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Super tight steering box nut. Ugh!


DonF
Go to solution Solved by Conserv,

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Original owner of ‘76 ‘02 and have never tried to tighten steering.  Front end links are all “tight”.  My Problem  - can’t loosen top nut on steering box to adjust screw a little.  Tried lots of manual force and normal wrench leverage - not yet with long breaker bar.  Would large impact wrench be overkill and could damage the box or connection somehow? 

Assume of course that threads on nut have normal direction - loosen to left. 

Thanks.      Don
BC67C8E5-AA68-4E69-8103-E42177061F78.thumb.jpeg.eae51a80afe37859e629a3dd2ef94b28.jpeg

 

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That nut is threaded onto a steel screw, which in turn is threaded into the aluminum housing.  I'd be a little leery of using an air wrench to try and loosen it, just in case the nut is jammed onto the screw.   From your picture it doesn't appear to be all rusty, so you should be able to get it loose with "ordinary" force.  Didja give it a little dose of Kroil, PB Blaster or something similar (not WD40)?

 

I generally use enough extensions to get the socket wrench above the fender top, then use a cheater bar on my 3/8 drive socket wrench.  It's always come loose.  

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Thnx for thoughts on impact wrench.  Will steer clear.  
Have used 10” extension for socket to  be able to swing it.  Guess next will be adding some extension bar leverage to the socket wrench ….and bigger muscles.  Will try some Kroil oil first.  

Have about 1.5” play in steering and all these years was not aware of adjustment.  :(

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You'll get it loose unless there's something mechanically wrong with the nut's threads.  I have an 18" long piece of brass plumbing pipe that I slip over the handle of my 3/8" socket wrench.  Gives you just enough extra torque without fear of breaking bolts larger than 8-10mm. 

 

When you do the adjustment, be sure to have the wheels clear of the ground, and don't over-tighten.  That'll make the steering unnecessarily stiff, and cause wear to the steering box internal parts. 

 

mike

  • Like 1

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Thanks, again, Mike.  I’m pretty read up on the technique for the adjustment  thanks to lots of earlier forum posts. .  Think I’ll get an 18” breaker socket bar next.  Good to have in the tool mix.


Nice to have the time to finally start getting our ‘76 jade gruen back into good driving shape.  

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5 hours ago, NYNick said:

Heat?

Not a good idea--you may well cook the seals in the box, and experience the phenomenon of an incontinent steering box peeing all it's gear oil on your garage floor...not to mention melting the plastic fill cap and catching the oil on fire, or carbonizing it.  

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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Heat can work but not for this spot.

Will get socket wrench extender and try more leverage/force.  
 

Then on to tuneup and engine checkup.  As expected after 155k puts out some smoke - likely at least valve guides/seals. 

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1 hour ago, DonF said:

As expected after 155k puts out some smoke - likely at least valve guides/seals. 

Smoke on the overrun (coasting in gear, especially at higher rpms) = worn valve guides/stem seals.  Replace with those used on the E30 version of the M10. 

 

Smoke on acceleration = worn rings.  

 

Usually.

 

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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  • Solution

Just to manage your expectations, 1.5" of play in the front end could be attributable to quite a few things, in addition to the steering box: tie rod ends, ball joints, bushings, etc. The steering box adjustment screw may tighten things up a bit, and you should push forward and do it -- but don't over-tighten it. And don't expect miracles!

 

And, hey, original owner, let's get your car into this forum's Registry! There are not too many of us left! 😳

 

Regards,

 

Steve

 

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

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17 hours ago, Conserv said:

And, hey, original owner, let's get your car into this forum's Registry! There are not too many of us left!

And Don, PM me as I'm collecting original 2002 owner stories for a future Roundel column.  There are a surprising number of us on the FAQ...more than I could fit in a single column (Feb 23 Roundel) so am collection stories for a future column.

 

mike

  • Like 2

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

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14 hours ago, DonF said:

Steve - Got it on the steering adjustment.   Thanks.

 

Where Registry info?      Don

 


Don,

 

https://www.bmw2002faq.com/registry/

 

Otherwise, choose “Browse” from the main menu across the top of the page. Then select “Registry” from the drop-down menu that appears. Then choose “Add new vehicle”. And you’re in!
 

Thanks and best regards,

 

Steve

 

 

1976 2002 Polaris, 2742541 (original owner)

1973 2002tii Inka, 2762757 (not-the-original owner)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Baby step but progress.  Received my  an 18” breaker bar and with it and a little penetrating oil broke the stuck steering  box nut loose.  On to a little steering wheel tightening after the holidays. Then to engine inspection and plan.  

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