Jump to content

Engine is out. Transmission rebuild now?


rjd2
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey all,  I've got a quick question for you. So I've got a '73 here that I got for parts, and have decided to try to bring back to life itself. When I got the car, the engine was disassembled; I've never seen it run. I'm not into the car for a huge sum, so while I don't want to end up underwater on it, I can afford to spend some coin smartly. My question is this: what should I do about the transmission, now that the engine is out? It feels like it shifts smoothly, I have no reason to think it has any issues, but I'm wondering if it would be wise to pull it now, and either A) do a rebuild, or B  consider the 5 speed upgrade? It's pretty oily/grimey; I'm fairly sure it hasn't seen any service in a long time, if at all. Reliability is of a higher premium for me than a 5 speed, but I wouldnt mind the upgrade. I've got time, as I'll need to blast the car, do metalwork, so on and so forth. Thanks for the suggestions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another opinion: If I read your post correctly, engine is disassembled and out of the car, but transmission is still in the car? If that's the case, I'd suggest pulling the transmission out of the car as well. Clean it, check fluid level (would not hurt to replace the fluid and inspect the drain plug), inspect shift tower bushings, shift rod seal, giubo (flex disc), etc.

 

With the shift tower and shift lever installed, you can use a 1/2" electric drill and spin the input shaft; go through all gears and listen for noises. Do this now, and you get an early check-mark. Add that many find installing the gearbox after the engine is installed to be easier (or, installing the whole assembly from the bottom ... search this forum). -KB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not aware, nor I believe is anyone here aware, of anyone who cheaply rebuilds the 4-speeds or the 5-speeds. So a "while it's out" rebuild will not be cost-effective. You can try checking for play at the input shaft, and as kbmb02 said, you can try spinning the input shaft, but really you're going to need to put it in a car to see what it does.

 

5-speed conversions are great if you drive a ton of highway miles, but they're quite expensive, as the junkyard source of cheap 320i 5-speeds is long gone. If you drive the car mainly around town, the four speed is fine. It's fine on the highway too; it's your ears that mind the high RPMs more than the car.

 

--Rob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

good to know. thanks.

 

i see the 5 speed conversion/rebuild kit; is this a thing i could tackle on my own, you think? over the course of the few months it'll take to get the body dealt with and engine block machined? or is it a nightmare? i've rebuilt carburetors and such, but never something as big as a trans. i follow instructions well and am patient, though! if it's a black art like engine block work, then i won't open that can of worms...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Upcoming Events

×
×
  • Create New...