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Options over 3M Weatherstrip for the heater flap insulation?


zambo

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Title sums it up - the black 3M Super Weatherstrip seems to be the preferred product over time on  discussions here on FAQ - not as easy to get here in Oz - seen as a trade product.

 

A marine shop specialist said he used the JB silicone and adhesive in all sort of boat environments including engine rooms so it seems rated for the heat generated in the box and it is designed for weatherstrip, etc. Also I have the commercial Wurth Rubber Glue which is rated to 80C. 

 

This project is all ready for this glueing stage and then reassembly so keen for some experienced views on this if possible before proceeding. Like everyone else says on here on the various heater box rebuild, you don't want to take this out again if it can be avoided or else it might drive you ?!

 

Thanks 

 

Richard

Edited by zambo
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Bunnings has closed cell foam, but if it’s for the windscreen de mister flaps I’d go for a softer foam or the flaps won’t close properly and hot / cold air will leak into the car.

i had this issue on mine so I went for a softer foam only on the flaps that cover cover the windscreen defrosters tubes, the footwell flaps were ok with the closed cell.

Also you can use the closed cell to mount to the opening in the plenum, if you use mastic here I’ve found the fragile nature of the old plastics can be impacted as the mastic holds the box firm.

Good luck!

 

Edited by SydneyTii
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Sorry guys - my bad - I left out the word adhesive after “3M Super Weatherstrip” - it’s the adhesive that’s my question. I have all the foam from the Blunt kit.  Apologies - it’s what happens when you type something up quickly and assume what’s in your head magically comes thru your fingertips. 

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i used self adhesive camper top closed cell foam tape from home depot. That was 6 years ago, no problems. I actually had to do the job twice since i used contact adhesive and regular foam the first time and a week later the glue melted and everything fell off.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-King-E-O-1-1-4-in-x-3-16-in-x-30-ft-Camper-Mounting-Tape-for-Trucks-V447H/100122697

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1976 BMW 2002 Chamonix. My first love.

1972 BMW 2002tii Polaris. My new side piece.

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1 hour ago, Stevenc22 said:

i used self adhesive camper top closed cell foam tape from home depot. That was 6 years ago, no problems. I actually had to do the job twice since i used contact adhesive and regular foam the first time and a week later the glue melted and everything fell off.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-King-E-O-1-1-4-in-x-3-16-in-x-30-ft-Camper-Mounting-Tape-for-Trucks-V447H/100122697

 

Thanks Steven - I’ve got the Blunt kit so am good with the foam and I think it has performed in the marketplace to date.
 

I’ve read up on the contact adhesive and agree its not for this application. Just trying to figure out what else other than the 3M Super Weatherstrip adhesive will work.

My gut feeling is the silicone adhesive from JB would more than suffice given its rated to like 500 degrees F, but wanted any shared experiences before proceeding further. 

Edited by zambo
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2 hours ago, Hans said:

Is there any sort of backing on the foam? I'm surprised you can't get the 3m stuff at sn auto body repair/ paint supply store.


For some reason Hans it tends to be a trade product for spray painters and upholstery guys who may refit weatherstrip, etc. as part of their scope on a project. 
 

The 3M product isn’t impossible to get just a few hoops to jump thru. There is a supplier to the trade I visit occasionally for some underbody stuff by SEM and I think they have it. So will ring in the morning when I get to the office. 
 

Across the 3M range we can usually get most things at big box hardware stores like Bunnings (our version of Home Depot) - the easy availability or lack there of on this was a bit of a surprise to be honest. 

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1 hour ago, tech71 said:

Dont know if this is any easier to get down there, Its what I used in my heater box and my carpet kit.

901D54CB-20CE-4965-9FFC-C4EB0269FEBA.jpeg

 

Based on a quick google, I think is available at local big box - Bunnings. Will call and check in the morning. Thanks for all the input guys.

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16 hours ago, zambo said:

 

Thanks Steven - I’ve got the Blunt kit so am good with the foam and I think it has performed in the marketplace to date.
 

