here and in a bit of a jam.  I'm trying to disassemble a 235/5 for inspection,  I started by removing the bellhousing.  I can't get it off.  I suspect the shifter rod may be bent, I just bought this used tranny on ebay and it may have been bent in shipping.  Please take a look and see if I'm missing something.  I appreciate any advice!

 

Thanks!

 

Richard

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23 minutes ago, Southcycle said:

Hello All,

 

I'm new here and in a bit of a jam.  I'm trying to disassemble a 235/5 for inspection,  I started by removing the bellhousing.  I can't get it off.  I suspect the shifter rod may be bent, I just bought this used tranny on ebay and it may have been bent in shipping.  Please take a look and see if I'm missing something.  I appreciate any advice!

 

Thanks!

 

Richard

IMG_1644.jpg

IMG_1645.jpg

IMG_1646.jpg

IMG_1647.jpg

These are a b**ch to take apart.  

"Goosed" 1975 BMW 2002

 

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15 minutes ago, 2002iii said:

You need a special tool to attach a puller to the front case.

I have a shocking number of pullers and a fabrication shop.  Do I attach to the bellhousing bolt holes and push against the end of the input shaft?

 

Thanks for the reply, I'm trying to make it to the racetrack and, as usual, I'm behind schedule!!

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  • Solution

The factory tool bolted in place of the throw out bearing tower and pushed against the input shaft.

 

I made my own tool out of plumbing pipe and adapters from the hardware store. 

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Edited by 2002iii
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I need to rebuild my 235/5 as well and have been doing everything I can not to take it apart.  The Rilex bearing puller, just keep stumbling into special stuff.  I bought all the parts for a rebuild quite a few years ago.  That wasn’t cheap.  Interesting to watch this thread.

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You need this puller to remove the bearing from the input shaft as well as the bell housing.  Then the other tool to put it back together.  There are a lot of secret handshakes to taking a 235/5 apart AND puttting it back together. 

 

The special tools are not absolutely necessary but there is a very good chance you will damage irreplaceable parts or have things "fall apart" and not know how to put them back together without them. 

 

Getting the bell housing off is the easy part.  If you are going to try and remove the gear clusters and replace synchros and bearings it is not intuitive if you have never been inside one before.  There is another special puller for the output shaft bearing as well.  

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1970 1602 (purchased 12/1974)

1974 2002 Turbo

1988 M5

1986 Euro 325iC

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Thanks for this great info.  I'm the new guy so I'm sorry if this has been beat to death.  

 

Are the special tools still available for order?

 

I would appreciate all part numbers for special tools as well as pictures of special tools with a ruler for reference.  If possible a drawing of tools would be great.  If there is enough interest I could reproduce those that are unavailable.

 

Thanks again for all the helpful replies!!

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The tools are way, way NLA, though you can find the bearing pullers very occasionally on ebay etc.  I have both bearing pullers but would be very interested in the tool that pulls the case to the bellhousing (and helps separate the two), which is tool number 611, if you decide to reproduce it.  I've been thinking about making one, but haven't made that happen.  You need:

 

Tool 611, which is the bottom tool in Byrons photo

 

A 6306 bearing puller long enough to fit over the output shaft.  The factory tool is a Rillex, but I was able to find a current production 6306 puller that works very well.

 

I think, but I'm not sure (Byron would know) that you do not need the really long bearing puller (6206) for the 235/5 input shaft like you do for the 232 transmission.   For some reason, I think the 235 uses a roller bearing for the input shaft, so you can just press the shaft out with tool 611.  I should go down and look in the manual, but maybe Byron will clarify that.  The factory manual (Blue Book) is decent for overhauling transmissions.  If you do need the long 6206 puller, I found one on a VW site, they are used for rear VW hubs.

 

 

1971 2002ti

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