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Downdraft Weber Upgrade 32/36 vs. 38/38


'ol_rusty

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I am having a hard time deciding which Weber carburetor to upgrade to. I have looked a past posts and still undecided. I am leaning toward the 32/36 since it is nearly half the cost of a 38/38.

**The most important question I have is: Will the 32/36 provide a noticeable increase in performance?**

I have a strong, stock '75 with Solex 2bbl, Pertronix points, headers, and 2 1/4" exhaust.

I may have the cam ground in the distant future, but it's not currently in the budget.

Thanks for the input.

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**The most important question I have is: Will the 32/36 provide a noticeable increase in performance?** = YES

I have a strong, stock '75 with Solex 2bbl, Pertronix points, headers, and 2 1/4" exhaust. = YES

don't need a 'cam' when the 32/36 is singing correctly.

the 38/38 is NOT for the street - and waiting for Stop Lights

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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Guest Anonymous

My 02 cents worth, which is not exactly on point, but you may want to consider. When I first purchased my current car, I replaced an old 32/36 with a new one and the performance improved, but not dramatically. Having had a tii in the day, I really was looking for more kick and eventually replaced the 32/36 with a 38/38 and the improvement was a dramatic enhancement in accleration, especially over 3000 rpm's. My car now ran nearly as quick as a friend's tii. I'm sure others will chime in on this issue. FWIW, spend the extra money and go for a 38/38. It will put a smile on your face. Good luck.

___________________

Roger

'72 Malaga

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I have had my 2002 since 1983 and run all three carbs at one time or another...

Original Solex... "OK" - I didn't know any better so to speak.

Had engine rebuilt in 1987 and (being in CA then) had to stay smog legal but still wanted to improve things. 32/36 only choice and it worked fine.

FYI- Rebuild was stock with exception of 9.5:1 pistons

In around 2002 or so - The 32/36 was in distress - (15 years had taken its toll.... and 75k miles too)

I installed a 38DGAS....

:-)))))))))))))))))))))))))

I will never look back.

(I also installed mechanical advance distributor and Pertronix - otherwise engine is as rebuilt in 1987)

YMMV of course but those are my thoughts.....

Kevin

Seattle

1970 2800CS - 1985 728i - 2001 E38

 

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Guest Anonymous

Try looking through the archives.

This subject has been beaten to death there.

BayArea 02 has had an article on this subject posted for years.

Nothing in what I have read or heard has changed - same opinions.

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FAQ Gang - I'm afraid 'your' not really helping 'ol_rusty with accurate opinions

and solutions.

'ol_rusty - you'll get more accurate guidance if you state up front

what your $$ budget is. AND how much mechanical ability,

experience you have to 'dial-in' any future fuel system changes.

A 32/36 is a bolt-on installation with your present

2-barrel carb manifold. It is not with a 38/38 which requires

you to either machine your present manifold, or

purchase a install kit manifold already machined for

the 38/38. The 38/38 is useless if it does not have the correct

inlet port sizes and dimentions. 38/38 is a larger opening

better suited to driving aggressivly, with 1/2 or more throttle most

of the time. Not suited to real world idling, stop n-go traffic,

with speed limits, or good fuel economy. A great Track Day Carb.

32/36 meets all the conditions of economy (also installation costs)

, idle, stop n-go traffic conditions, and plenty of power for track days,

and an improvement in power over your current SOLEX.

if cost is no object, or your driving in Sport Events(mostly OPEN-FULL

THROTTLE), and your willing to compromise some in smooth fuel

efficient running - go for the 38/38

you also mention 'someday' having a "cam" - well you

don't have a cam now, and your cart-in-front-of the

horse by thinking that you'll install a 38/38 now and later

'cam' the car. Tune with what you have NOW, and can afford

today to keep your car running smoothly and reliably.

You need to gather information from EACH car owner with

32/36 or 38/38, or duel DCOE's to hear how each car lives.

ALL the facts in each case. Climate, speeds, throttle use,

cost, street %, track%, miles per year, MPG ?, are there

still 'issues' with any of these owners? or do they just drive

blindly with inaccurate jetting, poorer power than is possible

with their 'set-up'.

this is a 'message' board with world-wide opinions

just trying to help you find the right course

22680.033a.JPG

  • Like 1

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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My experience with the 38/38 is a bit different regarding the real world driving, idling, etc. I started with a single barel solex and moved to the 32/36 - dramatic improvement all around, and a noticeable extra kick when the secondary opened up. Moved up to the 38/38 - night and day difference. The low end pulled significantly stronger and the upper end was also improved. Smooth response at any RPM, idled great, mileage was "good" - not sure of the exact numbers, but massively better than my V6 Nissan Xterra.

I have since rebuilt the engine, mildly hopping it up in the process. I am still running the 38/38 and have come to find in the tuning process that the out-of-the-box jetting was running very lean for my setup, and looking back was probably still too lean when the motor was more stock. I don't think I am 100% dialed in on the jetting yet, but I have a very smooth running car that idles well and pulls great at just about any RPM - even with the bigger cam the idle and low end power is great. I think there may be more to be had in the upper end, but right now it is still running very strong and is very smmoth and pleasent to drive even in traffic. The mileage is still a little early to tell since I have been tweaking with it som much lately (and my odometer doesn't work), but there is still no comparison between this car and the SUV.

My recommendation would be to go with the 38/38 for sure.

Brian

'72 2002

'91 325i

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FAQ Gang - I'm afraid 'your' not really helping 'ol_rusty with accurate opinions

and solutions.

CD, our opinions are at least as accurate as yours...

And, in this case, you're wrong. Nee-ner nee ner nee ner!

A well- tuned Solex is almost as much

carb as a 32/36, flow- wise. It's not great, but decent.

A 38/38 has a completely different mode of operation- it gives a lot

more power as soon as you crack the throttle, more like DCOE's.

(which, if you're into it, are worth the price of entry...)

Those of us who like to DRIVE our cars love the throttle response and

don't mind the loss of 2-5 mpg.

(the 38/38, btw, idles just like the 36, and will launch from a stoplight.

Fun? Yes! Cheap? Not usually...)

The only down side I found was that the 38 isn't designed to be used on an

open- plenum manifold, so getting the transition jetting set up right

was difficult, and a compromise.

I'm with Kevin- it's worth the dough.

Your mileage will decrease. Your grins will increase.

Then you'll want more cam....

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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My experience with the 38/38 is a bit different regarding the real world driving, idling, etc. I started with a [] 32/36 - dramatic improvement all around, and a noticeable extra kick when the secondary opened up. Moved up to the 38/38 - night and day difference.

My recommendation would be to go with the 38/38 for sure.

ditto....and i've had the same 38/38 on several of my o2's with the same fantastic results with each car.....

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. . . .ok 38/38 experts , now give 'ol_rusty an

itemized $$ estimate for installing a 38/38, which is

part of his original question:

WEBER 38/38 ________________ $

manifold machined_____________ $

manifold NEW _________________ $

gaskets, coolent hoses, gas hoses, clamps

fancy air filter, gas filter _________ $

LABOR if he has to pay someone to install _______ $

misc. jets to get it running right ____ $

TOTAL for 'correct' running car ____ $

18930.020.JPG

99004.095.jpg

'86 R65 650cc #6128390 22,000m
'64 R27 250cc #383851 18,000m
'11 FORD Transit #T058971 28,000m "Truckette"
'13 500 ABARTH #DT600282 6,666m "TAZIO"

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