I’ve read up on the contact adhesive and agree its not for this application. Just trying to figure out what else other than the 3M Super Weatherstrip adhesive will work.

My gut feeling is the silicone adhesive from JB would more than suffice given its rated to like 500 degrees F, but wanted any shared experiences before proceeding further. 

 

Bonding strength in this application will depend on the type of foam. I read the installation info from Steve's web site, https://tinyurl.com/02HVACrebuild.  The type of foam is not specified.  It does say, do not apply the adhesive to the foam because it will absorb it.  Thus, not a closed cell foam.  If polyethylene foam it will be difficult to bond regardless of adhesive.

 

The L brand, in aerosol shown in previous posts, is a contact type adhesive, thus should be sprayed on both surfaces. Literature in one bullet point in the "not recommended" section states combinations of high humidity and heat could cause bond failure.

Directions recommend  spray adhesive on both surfaces.  

https://dm.henkel-dam.com/is/content/henkel/TDS-2267077-US-Loctite-Professional-Performance-300-Spray-Adhesive-Spray-Can-13.5-oz-2017-12-14pdf

 

Not much help without knowing the type of foam. When I rebuilt a heater box 1/4" closed cell foam with PSA was used.

 

Don

 

Edited by beammmer
Cut and Paste

Don

1973 Sahara # too long ago, purchased in 1978 sold in 1984

1973 Chamonix # 2589243 Katrina Victim, formerly in the good sawzall hands of Baikal.2002 and gone to heaven.

1973 Inka # 2587591 purchased from Mike McCurdy, Dec 2007

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3M 1357 contact adhesive is probably the best but

there are some restrictions even here on purchasing 3M 1357 now.

https://www.amazon.com/3M-Neoprene-Performance-Adhesive-Gray-Green/dp/B000WXL202/ref=sr_1_3?crid=4HVROE3ZPZ66&dchild=1&keywords=3m+1357+contact+adhesive&qid=1587916974&sprefix=3M+1357%2Caps%2C217&sr=8-

Rightly so I think, it's packing a lot of known carcinogens ect.

I hate using it, used it a lot through out my career. I still have a pint here on the shelf but rarely resort to it now.

I may have to break it out for my trunk gasket though

The black weatherstrip adhesive is still available at auto parts stores ect?

Edited by tech71

76 2002 Survivor

71 2002 Franzi

85 318i  Doris

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4 hours ago, beammmer said:

 

Bonding strength in this application will depend on the type of foam. I read the installation info from Steve's web site, https://tinyurl.com/02HVACrebuild.  The type of foam is not specified.  It does say, do not apply the adhesive to the foam because it will absorb it.  Thus, not a closed cell foam.  If polyethylene foam it will be difficult to bond regardless of adhesive.

 

The L brand, in aerosol shown in previous posts, is a contact type adhesive, thus should be sprayed on both surfaces. Literature in one bullet point in the "not recommended" section states combinations of high humidity and heat could cause bond failure.

Directions recommend  spray adhesive on both surfaces.  

https://dm.henkel-dam.com/is/content/henkel/TDS-2267077-US-Loctite-Professional-Performance-300-Spray-Adhesive-Spray-Can-13.5-oz-2017-12-14pdf

 

Not much help without knowing the type of foam. When I rebuilt a heater box 1/4" closed cell foam with PSA was used.

 

Don

 


Thanks Don. I’ve sent a mail off to Steve asking his clarification on the type of foam and advice. 
 

Looking at it just now, I’m not sure what it is but it feels more like the foam you get as packing than the denser stuff I associate with closed cell. But I’m no foam expert ?

ED59AB23-9C3C-4F1C-B39B-A093F2F1330B.jpeg

323F63DD-848B-4E8E-BDC2-7E1581727BC1.jpeg

CB495545-2F02-4DBE-B0CE-7AACE12E0880.jpeg

46C22D0E-D827-4E23-AC73-017ACE83ECC9.jpeg

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