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Building a chassis roller / rotisserie


Yojedi8802

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I am in the midst of a full restoration of my '72 roundie.  Everything stripped and body now on jack stands.  I've drafted up  a  roller / rotisserie to build for paint stripping and rust repairs.  Design objectives are light weight and can be disassembled for storage as it's just a hobby use.  So far I've found at my local metal supply shop some galvanized steel square tube, 1-1/4"x1-1/4"-16Ga.  Would this be strong enough for my purpose?

 

 

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16 ga  is only 1/16 in thick, I would definitely not be comfortable with that, it would lack rigidity big time.

Go thicker, even for occasional hobby use. Dont want it folding while man handling the shell around.

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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Yup I would use 3/16 and you don't want to weld galvanized steel, the fumes are bad for you, and it's hard to clean the galvanation off on the inside and outside to keep it from dripping into the weld which will lead to poping and molten metal spraying on you.

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If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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19 minutes ago, Son of Marty said:

Yup I would use 3/16 and you don't want to weld galvanized steel, the fumes are bad for you, and it's hard to clean the galvanation off on the inside and outside to keep it from dripping into the weld which will lead to poping and molten metal spraying on you.

 

   Would HR stee be a better choice?

Edited by Yojedi8802
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My choise would be mild steel 3/16 and gusset the uprights and the width of the base the same as the car. I made mine to mount up to the chassis sub frame mounts. Remember the cradle not only needs to take the weight it also must keep things true.

Edited by Son of Marty

If everybody in the room is thinking the same thing, then someone is not thinking.

 

George S Patton 

Planning the Normandy Break out 1944

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10 minutes ago, rstclark said:

Have one with mounts for  roundies or square tails in San Diego  I've used it and it works fine  PM me if you're  interested

It disassembles into smaller  transportable pieces

IMG_0542.jpg

That thing looks heavy duty.  PM'd you

 

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  • 1 year later...

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