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Weber carburator


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Hello
I need a carburetor for my 1973 2002, there's a new one in the local craigslist, is listed as 32/36 dgv / WK746M marking on the box. manual choke.
I have a 32/36 dgv 5A Manual choke.
I was doing a search and it shows that model for Toyota pick up truck, I couldn't find anything fitting a BMW 2002
The question is will this carb fit on my car? I just want to be sure before I spend the money and get stuck with the wrong part,
 
Thanks,
 
 
Edited by RicanBeemer
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2 hours ago, esty said:

any Weber DGV 32/36 will fit your car...

 

I fixed that for you esty.  The Weber DFV is a 32/36, but it's the mirror image.  That one is used on old VW engines.

 

2 hours ago, RicanBeemer said:

I have a 32/36 dgv 5A Manual choke.

 

What is wrong with the one you have?

 

Keep in mind that there are Genuine Weber carbs and then there are Knock offs, which are typically cheaper, (in terms of pricing).

   

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76mintgrun02mm, I think I got a knock off, there's no stamping at all, only a sticker with a W.

Mine was hesitating  at 40  and higher speed, like is was starving for fuel.

I just got the car from a dealer so there is no history of prior maintenance.

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If the one on Craigslist is set up for a Toyota pickup truck (probably a Tacoma) you'll probably need to re-jet it for your '02.  But there are literally hundreds of posts--and as many "surefire setups" on how to jet a Weber for an '02 as there are folks with Webers on their '02s.  

 

Hesitation at higher speed can be a whole bunch of things, including a non-functioning accelerator pump, second barrel not opening properly, wrong jets, vacuum leak....the list goes on and on.  You need to check one thing at a time, so when the problem finally goes away, you'll know what you did to fix it.  It wouldn't hurt at all to take the old carb off, give it a thorough cleaning (make sure you reinstall the primary and secondary jets in their respective spots) and see if that cures the problem.

 

mike

 

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Ah.  I see.  Do you think the one from the Toyota is an honest to goodness Weber?

 

Have you checked the fuel lines coming off of the tank in the trunk?  It is important that they are nice fresh rubber hoses and not the old cloth covered originals.  There is also a plastic sleeve on the fuel tank sender that can crack and let air get sucked into the line.

 

I did not get any maintenance history with my car either and it was pretty needy when I got it.

   

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Thanks Mike, looks like I have to get a rebuild kit and fix it my old one

 

The one I just bought was a knock off. To change the jets I have to open the top of the carb right, is it even worth going thru the trouble installing the fake one.

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The reason I brought up the knock off question had to do with pricing.  I did not mean to suggest that only a Genuine Weber will work.

 

I like Mike's suggestion.  Take the one you have off, open it up and clean everything. Write down what jets/air correctors/emulsion tubes are in it and do the same for the new one.

 

I would not install the new one without at least opening it up and writing down what all the jets and stuff are.

 

Then you could search the archives for the [ c.d.eisel jetting prescription ] and open up the two carbs you have to see if you have the jets he suggests.  

 

Check/set the float height, keeping in mind that there are different settings for the plastic, vs brass floats.

 

The Webers are pretty approachable.  There are good rebuilding instruction threads online and some videos too. 

 

I enjoyed watching the ones from Pierce Manifolds.  He gives a nice overview.

 

It is a 3 part video.  Here's number 1

 

 

   

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i've bought and installed a lot of 32/35 webers over the years...my procedure for getting it up and running is simple...bolt it to the car, adjust the mixture and idle, drive the heck out of it, then fiddle with it, if necessary...

 

out of all the "knock offs" i've ever installed only one gave me trouble and it was a 38/38...the "knock offs" have run as well as the pricier genuine...

 

between what you don't know and what you read on the internet, carbs can make you obsessive compulsive about every minor blip in the rpm gauge because your inclination is that the carb is defective when it might have been a drop of water blowing through the carb, etc, etc

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8 hours ago, RicanBeemer said:

The one I just bought was a knock off. To change the jets I have to open the top of the carb right, is it even worth going thru the trouble installing the fake one.

 

My experience: The Weber knock-off's can be troublesome. I've seen poor machining/QC, cover screws which don't have an integral locking washer (they rattle out), and other issues. My suggestion is to avoid the knock-off's, and beware of retailers who substitute/sell them without full disclosure. -KB

 

weber-knock-off copy.jpg

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