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Alternator alignment


kremington

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I'm troubleshooting an alternator issue... I've noticed that the alternator on my '74 tii is slightly tweaked towards the radiator and thus the pulley is not aligned with the water pump pulley. I just installed a NEW lower bracket and lower bushings yet it's still tweaked. Should I induce an offset (i.e., bend it) on the bracket to adjust the alternator's position... or is there another way? Thanks!

-Keith

'74 Atlantik 2002tii

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(black) or the much harder urethane ones (red, blue, tan depending on the maker). The urethane bushings will pretty much eliminate the misalignment and will last infinitely longer than the rubber ones. They're available from many sources--and don't forget the one that supports the lower (adjustable) arm...there are three bushing altogether.

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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(black) or the much harder urethane ones (red, blue, tan depending on the maker). The urethane bushings will pretty much eliminate the misalignment and will last infinitely longer than the rubber ones. They're available from many sources--and don't forget the one that supports the lower (adjustable) arm...there are three bushing altogether.

mike

Hey thanks for the pointer. I only replaced the lower arm bushings with factory replacements. Where else are there bushings? Sorry, I'm still learning. Could you direct me to one or two sources for the urethane?

-Keith

'74 Atlantik 2002tii

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Guest Anonymous

don't over tighten it - just enough that it doesn't squeal on start-up - or the 1/2 inch or so the book says u should be able to depress the belt.

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Not totally off-topic:

What are the standard tii fan belt dimensions? I've bought several different ones around the auto parts store catalog standard size and none of them fit real well. I ran out of tension adjustment and still get an occasional squeal. There's not much adjustment in the first place.

Jerry

no bimmer, for now

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Per the "blue book", there are (2) sizes for the tii alternator:

9.5 x 975 and 9.5 x 965 serrated to prevent squeaking.

My alternator also did the tipsy thing but when I pulled it out, it had some crumbling urethane bushings! At first, I installed new bushings from BavAuto into my original alternator, but it started squealing so I replaced it with a reman. Bosch AL-40X. I'm running a Continental 10 x 975 serrated belt on mine.

post-8235-1366759411906_thumb.jpg

post-8235-13667594121564_thumb.jpg

Jim Gerock

 

Riviera 69 2002 built 5/30/69 "Oscar"

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Per the "blue book", there are (2) sizes for the tii alternator:

9.5 x 975 and 9.5 x 965 serrated to prevent squeaking.

My alternator also did the tipsy thing but when I pulled it out, it had some crumbling urethane bushings! At first, I installed new bushings from BavAuto into my original alternator, but it started squealing so I replaced it with a reman. Bosch AL-40X. I'm running a Continental 10 x 975 serrated belt on mine.

Ok, I see what bushings everyone is talking about now, thanks to the photos. In my case, I have the 'new' Bosch AL-40X alternator and just installed it earlier this year. I kinda doubt the bushings in the housing are that worn already. Would it be necessary to replace them anyway w/ urethane in order to get the alignment right? I tend to think it's the lower adjustment arm bushings that are the issue... or maybe said arm needs to be bent back towards the engine?

-Keith

'74 Atlantik 2002tii

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As you can probably tell from my pics, I decided to just use the stock bushings that came with the new alternator. There is a 3rd bushing that mounts the arm to the engine. If that one is mushy, then replacing it should take care of your issues. I believe the arm itself should be flat.

Good luck and keep us informed.

Jim Gerock

 

Riviera 69 2002 built 5/30/69 "Oscar"

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