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OT - Was looking for tranny brackets.


Lee

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I spent the past few days looking for a pair of tranny brackets to make the 5 speed conversion. BMW doesn't sell them anymore. They're not available from small shops no more. And not many peole will want to cut them from an original shell. Therefore I will make a batch of 40 units (available in pair) in a few days (hopefully end of week).

They are slightly shallower than stock brackets to allow as much clearance as possible for a bigger tranny bushing. My first 2002 had the original mounts cut and welded further back, and that was the best conversion I had. In the meanwhile I have tried the rail method and didn't like it as the rails interefered with the speedo cable, and took up precious room for the center muffler. Also, leaving the stock brackets in place does't leave much clearance between them and the tranny on one side (less than 2mm), therefore possibly becoming a source of annoying vibration when the engine (and tranny) move around. Cutting out the original brackets gives more room to work.

Anyway, the replacement brackets will have holes so that you can spot weld them, or bolt them thru the tranny walls. Will have pictures soon.

Massivescript_specs.jpg

Brake harder. Go faster.

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Also having measurements (how far back from the stock mounts are they?)/pictures of them mounted in a tranny tunnel would be very helpful.

There's not one precise measurement. Engine mounts do allow a bit of front-to-rear discrepencies. But basically if you measure th thickness of the center section of the 5 speed transmission, that's how far back the mounts will need to be moved. The brackets I am making do have about 12mm adjustement front-to-back though. But remember that the new brackets are not necessarely located on the same horizontal plan. They are a bit lower as the engine and trannies are aiming down. You want to make sure the driveshaft stays aligned. In my case, because it is a race car, I will make a smaller/stiffer rubber mount that will be height adjustable. There will be barely enough rubber to filter the vibrations, but not enough to allow movement. I already have the excellent IE urethane motor mounts.

Massivescript_specs.jpg

Brake harder. Go faster.

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Just for a reference, jakeb did a run of similar brackets not too long ago.

I don't think they are the same type. Jakeb made the same design as 2002Haus (horseshoe shape). But maybe he did another type and I am not aware. I have seen several iterations of the horseshoe mount and am not too hot because of the leverage effect and the lack of clearance due to the original mounts still being in place, not allowing enough clearance with the transmission.

Massivescript_specs.jpg

Brake harder. Go faster.

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Production of the mounting tabs has started this morning. They are laser cut from stainless steel and then machine folded. They shall be ready by the end of the week. Two holes on each end allows to either spot weld the tabs in place, or use the included 6mm bolts while drilling thru the sides of the tranny tunnel. I will supply the bolts in stainless steel with domed heads and Nylocks. After mounting, the extra length of thread will need to be ground away. To hold the tranny cross member, M8 x 1.25 x 25mm zinc plated bolts and flanged serrated nuts also come in the kit.

I highly recommend to get rid of the old tabs as they will be very close to the tranny. The reason is that the transmission's center section will be where only a guibo was. Not the same volume at all. And that makes lifting the tranny in place much easier. My experience with leaving the old tabs in place is that there might be only a couple of millimeter of clearance on the driver side (or maybe it's only the case on ealier 2002s), which can create vibes (from contact) when the engine twists under acceleration. Removing the old tabs gives you about 1-1/4" clearance on each side of the tranny. It also makes sliding-in the tranny easier.

Installation.

Sir Creighton Desmarais has posted a pretty good how-to. Look above.

The plan on which the cross member is located is 80mm above the frame rails

The new tabs are moved back by 3.5" or 89mm, or the same as the center section of the 5 speed tranny.

The mounting holes on the crossmember are now 192-194mm apart .

Basically, the tabs can be installed with the tranny removed. Allowing enough room to grind the excess bolt thread. Otherwise, the domes can be located in the tunnel, and the thread in the cockpit, for easier access.

Target price for stainless steel tabs and all fasteners (complete kit) will be in the neighborhood of $45usd. I will take Paypal and will give more details in a few days. Shop prices available for multiple sets.

Lee

Massivescript_specs.jpg

Brake harder. Go faster.

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