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Preyupy

Turbo
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  1. Make sure there isn't any RTV in the hole in the back of the head. Also if the rear cam bearing is really loose on the cam there could be too much oil going into the distributor housing and the return hole may not be able to keep up.
  2. I agree that looks like Glypthol inside the block. With the leak down numbers you have I seriously doubt that the intake valves have been hitting those pistons. I suspect whoever built the engine fly-cut valve pockets in the pistons just for safety. Before you tear the head apart put some clay on the piston right at that point and put the head back on (with the old head gasket) hook up the chain and turn the engine over and check the valve to piston clearance. Unless that has a fairly serious camshaft you should hot have had any contact there unless someone mistimed the cam at some point and caused the contact.
  3. The new(er) Bilsteins have a longer threaded top and this is a problem now. If you put more spacers under the strut bearing you will raise the car. The strut insert might not be seated to the bottom of the housing but that is NOT what is causing this problem. Your options are: 1) don't run a cap (this allows moisture and dirt into the strut bearing) 2) put a small hole in the cap so the end of the strut pushes through (this will keep most of the moisture and dirt out) 3) machine the end of the shock (this makes it difficult to tighten the nut as you will loose the hex in the end) 4) put a spacer between the bottom of the spring perch and the top of the shock (if you are running lowered this will decrease the amount of Jounce travel you have before hitting the bump stop)
  4. This sounds a lot like the "stance" thread. For no other reason than how it looks. There is absolutely no reason to do it because by any possible measurement the function is degraded.
  5. according to the BMW parts description the "Tii" manifold was used on ALL of the 1800 and 2000cc engines in all of the European models (without air injection) The only US use was on the Tii . It also got used on the Euro E21 318 and 320s as well as the 518 and 520 E 12 chassis. I have never seen anyone do a back to back comparison between the manifolds on a dyno. I would suspect that with a stock engine you will not find a measurable difference. Once you start putting camshafts and carburetors on the engines there will start to be some difference but at that point a good tubular header is going to be even more of an advantage. 11621265449 Exhaust manifold From: 09/28/1976 To: 01/16/2012 (ENDED) Weight: 6.040 kg Price: $402.05 Supersedes: 11620743100 (01/01/1970 — 07/12/1977) Part 11621265449 was found on the following 114 vehicles: 1502-2002tii, 2000, Touring, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2631) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2000, Touring, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2632) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2000, Touring, M10, AUTO, EUR, (2636) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2000tii, Touring, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2661) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Convertible, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2251) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Convertible, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2252) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Convertible, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2573) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Convertible, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2577) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Convertible, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2578) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2211) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2212) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, AUTO, EUR, (2221) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, AUTO, EUR, (2222) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2551) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2553) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, AUTO, EUR, (2556) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, AUTO, EUR, (2557) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (ST11) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (ST13) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, AUTO, EUR, (ST14) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Sedan, M10, AUTO, EUR, (ST15) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Touring, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2411) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002, Touring, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2412) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002ti, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2554) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002tii, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2231) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002tii, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2232) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002tii, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, USA, (2233) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002tii, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2581) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002tii, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2582) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002tii, Sedan, M10, MANUAL, USA, (2583) : Exhaust manifold 1502-2002tii, 2002tii, Touring, M10, MANUAL, EUR, (2431) : Exhaust manifold
  6. Even Engine Dyno's differ from day to day and dyno to dyno. I find Chassis dynos to be the most variable from one to the other. Some are calibrated in Shetland Ponies and others are calibrated in Clydesdales. I have not spent much time on the dyno with street engines so anything with a 32/36 or 38/38 carburetor or any camshaft under a 304 is something I just have not played with recently. I have a 2313cc 2 valve M10 (92mm bore S14 EVO 87mm stroke crank) with a 336 cam on 48mm DCO carburetors that made 249 hp @ 8000 rpm (at the crank) but it's not much of a street engine (13:1 compression ratio means Race Fuel @ $11/gal).
  7. Yes, but after looking at the unit I could not figure out how to mount it without having to make major modifications to the transmission tunnel to make it fit. It might be just as easy to use a Porsche 944 transaxle and move some of the weight to the rear axle while you are at it if you are interested in some serious fabrication.
  8. There is a ground wire to the gauge also
  9. The plan was to make the GT160 into a street car. The biggest problem is the cost of the bodies. They are aluminum and fit on a slightly modified Mk7 sports racer chassis. When they got the bill for the 3 bodies Frank Nichols ( the founder of Elva) was shocked at the price as well as the weight of the body. They told Fisorè they wanted the body for a certain # of Pounds (Sterling) and it turned out that is what it weighed and the bill per body was about 20% more than what they were hoping to SELL the completed car for! A Mk7s with a M10 weighs 1025-1075lbs depending on the thickness of the Fiberglass Body. The GT160 weighs over 1500lbs with the same wheels, tires, suspension, brakes Engine and transmission. We have raced it a number of times, mostly at Elva Reunions ( they are the Holy Grail in the Elva world) but it gets slaughtered by the Mk7 sports racers. Of the 3 cars only 1 had covered headlights ( the LeMans race car) the other 2 had pop up lights because of headlight height requirements. The other problem with being a street car is getting not and out of it. It has a very wide sill ( not unlike a MB Gullwing) and the roof is very low. You get into it feet 1st, usually with one hand on the ground and slide in from there. It makes a GT40 feel like a Suburban. I have been been responsible for taking care of the LeMans car for almost 30 years now.
  10. Yep, just like that. It helps if you have the appropriate machine tools at your disposal (and know how to use them). Chrono tachs are fun but not very accurate in the lower gears, they don't respond very quickly. I had a customer with a McLaren CanAm car that was complaining that there was an engine misfire at 6200rpm coming out of the slowest corner on the track in 2nd gear but it was gone in 3rd, 4th and 5th. It was the 7000rpm rev limiter and the tach was that far behind.
  11. Just for a baseline, pull the hose from the cold start injector and put the hose is a container and turn on the fuel pump and see what kind of delivery volume you have. Obviously use great care to make sure you don't have a fire issue.
  12. Everyone that installed a mechanical tach did it on their own. There was no "Factory" kit. Everyone used the available drives from Smiths depending on how they wanted to route the cables and mount the tach. The trick was aligning it to the center of the camshaft and installing some kind of drive to attach to the cam. Then machining a flat on the face of the cover to mount the angle drive. I have even seen a couple of drives mounted on the distributor housings at the back of the engine. If you are looking for angle drives and reductions drives you might try Mo-Ma Manufacturing https://momamanufacturing.com/ we have been using them to repair Smith's gauges for at least 30 years including the Chrono Tachs
  13. Running the engine without a key there is a very good chance the pulley will spin on the crank, loosen the nut and damage the crank and pulley. The pickup screen on the pump will not let the key through so it is quite possible you will find it on the magnetic drain plug sooner or later. The idea of running a large magnet along the bottom of the pan and dragging it towards the drain plug would be my first try. Get another key key and get it installed IMMEDIATLY! DO NOT RUN THE ENGINE AGAIN WITHOUT IT OR YOU WILL BE TAKING THE CRANKSHAFT OUT TO REPLACE IT!
  14. Then make sure you take the reading on your timing light and divide by 2 to get the true advance.
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