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Brake drum question


PSloan

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Okay - So I've actually started tearing into the 1600 to try to make it road-worthy. I'm starting with the brakes. They are actually functional now - but not trustworthy. I'm going to bleed them, do new lines, new rotors, drums, pads, shoes and wheel cylinders.

None of this presents a problem - except one part. The drums. So, I have a series of questions:

1. Can you turn drums? (May be stupid - but I've never asked?)

2. What models came with what size drums? (Mine is a 67 1600)

3. If I use a larger drum with my stock single line front calipers will I need a bias valve?

4. Can anyone source 1600 drums for less than $250 a piece? (I'm looking to spend like $50 per drum)

5. Are there any other differences in the 1600 braking system I may not know about?

Thanks in advance,

Patrick

EDIT: one more question:

Are the front brake lines on the single circuit system the same as the dual circuit system - just one fewer per side?

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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1. Can you turn drums? Yep--maximum size is cast into the inner drum face

2. What models came with what size drums? (Mine is a 67 1600) Think it's smaller than the 2002 but don't remember the exact size

3. If I use a larger drum with my stock single line front calipers will I need a bias valve? You should be OK, as the early 2002s had single line front calipers and larger than 1600 rear drums

4. Can anyone source 1600 drums for less than $250 a piece? (I'm looking to spend like $50 per drum) Unless you're trying to stay bone stock, I think I'd go for 2002 brakes/drums. Cheaper and much more readily available. And I'll bet the brake adjusters on your are are all boogered up anyway.

5. Are there any other differences in the 1600 braking system I may not know about? I believe the rear wheel cylinders are smaller on the 1600 than the 2002, but don't remember for sure.

That'll get you started. Other FAQers can provide the exact info on drum and wheel cyl sizes.

cheers

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Thanks Mike. You're always a wealth of information. I'm thinking I'll just convert to the larger drums with new parts. I'm trying to keep it stock - but I can make some small exceptions. However, If I can still turn mine I think I'll give it a shot and see how it goes.

Interesting thing to ponder:

My 1600 has OE tires and the ODO reads just over 4k miles. I don't know what to think of it.

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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Thanks Mike. You're always a wealth of information. I'm thinking I'll just convert to the larger drums with new parts. I'm trying to keep it stock - but I can make some small exceptions. However, If I can still turn mine I think I'll give it a shot and see how it goes.

Interesting thing to ponder:

My 1600 has OE tires and the ODO reads just over 4k miles. I don't know what to think of it.

Another point to ponder - going to 2002 brakes will mean installing larger backing plates and disassembling the rear wheel hubs from the half shafts. And, yes, 1600 wheel cylinders are the same diameter as a tii. You'll want to go with 2002 cylinders if you go with 2002 drums. That should take care of the front/rear bias question.

If your 1600's condition warrants it and resale value matters to you, you should consider keeping it bone stock. I think those real early 1600's are gonna be worth something if they're original, which it sounds like yours is quite close to being. An original 1600 is just way cool, too. I sometimes regret having sold my '68, especially when the tii acts like it might get expensive.

Jerry

no bimmer, for now

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I took the drums off last night and they are out of spec - or so says o'reilly. They are 200 and 199 - whatever that means. Regardless, o'reilly sells brembo drums for the 1600 for $50 a piece which is okay.

I had a multitude of spiders living in my suspension - which was a real treat. I'm going to drop the rear subframe soon and rework all of the bushings and paint it.

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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Patrick, make sure you replace the tension springs (2 types, 2 per side). I just bought mine a few months back from Tischer BMW. My drums were fine at 164k miles so I didn't touch them, just pads and springs. You can get the new cylinders really cheap from online auto parts warehouses believe it or not. I paid like $45 each and they looked just like the originals. They are the same as 68+ 1600's. To be safe compare the photo online to your actual cyl and you will recognize the design.

Jeff
1975 Alfa Romeo GT1300Junior w/1600 transplant (I'm still stuck on 1600's LOL)
2006 M3 White/Red - Orig Owner,6spd,ZCP, sunroof delete
SOLD 1967 1600 #1517644 "Florida"/Brown w/sunroof, SOLD 1968 1600 #1564660, RIP 1970 1600

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See now, I'm not sure I trust that my drums are worn. There's BARELY a lip on the inside from wear. I think I'm just going to clean them up, spray them, and go. My shoes have lots of emat on them still - I'll just replace the springs and wheel cylinders and call it a day.

Patrick Sloan

1975 inka 2002 - 2375719

1991 325iC

2001 325i

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Guest Anonymous

Yeah the drums and shoes back there must get very little wear anyway. The car is only 2000lbs and rear brakes provide much less of the stopping power than the front...

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